Author Topic: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2  (Read 72907 times)

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4410 on: November 17, 2021, 02:49:17 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4411 on: November 18, 2021, 12:47:44 AM »
Despite many questions Trump's White House never denounced Lin Wood's call for Pence to die by firing squad
https://www.rawstory.com/trump-denounce-lin-wood-pence/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4412 on: November 18, 2021, 12:53:26 AM »
'It's a bad day' for MAGA rioters after watching QAnon Shaman get 41 months in jail: defense lawyer
https://www.rawstory.com/qanon-shaman-jail-sentence/

]b]Capitol Hill rioters: ‘US Congress members helped us plan attack’
Protest organisers claim to have met ‘dozens’ of times with lawmakers and White House staff[/b]
https://www.theweek.co.uk/news/world-news/us/954571/did-members-of-congress-help-capitol-hill-rioters

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4413 on: November 18, 2021, 07:02:28 AM »
'The past is the past': Rupert Murdoch says Trump needs to get over losing 2020 election
https://www.rawstory.com/rupert-murdoch-trump-2655755623/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4414 on: November 18, 2021, 11:58:18 PM »
Two Iranians were behind 2020 emails that threatened violence against people unless they voted for Trump: feds

Federal prosecutors on Thursday charged two Iranian nationals with sending out emails to voters that threatened them with violence unless they supported former President Donald Trump in 2020.

As NBC News reports, the emails were sent out last fall and were purportedly from the far-right Proud Boys gang, whom Trump infamously told to "stand back and stand by" during his first debate with President Joe Biden.

In reality, however, the emails were sent by Iranians Seyyed Mohammad Hosein Musa Kazemi and Sajjad Kashian, who were allegedly trying to compromise voter registration websites in 12 states.

"This indictment details how two Iran-based actors waged a targeted, coordinated campaign to erode confidence in the integrity of the U.S. electoral system and to sow discord among Americans," explained Assistant Attorney General Matthew G. Olsen of the Justice Department's National Security Division. "The allegations illustrate how foreign disinformation campaigns operate and seek to influence the American public. The department is committed to exposing and disrupting malign foreign influence efforts using all available tools, including criminal charges."

Although the indictment of the two men does not say that they were working on behalf of the Iranian government, NBC News notes that other intelligence officials in the past have linked the scheme to an Iranian intelligence operation.

https://www.rawstory.com/trump-iran-2655761024/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4415 on: November 19, 2021, 12:35:05 AM »
Criminal Donald gets more toxic by the day and even amongst his own radical right wing base. Last year 27% of Republicans said they didn't want Trump to be their candidate. Fast forward to a year later and it's soared up to 40% that don't want him. But the number that stands out is 71% of Americans can't stand him. Guess we won't be hearing the ridiculous Trump 2024 chants anymore. 

Americans are united in belief Trump shouldn't run again — but GOPers want him anyway: report

Donald Trump is putting the GOP in a bind as he continues to explore mounting a political comeback in 2024.

"A Marquette Law School Poll survey of adults nationwide finds a majority of Republicans wanting former President Donald Trump to run for president in 2024, although a majority of all adults in the survey say they do not want him to run. Among all respondents, 28% would like to see Trump make another run for the presidency, while 71% do not want him to run again," the school announced on Thursday.

While Trump remains toxic with voters overall, he still maintains a tight grasp on the Republican Party, with 60% of Republicans wanting to see him run again.

The poll also showed that 68% of Independents have an unfavorable opinion of Trump.

https://www.marquette.edu/news-center/2021/new-marquette-law-poll-finds-majority-of-republicans-favor-a-trump-run-for-president-in-2024.php

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4416 on: November 19, 2021, 03:46:27 AM »
Rudy Giuliani’s star voter fraud witness in Michigan may not have even voted
https://www.rawstory.com/voter-fraud-witness-hasnt-voted/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4417 on: November 20, 2021, 12:26:17 AM »
Tide is turning against Trump as GOP heavyweights increasingly call him out



According to CNN's political analyst Frida Ghitis, recent comments by a pair of conservative heavyweights about moving beyond Donald Trump may be just the beginning of a movement to leave the former president in the past because he has too much baggage to be re-electable in 2024.

Of particular note are comments made this week by Rupert Murdoch -- whose Fox News gave Trump a major boost that led to victory in 2016 -- only to have a falling out in 2020 when Trump lost his re-election bid.

Writing "It is noteworthy that in the past few days we have heard from two major figures in the conservative camp telling Trump that he should stop whining about the election he lost and let the Republican Party focus on real issues, instead of his self-serving fantasies," Ghitis quotes Murdoch complaining about who should lead the party saying, "It is crucial that conservatives play an active, forceful role in that debate, but that will not happen if President Trump stays focused on the past."

Add that to former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie hitting every cable show to promote his book "Republican Rescue: Saving the Party from Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden" that seems as much a jab at Trump as it does President Joe Biden, and the analyst suggests Trump's career as a viable candidate may be waning even as he leads in the polls among Republicans.

"Murdoch and Christie are not the first Republicans who have stood up to the former president -- but their rebukes of Trump are markedly different, "she wrote before suggesting, but in the long run, they might set off a wave.

Writing, "it is remarkable that they have done the calculus and decided they can benefit from speaking out against the former president, even after other Republicans have been badly hurt by doing the same thing," she then added, "I think their calculation makes sense."

Explaining that Republicans may be "doomed" if they stick with Trump, she stated that --when the 2024 election comes around -- voters will once again be put in a position of deciding if they want to vote for the man who created so much chaos for four years.

"Biden may look uninspiring now, but the former president, who had the most consistently poor approval ratings of any president in the modern era, remains highly unpopular and controversial," she wrote before adding another concern for Republicans willing to bet the house on the former president.

"Do Republicans want a candidate embroiled in endless -- and serious -- legal troubles?" she wrote before detailing Trump's legal problems in Washington D.C., New York and Georgia that could make a 2024 presidential campaign, at best problematic.

"One-third of Republicans and 92% of Democrats don't want him to be a major national political figure going forward. That's not the arithmetic of victory," she wrote before predicting, "There's the potential for a post-Trump Republican Party to gain ground. It still seems like a long shot at this point, but if his critics are successful in persuading the GOP to move in a different direction, there's a chance American democracy can return some semblance of normality, where political leaders debate what policies are best for the country, without fear of upsetting the tender, explosive feelings of a very bad loser.

https://www.rawstory.com/trump-gop-2024/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4418 on: November 21, 2021, 03:11:06 AM »
'White male violence' is paralyzing America



According to CNN analyst John Blake, one of the most potent political forces in the U.S. is "white male anger" that has Americans looking over their shoulders and living in fear of what comes next.

Linking together the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse -- who was found not guilty in the killing of two Black Lives Matter protesters -- with the Ahmaud Arbery trial in Georgia and the civil case against the organizers of the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Blake concluded, "There is nothing more frightening in America today than an angry White man."

"It's not the 'radical Islamic terrorist' that I fear the most. Nor is it the brown immigrant or the fiery Black Lives Matter protester, or whatever the latest bogeyman is that some politician tells me I should dread. It's encountering an armed White man in public who has been inspired by the White men on trial in these three cases," he wrote.

Adding that there is "nothing inherently violent about White men, or any human being," the CNN contributor said recent events should not only give everyone pause but should lead the country to ask how we reached the point that White men "feel as if they can rule and brutalize without consequence."

Detailing America's history of brutality, Blake said that -- with the attack on the Capitol on Jan 6th by supporters of Donald Trump -- the problem is growing worse instead of getting better.

"Talking about assaulting and killing political enemies has become so normal -- and seemingly acceptable -- in conservative circles today that a White man felt comfortable enough to ask a right-wing activist at a public forum in Idaho last month: 'When do we get to use the guns? ... How many elections are they going to steal before we kill these people?'" he wrote before adding, "We have enough problems with White male violence as it is. Mass shootings in the US are committed more often by White men than by any other group. Top law enforcement officials now say the nation's biggest domestic terror threat comes from White supremacists. And many of the most indelible news images of recent years include angry, red-faced White men, often armed with guns."

"Look at these three trials, because they point to one frightening future," he added before concluding, "This is what that future looks like: More angry White men emboldened by "stand your ground" and citizen's arrest laws, inspired by a conservative interpretation of the Second Amendment. And more dead Americans."

You can read the whole piece here:
https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/20/us/angry-white-men-trials-blake-cec/index.html

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory - Part 2
« Reply #4419 on: November 21, 2021, 11:29:53 PM »
It's good to see Democrats hitting the airwaves and finally stating what I've been saying all along. Criminal Donald, the GOP, and the right wing media are purposely pushing harmful disinformation about the vaccines so their followers won't get vaccinated. They are doing it to suppress the economy so they can sabotage President Biden. And as a result, they are killing off their own supporters. It's about time Dems are speaking out about this pro death GOP cult.

‘Blood on his hands’: Fox News guest accuses Trump of 'ghoulish' plot to win the midterms

Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA) told Fox News on Sunday that former President Donald Trump is guilty of a "ghoulish" attempt to undermine the economy by downplaying the need for Covid-19 vaccinations.

"Next year, we may see a larger Democratic majority as people understand that what Donald Trump is doing today -- and the man has blood on his hands -- is trying to suppress our economy by convincing Americans not to get vaccinated," Sherman explained to host Mike Emanuel. "It's part of a ghoulish political strategy to depress the economy and depress Democratic vote and I don't think it will work."

For his part, Emanuel ignored the theory and moved on to a question about inflation.

Although Trump has been vaccinated for Covid-19, he is on record suggesting that the vaccines cannot be trusted by people who believe the 2020 election was stolen.

Watch the video below from Fox News:


 

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