Users Currently Browsing This Topic:
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Author Topic: Bugliosi's "Conclusion of No Conspiracy" 12 of 32 Kennedy family supports the WC  (Read 92 times)

Offline John Mytton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 988



12. In a similar vein, we know from common sense and the experience of our lives, that more than anything else, survivors of a murder victim want the person or persons who killed their loved one to be brought to justice. What reason do we have for believing that the Kennedy family is any different? (As President Kennedy’s brother Robert said, “Nobody is more interested than I in knowing who is responsible for the death of President Kennedy.”)36 Yet conspiracy theorists, without any evidence to support their position, are apparently convinced that John F. Kennedy’s survivors are an exception. (Indeed, several are so crazy as to believe that RFK actually knew who killed his brother and joined in the conspiracy to cover it up.)37       

It is noteworthy, then, that the Kennedy family has been supportive of the Warren Commission’s conclusion that Oswald acted alone. Because of Bobby Kennedy’s fierce opposition to organized crime, which his brother the president supported, and because of JFK’s efforts, with RFK’s help, to remove Castro from power in Cuba, and with the concomitant dissatisfaction with JFK by the CIA and anti-Castro Cuban exiles over the administration’s failure to provide air support during the Bay of Pigs invasion, RFK’s first instinct—there have been too many reports from various sources to deny this—immediately after the assassination was to suspect a possible retaliatory killing by one of the people or groups he went after. However, after the coffee cooled and the FBI and Warren Commission investigated the assassination, he issued the following statement to the media on September 27, 1964: “I am convinced [Lee Harvey] Oswald was solely responsible for what happened and that he did not have any outside help or assistance. I have not read the report, nor do I intend to. But I have been briefed on it and I am completely satisfied that the Commission investigated every lead and examined every piece of evidence. The [Warren] Commission’s inquiry was thorough and conscientious.”38 RFK, who undoubtedly knew every one of the seven Commission members personally, had no doubt about their integrity in this case, while thousands of conspiracy theorists down through the years, 99.9 percent of whom never knew even one, much less all seven, deeply distrust them.       

Perhaps one thing speaks louder than any words, however, with respect to RFK’s feelings. During the entire Warren Commission period, he was the nation’s attorney general, the chief law enforcement officer in the land with jurisdiction over the FBI, the main investigative arm for the Commission. If at any time he had sensed that the Warren Commission and the FBI weren’t doing enough or the right things, wouldn’t he have automatically put pressure on them to do so? I would think he would do this even if the victim were not his brother—all the more so when it was. But he never did. Does that not speak volumes? Not only did he not do anything, but in a letter to the Warren Commission on August 4, 1964, he affirmatively told the commissioners he could “state definitely that I know of no credible evidence to support the allegations that the assassination of President Kennedy was caused by a domestic or foreign conspiracy,” adding that “I have no suggestions to make at this time regarding an additional investigation which should be undertaken by the Commission prior to the publication of its report.”       

The president’s youngest brother, Senator Edward Kennedy, told Time magazine in 1975, “There were things that should have been done differently. There were mistakes made. But I know of no facts that have been brought to light which would call for a reassessment of the conclusion. I’m fundamentally satisfied with the findings of the Warren Commission.”39       

What about JFK Jr., the slain president’s son? Since he literally grew up at the feet of his elders in the Kennedy family, if the sense throughout the years was that his father had been murdered as a result of a conspiracy, surely JFK Jr. would have known about it. And just as surely, the late son of the president would look favorably on someone like Oliver Stone, who ostensibly was trying to do everything he could to uncover that conspiracy. But when JFK Jr.’s staff at his magazine, George, asked him to interview Stone to help get the fledgling magazine off the ground in its second issue in November of 1995, thinking it would be a blockbuster commercial success, JFK Jr. balked. When his aides persisted, he agreed to have dinner with Stone at Rockenwagner, a Santa Monica, California, restaurant, and when Stone asked John Jr. rhetorically whether he really believed Oswald alone had killed his father, adding that there had to be a conspiracy, John excused himself and walked away. After he returned, the dinner was politely brought to a close as soon as possible. John later told his aides, “I just couldn’t sit across a table from that man for two hours. I just couldn’t,” and Stone was not interviewed for the magazine. John’s biographer, Richard Blow, who worked with him at the magazine, said that Stone “made John feel like Captain Kirk being stalked by the world’s looniest Trekkie.”40       

It’s instructive, is it not, that the Warren Commission’s conclusion of no conspiracy in the assassination is accepted by the brothers and son of the murdered president, but categorically rejected by thousands of conspiracy theorists who were strangers to the president?
RHVB




JohnM

JFK Assassination Forum


Online Martin Weidmann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 573
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


12. In a similar vein, we know from common sense and the experience of our lives, that more than anything else, survivors of a murder victim want the person or persons who killed their loved one to be brought to justice. What reason do we have for believing that the Kennedy family is any different? (As President Kennedy’s brother Robert said, “Nobody is more interested than I in knowing who is responsible for the death of President Kennedy.”)36 Yet conspiracy theorists, without any evidence to support their position, are apparently convinced that John F. Kennedy’s survivors are an exception. (Indeed, several are so crazy as to believe that RFK actually knew who killed his brother and joined in the conspiracy to cover it up.)37       

It is noteworthy, then, that the Kennedy family has been supportive of the Warren Commission’s conclusion that Oswald acted alone. Because of Bobby Kennedy’s fierce opposition to organized crime, which his brother the president supported, and because of JFK’s efforts, with RFK’s help, to remove Castro from power in Cuba, and with the concomitant dissatisfaction with JFK by the CIA and anti-Castro Cuban exiles over the administration’s failure to provide air support during the Bay of Pigs invasion, RFK’s first instinct—there have been too many reports from various sources to deny this—immediately after the assassination was to suspect a possible retaliatory killing by one of the people or groups he went after. However, after the coffee cooled and the FBI and Warren Commission investigated the assassination, he issued the following statement to the media on September 27, 1964: “I am convinced [Lee Harvey] Oswald was solely responsible for what happened and that he did not have any outside help or assistance. I have not read the report, nor do I intend to. But I have been briefed on it and I am completely satisfied that the Commission investigated every lead and examined every piece of evidence. The [Warren] Commission’s inquiry was thorough and conscientious.”38 RFK, who undoubtedly knew every one of the seven Commission members personally, had no doubt about their integrity in this case, while thousands of conspiracy theorists down through the years, 99.9 percent of whom never knew even one, much less all seven, deeply distrust them.       

Perhaps one thing speaks louder than any words, however, with respect to RFK’s feelings. During the entire Warren Commission period, he was the nation’s attorney general, the chief law enforcement officer in the land with jurisdiction over the FBI, the main investigative arm for the Commission. If at any time he had sensed that the Warren Commission and the FBI weren’t doing enough or the right things, wouldn’t he have automatically put pressure on them to do so? I would think he would do this even if the victim were not his brother—all the more so when it was. But he never did. Does that not speak volumes? Not only did he not do anything, but in a letter to the Warren Commission on August 4, 1964, he affirmatively told the commissioners he could “state definitely that I know of no credible evidence to support the allegations that the assassination of President Kennedy was caused by a domestic or foreign conspiracy,” adding that “I have no suggestions to make at this time regarding an additional investigation which should be undertaken by the Commission prior to the publication of its report.”       

The president’s youngest brother, Senator Edward Kennedy, told Time magazine in 1975, “There were things that should have been done differently. There were mistakes made. But I know of no facts that have been brought to light which would call for a reassessment of the conclusion. I’m fundamentally satisfied with the findings of the Warren Commission.”39       

What about JFK Jr., the slain president’s son? Since he literally grew up at the feet of his elders in the Kennedy family, if the sense throughout the years was that his father had been murdered as a result of a conspiracy, surely JFK Jr. would have known about it. And just as surely, the late son of the president would look favorably on someone like Oliver Stone, who ostensibly was trying to do everything he could to uncover that conspiracy. But when JFK Jr.’s staff at his magazine, George, asked him to interview Stone to help get the fledgling magazine off the ground in its second issue in November of 1995, thinking it would be a blockbuster commercial success, JFK Jr. balked. When his aides persisted, he agreed to have dinner with Stone at Rockenwagner, a Santa Monica, California, restaurant, and when Stone asked John Jr. rhetorically whether he really believed Oswald alone had killed his father, adding that there had to be a conspiracy, John excused himself and walked away. After he returned, the dinner was politely brought to a close as soon as possible. John later told his aides, “I just couldn’t sit across a table from that man for two hours. I just couldn’t,” and Stone was not interviewed for the magazine. John’s biographer, Richard Blow, who worked with him at the magazine, said that Stone “made John feel like Captain Kirk being stalked by the world’s looniest Trekkie.”40       

It’s instructive, is it not, that the Warren Commission’s conclusion of no conspiracy in the assassination is accepted by the brothers and son of the murdered president, but categorically rejected by thousands of conspiracy theorists who were strangers to the president?
RHVB




JohnM

What a pathetic argument to make. The Kennedy family allegedly supports the WC finding so those findings must be true….. Wow!

What information did the Kennedys have (that we don't have) to even make that determination (if they ever truly did) to begin with?
« Last Edit: June 26, 2018, 01:45:35 AM by Martin Weidmann »

Offline John Iacoletti

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2038
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
What a pathetic argument to make. The Kennedy family allegedly supports the WC finding so those findings must be true….. Wow!

What information did the Kennedys have (that we don't have) to even make that determination (if they ever truly did) to begin with?

[img width=60 height=60 ]https://emojipedia-us.s3.amazonaws.com/thumbs/120/emoji-one/104/thumbs-up-sign_1f44d.png[/img]

Fallacious Bugliosi Argument #12 - false appeal to authority

JFK Assassination Forum