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Author Topic: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer  (Read 118808 times)

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1880 on: March 21, 2020, 03:56:28 PM »
There's the same amount of evidence pointing the finger towards Crafard as Oswald, Crafard fleeing Dallas the morning after, admitting he was once employed as a mob hitman ( Tippit shooting was a professional hit) 3 to the chest and 1 to the head to finish him off mafia style. Always thought the head shot was a massive clue, if it was Oswald he'd have been happy nullifying Tippit with the 3 shots to aid him get away, absolutely no need for the execution shot unless he was determined that Tippit could never identify him ( hardly the work of a crazed assassin hurriedly fleeing the scene. I believe Tippit's job was to kill the fleeing Oswald, once this didn't happen the plan was quickly put in place to kill Tippit leaving conveniently Oswald's wallet behind at the scene. Tippit's bizarre behaviour beforehand was testament to a guy pretty much out of control pulling cars over like a maniac searching them etc, making rash calls the works. Tippit was knee deep in this conspiracy 100%.

admitting he was once employed as a mob hitman

David, I'm not challenging you on this point simply to embarrass you or send you on a fools errand.....BUT   I sincerely would like to know where you picked up the idea that Larry Crafard admitted that he'd killed someone for the mob.  I certainly can believe that, because I believe that Crawfard was a worthless lowlife, but I'd love to have it verified that he admitted being a hitman..

Online David Monaghan

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1881 on: March 21, 2020, 05:13:03 PM »
admitting he was once employed as a mob hitman

David, I'm not challenging you on this point simply to embarrass you or send you on a fools errand.....BUT   I sincerely would like to know where you picked up the idea that Larry Crafard admitted that he'd killed someone for the mob.  I certainly can believe that, because I believe that Crawfard was a worthless lowlife, but I'd love to have it verified that he admitted being a hitman..
Hi Walt, it's in Joan Mellen's book , a farewell to justice, Crafard admitted to an investigator Peter Whitmey that he was a hitman in the early 60s, his own brother admitted this a few years later and added his brother was heavily involved in the events of that weekend in November. It's worth noting that Crafard while in the army was a crack shot, Could Crafard have been the fella Craig saw running towards the rambler after the shooting I wonder??

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1882 on: March 21, 2020, 05:42:33 PM »
Hi Walt, it's in Joan Mellen's book , a farewell to justice, Crafard admitted to an investigator Peter Whitmey that he was a hitman in the early 60s, his own brother admitted this a few years later and added his brother was heavily involved in the events of that weekend in November. It's worth noting that Crafard while in the army was a crack shot, Could Crafard have been the fella Craig saw running towards the rambler after the shooting I wonder??

FWIW.....   Crafard had been working with carnivals for years....  Where  he'd learned to be a crack shot and a quick draw artist. Tippit's killer definitely was very fast on the draw. (He fired four shots into the kill zone before Tippit could draw his weapon.)   This action is proof that Tippit's killer was an expert quick draw ( which eliminates Lee Oswald)

I doubt that Crafard was the man who climbed into the Rambler, but I do believe that Larry Crafard could have been at the corner of 10th & Patton at 1:05 pm that day.  The big stumbling block in suspecting Crafard of being the killer who shot Tippit is the fact that he escaped Dallas alive.    If he had killed Tippit I sincerely doubt that he would have got out of Dallas alive.....   However...OTOH the fact hat he hastily grabbed a hand full of change from Ruby's desk and went to the highway and started hitch hiking north to the sparsely settled woods of Michigan simply screams of his guilt in the events of 11/22/63.     

Offline Bill Chapman

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1883 on: March 22, 2020, 01:30:57 AM »
Dirty Harry
Dirty Harvey
Dirty Larry

Love the synergy!

Offline Izraul Hidashi

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1884 on: March 26, 2020, 05:28:24 AM »
The officer's name is Tippit.... just saying!

Yes, thank you. Mr. Tippet was my elementary school principle in Santa Barbara. My mistake. Clearly the most important part.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 07:08:06 AM by Izraul Hidashi »

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Lee Oswald The Cop Killer
« Reply #1885 on: April 10, 2020, 04:20:54 PM »
Helen Markham was on foot, walking south along Patton toward her bus stop, which
was on Jefferson Boulevard.  Markham was just reaching the northwest corner of
Tenth and Patton when she noticed Tippit's patrol car pass through the
intersection, heading east along Tenth Street.  Markham testified that the
patrol car pulled up to a man who was walking on the sidewalk on the south side
of Tenth Street.  Helen Markham positively identified Lee Oswald as the man she
saw talking to, and shoot, J.D. Tippit.  She testified that she saw Oswald run
from the scene, heading down Patton with a gun in his hand.
 
William Scoggins was sitting in his cab at the southeast corner of Tenth and
Patton.  Scoggins saw Tippit's patrol car pass slowly in front of his cab,
driving west to east along Tenth Street (Scoggins' cab was sitting on Patton,
facing north towards Tenth street).  Scoggins noticed that the patrol car pulled
up alongside a man who was walking on the sidewalk on the south side of Tenth
Street.  William Scoggins positively identified Lee Oswald as the man he saw
running towards his cab seconds after hearing gun shots.  Scoggins got out of
his cab with thoughts of running from the scene as Oswald headed straight
towards him after the shots rang out.  After realizing he had nowhere to hide,
Scoggins returned to his cab and ducked down behind it as he watched Oswald turn
the corner and head down Patton towards Jefferson.  Scoggins testified that
Oswald had a gun in his hand.
 
Barbara Davis was lying in bed inside her residence, which was the house at the
corner of Tenth and Patton.  She heard gunshots outside and went to the door.
She opened the screen door and noticed Helen
Markham across the street, screaming.  Davis then noticed a man cutting through
her front yard, holding a gun in his hands.  She testified that the man had the
gun cocked in his hands as if he were emptying it.  Barbara Davis positively
identified Lee Oswald as the man who she saw cut across her yard with a gun in
his hands.
 
Virginia Davis was in the living room of her residence (400 E. Tenth
St.) when she heard gunshots outside.  Virginia Davis went to the door
and, like Barbara, noticed Helen Markham across the street, screaming.  Davis
then noticed a man cutting across the front yard with a gun in his hands.  She
testified that the man was emptying shells out of the gun.  Virginia Davis
positively identified Lee Oswald as the man who she saw cut across the front
yard with a gun in his hands.
 
Ted Callaway was standing out on the front porch of the used-car lot office,
where he worked.  Callaway testified that he heard five pistol shots.  Callaway
testified that he believed the shots came from the vicinity of Tenth Street,
which was behind the office he worked in.  He went out to the sidewalk on the
east side of Patton and noticed Scoggin's cab parked up near the corner of
Patton at Tenth.  As Callaway watched the cab driver (Scoggins) hide beside his
cab, he noticed a man running across Patton from the east side of Patton to the
west side.  Callaway watched the man run down Patton towards Jefferson.  Ted
Callaway positively identified Lee Oswald as the man he saw run down Patton with
a gun in his hands.
 
Sam Guinyard worked at the same used-car lot as Ted Callaway.  Guinyard was out
on the lot washing one of the cars when he heard gunshots come from the
direction up toward Tenth Street.  From the car lot, Guinyard was looking north
toward Tenth in an attempt to see where the shots came from when he saw a man on
the sidewalk in between the first two houses on Tenth Street (400 E. Tenth and
404 E. Tenth).  Guinyard went toward the sidewalk on the east side of Patton and
saw the man cut across the yard of the house on the corner (400 E. Tenth, the
Davis residence) and proceeded to run south on Patton.  Guinyard said the man
had a gun in his hands and was emptying it of shells.  Sam Guinyard positively
identified Lee Oswald as the man he saw running with the gun in his hands.

Each of the above witnesses saw a man flee the vicinity of the Tippit murder.  Each of the above witnesses saw a gun in the man's hands.  Every single one of the above witnesses positively identified Lee Oswald as that man.

These are the real witnesses and not even one of them said that someone other than Lee Oswald was the man they saw.

As for the revolver, Jim Leavelle briefly spoke with Oswald when Oswald was brought in from the theater.  Leavelle told Oswald that they could run ballistic tests on the revolver and match the revolver to the bullets taken from the officer's body, proving that the revolver taken from Oswald was the revolver responsible for the officer's death.  Oswald did not deny owning the revolver.  According to Leavelle, Oswald's only reply was "Well, you're just going to have to do it."

Oswald ordered the revolver under the name of A.J. Hidell on 1/27/63 from Seaport Traders, Inc.  Treasury Department handwriting expert Alwyn Cole testified that the handwriting on the order coupon belonged to Lee Oswald.  The FBI's handwriting expert James Cadigan also testified that the handwriting on the coupon was Oswald's.

On the order, there was the name of a D.F. Drittal, written in the section where a witness states that the person buying the weapon (Hidell) was a U.S. citizen and was not a felon.  The handwriting experts, Cole and Cadigan, both testified that the name D.F. Drittal was also written in Oswald's hands.

The revolver was shipped to a post office box in Dallas rented by Lee Oswald.  Cole testified that the signature and the handwriting on the post office box application belonged to Oswald.

Postal Inspector Harry Holmes testified that Oswald had previously rented a post office box in New Orleans, during the summer of 1963.  Oswald's New Orleans application and his Dallas application were found.  Unlike the Dallas post office box application, the New Orleans post office box application still had the portion which listed others who were able to receive mail at that post office box.  In the New Orleans application, Oswald included the names of both Marina Oswald and A.J. Hidell as those able to receive mail in that box.

Holmes spoke with Oswald on Sunday morning, the 24th.  Holmes asked Oswald about the Dallas post office box.  Oswald stated that he was the only one who received mail at that box and that he didn't receive any mail there that was addressed to any name other than his true name.  Holmes then asked Oswald about the box that Oswald rented in New Orleans earlier that year.  Oswald again stated that he was the only one permitted to receive mail at that p.o. box.  Holmes reminded Oswald that he (Oswald) had listed Marina Oswald as a person eligible to receive mail in that box.  Oswald's reply was basically "Well so what?  She was my wife and I see nothing wrong with that."  Holmes then reminded Oswald that one "A.J. Hidell" was also listed in the section on the application listing others eligible to receive mail in that post office box.  Holmes said that Oswald replied "I don't recall anything about that".

Oswald was caught in a lie.  The handwriting which permitted A.J. Hidell to receive mail at the New Orleans post office box belonged to Lee Oswald (per experts Cole and Cadigan).

Ballistic testing can determine whether or not an empty shell casing was fired from a specific weapon to the exclusion of every other weapon in the entire world.  Before shooting, the shell casing is placed against the breech face and the firing pin.  When the pin strikes the primer, the bullet is fired off and the shell casing is thrust against the breech face of the weapon.  This causes a permanent mark on the base of the empty shell, i.e. the distinctive fine lines etched onto the breech face put their "fingerprint" on the base of the empty shell.

Joseph Nicol (Superintendent of the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation for the State of Illinois) along with Cortlandt Cunningham, Robert Frazier and Charles Killion (of the Firearms Identification Unit of the FBI Laboratory in Washington D.C.) each examined the shells found at the Tippit scene and Oswald's revolver, which he ordered from Seaport Traders, Inc.  Each of these experts determined that the shells were linked (through ballistics) to Oswald's revolver, to the exclusion of every other weapon in the world.


When a person has to distort the record ( As Bill Brown has done) it's a sure sign that the person is dishonest.....
 Let's correct Bill's distorted tale.

Helen Markham was on foot, walking south along Patton toward her bus stop, which was on Jefferson Boulevard.  Markham was just reaching the northwest corner of
Tenth and Patton when she noticed Tippit's patrol car  , (as he tailed a man who was walking east on the sidewalk on the south side of tenth. ) pass through the
intersection, heading east along Tenth Street.  Markham testified that the patrol car pulled up to a man who was walking on the sidewalk on the south side
of Tenth Street.  Helen Markham positively identified Lee Oswald as the man she saw talking to, and shoot, J.D. Tippit. (Actually Markham did no such thing..... She said she felt cold chills when she viewed the line up....THAT is NOT a positive identification.) testified that she saw Tippit's killer run
from the scene, heading down Patton with a gun in his hand. ( All other witnesses said that the killer WALKED AWAY ...he did not run.)

And just so you'll have accurate information to help you from making a fool of yourself in the future Mr Brown......I call your attention to the descriptions of the eyewitnesses who saw Tippit's killer walking away from the scene..... They all said that the killer removed ONE SHELL AT A TIME from his revolver ....That indicates that the killer was NOT using a Smith & Wesson revolver, because the S&W ejects all six chambers at once.   

 

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