Author Topic: Framing a patsy  (Read 40293 times)

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Offline Gary Craig

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2012, 08:29:12 PM »
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OK, let's say for the sake of argument that Oswald was on the first floor during the shooting and strolled up to the second floor to get a Coke when confronted by Baker. What else must be or is in all probability true?

1. Howard Brennan gave an Oswald-like description of the shooter who was nonetheless not Oswald. (They used an Oswald "double.")
2. No one else saw this Oswald-like character leave the building. (Could have hidden and been ferried out later.)
3. This Oswald-looking character used Oswald's real rifle for the assassination, or alternatively, this rifle was later linked to Oswald by massive fabrication of evidence and the lying of witnesses.
4. The conspirators needed to make sure Oswald remained out of sight during the motorcade. (I suppose you could have lured Oswald there under false pretenses.)

After the assassination, and after going to get a Coke (for whatever reason), Oswald suddenly realizes that he's the patsy. He flees and the rest of the scenario happens basically as the Warren Report says.

OK, you just need to fabricate all the evidence connecting the rifle to Oswald. Well, the backyard photos are real. And Oswald is NOT going to turn over his real rifle to an assassin and then wait on the first floor.

I don't see how you can get Oswald's real rifle on the sixth floor and Oswald on the first floor.


Re: Framing a patsy

A more important question; Who turned off Oswald's "Flash Card"?

"JFK AND THE UNSPEAKABLE
Why He Died And Why It Matters"

By James W. Douglas
p.177

-snip-

"On October 9, 1963, one week before Lee Harvey Oswald began his job at a site overlooking the president's future parade route,
an FBI official in Washington, D.C., disconnected Oswald from a federal alarm system that was about to identify him as a threat to
national security. The FBI man's name was Marvin Gheesling. He was a supervisor in the Soviet espionage section at FBI headquarters.
His timing was remarkable. As author John Newman remarked in an analysis of this phenomenon, Gheesling "turned off the alarm switch
on Oswald literally an instant before it would have gone off."




Canceling LHO's Flash Card allowed him to go unnoticed at the TSBD,

directly on JFK's parade route, despite reports like the 2 below coming from Mexico City.




Offline Anthony Marsh

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #71 on: September 06, 2012, 11:03:54 PM »
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:cop: He didn't just "slide it between some boxes". He took the time to make a slot for it out of boxes and then stacked other boxes atop of that.

And what "actions" led to him being suspected and arrested for the murder of JFK? Drinking a Coke in the 2nd floor lunchroom?

You don't know that for a fact. And there was room enough to simply slip it between the boxes. You are making a big deal out the difference between 2 seconds and 5 seconds.

Online Richard Smith

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #72 on: September 07, 2012, 12:13:35 AM »
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It doesn't matter what you think Oswald thought fortunate or not Richard. The fact remains that he got out of the building when you guys thought he wouldn't. What does that tell you other than you think he got lucky? Could it also mean he didn't shoot JFK and that is why he got away. You LN's need to sit down and admit that no one saw him come down those stairs and that Brennan is delusional if he claims to know Oswald's height when he never saw him standing. Brennan is your 15 minutes of fame witness and he has got a book to prove it. The shells automatically alerted the DPD to maybe look for a rifle on the 6th. Had there been no witnesses how else are you going to know where the shots came from?

No one saw anyone come down the stairs.  Oswald or otherwise.  Does that prove no one assassinated JFK and he is still alive?  That's a very silly line of logic.  The gun and bullets are there.  Witnesses place a shooter on the 6th floor.  So we know someone was there and got out of the building.  Oswald is the missing guy.   

Online Jerry Organ

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #73 on: September 07, 2012, 12:45:41 AM »
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"When I did--I had my light in my hand. I was slinging it around on the floor, and I caught a glimpse of the rifle, stuffed down between two rows of boxes with another box or so pulled over the top of it. And I hollered that the rifle was here."

What part of this are you having trouble comprehending?

You think Oswald "took the time to make a slot for it out of boxes"? Hilarious. You've been putting too much bark in your soup.



The "slot" extended for about 20 feet and was noticeable to anyone walking W along the N wall. The very bottom of the slot wasn't evident, which may explain why it eluded notice for while (rifle position's slot arrowed above). Cartons were roughly stacked there temporarily so as to get access to a floor section at a time that they were covering with new plywood.

Eugene Boone, then 75, said in an interview last year: "It looked like someone had moved some of the boxes over slightly, to make a sort of hiding spot. It is my belief that Oswald created this pre-made spot so he could just toss the rifle on his way to the stairwell."

Seems he's unaware of the floor-laying crew having to shift boxes.

Like Marsh said, plenty of room to slip it between the boxes.



Offline Colin Crow

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #74 on: September 07, 2012, 01:03:23 AM »
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You think Oswald "took the time to make a slot for it out of boxes"? Hilarious. You've been putting too much bark in your soup.



The "slot" extended for about 20 feet and was noticeable to anyone walking W along the N wall. The very bottom of the slot wasn't evident, which may explain why it eluded notice for while (rifle position's slot arrowed above). Cartons were roughly stacked there temporarily so as to get access to a floor section at a time that they were covering with new plywood.

Eugene Boone, then 75, said in an interview last year: "It looked like someone had moved some of the boxes over slightly, to make a sort of hiding spot. It is my belief that Oswald created this pre-made spot so he could just toss the rifle on his way to the stairwell."

Seems he's unaware of the floor-laying crew having to shift boxes.

Like Marsh said, plenty of room to slip it between the boxes.




Mr. BOONE - Well, I proceeded to the east end of the building, I guess, and started working our way across the building to the west wall, looking in, under, and around all the boxes and pallets, and what-have-you that were on the floor. Looking for the weapon. And as I got to the west wall, there were a row of windows there, and a slight space between some boxes and the wall. I squeezed through them.
When I did--I had my light in my hand. I was slinging it around on the floor, and I caught a glimpse of the rifle, stuffed down between two rows of boxes with another box or so pulled over the top of it. And I hollered that the rifle was here.



It seems that the hiding of the rifle was not merely a simple positioning between the boxes as seen in the SS reenactment. Some slight rearranging was done to partially cover the rifle from above. It looks like this involved shifting 2 boxes. As Anthony said it likely added a few seconds to do this.

Offline Bill Brown

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #75 on: September 07, 2012, 02:41:56 AM »
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"When I did--I had my light in my hand. I was slinging it around on the floor, and I caught a glimpse of the rifle, stuffed down between two rows of boxes with another box or so pulled over the top of it. And I hollered that the rifle was here."

What part of this are you having trouble comprehending?

You said:

"buried beneath a stack of boxes"    :cuckoo:

Why don't you take a moment to show any portion of Boone's testimony where he says that the rifle was "buried beneath a stack of boxes".  Until you do this, the comprehension problem is very obviously yours.

Offline Bob Mady

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Re: Framing a patsy
« Reply #76 on: September 07, 2012, 02:42:58 AM »
I don't understand why the sniper would attempt to hide the rifle.
The sniper had just fired a number of times with the gun barrel projecting out a window on the sixth floor of the building in view of 200-600 witnesses that he would have to assume would have looked up when the shots were fired in order to locate the source of the sound? Why not drop the gun and walk away?
It's just me, but it seems that I would assume that the TSBD would have been stormed by every cop in the city within minutes.
The hulls were left on the floor, why take the time to wipe the rifle down and then hide it?
Oswald had to be smart enough to realize he would be the number 1 suspect with his history, even if he didn't do it.