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Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #400 on: October 02, 2022, 11:18:12 PM »
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'Hundreds of bodies': Lee County man says the sheriff is finding many dead Floridians after late evacuations



On Sunday, a Lee County man was working on clearing debris from his home when CNN's Jim Acosta approached him to ask how they fared through Hurricane Ian.

The man showed Acosta the damage to the home, the most significant parts were at the back of the home because the house is on a canal.

But it was the comments that the man made about deaths in the area that was the most shocking.

"Four doors down, their son's best friend is a Lee County sheriff, and they're finding hundreds of bodies now," the man told CNN. Acosta noted it's the same information that they are hearing too. "It is not like 20s. It is hundreds of bodies that they're getting in and looking."

Thus far, the death toll is 74 people and Acosta noted that the numbers are expected to increase dramatically. CNN also asked the Lee County Sheriff at a briefing about the death count and they dismissed the accusations that the evacuations of Ft. Meyers and Lee County didn't happen soon enough.

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #400 on: October 02, 2022, 11:18:12 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #401 on: April 03, 2023, 03:31:50 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #402 on: April 03, 2023, 10:29:34 PM »
Fox News lawyers won't be able to use key defense arguments when jury hears Dominion case

Speaking with MSNBC host Katie Phang on Sunday, Jeremy Peters of the New York Times stated that lawyers for Fox will enter the courtroom where the Dominion Voting Systems' $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit will be heard with their key defense points already made unavailable.

Reacting to a ruling on Friday that the case will be heard by a jury over Fox's protestations, host Phang stated, "Judge Eric Davis on Friday decimated much of Fox's potential trial defenses, ruling that Fox cannot invoke the neutral report privilege because the evidence does not support that Fox conducted good faith reporting. The judge also blocking Fox from using the fair reporting privilege because the statements made by Fox and its guests were not related to official proceedings."

Asked to explain what it means for the Fox lawyers, Peters replied, "When the jury gets the case several of Fox's key arguments will not be available for its lawyers to make."

"Several of these will have already been decided in Dominion''s favor because of the judge's decision on Friday," he explained. "So what this does is it significantly limits Fox's ability to mount a defense and leaves for the jury the key question of whether or not there is enough evidence to show that Fox hosts, producers and executives knew what they were putting on the air was false or at least recklessly disregarded information showing that it was false."

"That is how you get to potentially significant and sizeable judgment against Fox News," he added. "Dominion is asking for $1.6 billion and appears that, unless this settles, which I think it's highly unlikely at this point, and has already been highly unlikely because Fox appears to be preserving its options for appeal here, this is going to head to the jury and it will be one of the most significant and far-reaching defamation suits against a major media company that we have seen in decades."

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #402 on: April 03, 2023, 10:29:34 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #403 on: April 05, 2023, 08:12:26 AM »
Meet the next four people headed to the Moon – how the diverse crew of Artemis II shows NASA’s plan for the future of space exploration

https://theconversation.com/meet-the-next-four-people-headed-to-the-moon-how-the-diverse-crew-of-artemis-ii-shows-nasas-plan-for-the-future-of-space-exploration-203214

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #404 on: April 08, 2023, 10:23:41 AM »
Rings around Uranus! James Webb Space Telescope captures stunning image of ice giant (photo, video)

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has captured an amazing image of Uranus, showing in great detail the ice giant's ring system, its brightest moons and its dynamic atmosphere.

The new observation, made on Feb. 6, follows a similarly stunning photo JWST captured recently of the solar system's other ice giant, Neptune.

The new Uranus image shows 11 of the planet's 13 known rings, some of which are so bright that they blend together somewhat. What will really astound astronomers, however, is the fact that JWST's Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument is sensitive enough to have captured the innermost two of Uranus' dusty rings.

These faint rings have only been glimpsed by two other astronomical eyes — those of the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew past Uranus in 1986, and more recently by the advanced adaptive optics of the Keck Observatory.

When Voyager 2 imaged Uranus during its 1986 flyby, it saw the planet as little more than an inert blue marble lacking distinct features. This new JWST photo is a stark contrast, painting a picture of a dynamic and changing world.

The JWST image was made by combining data from two filters, which can be seen as the blue coloration and orange highlights, respectively. The representative-color image shows the dense icy fluid of water, methane, and ammonia above a small rocky core that comprises Uranus, which looks like a light blue snowball.



Uranus has a unique orbit in the solar system, with the ice giant rotating on its side, tilted at a roughly 90-degree angle respective to its path around the sun. This tilt causes Uranus to experience extreme seasons, with each pole exposed to constant sunlight for many years before being plunged into darkness for an equally long time.

Currently, it is spring at the northern pole of Uranus. This can be seen in the image, with the right side of the ice giant brightening at its north polar ice cap, which is facing toward the sun. This is the first time scientists have seen this aspect of the polar cap; it's missing from even the advanced images captured by Keck.

At the edge of the polar cap lies a bright cloud with some fainter extended features just about visible. This includes a second very bright cloud at the left limb of Uranus. Clouds like these are typical for Uranus and can be seen at infrared wavelengths; they are theorized to be connected to storm activity across the ice giant, JWST team members said. The northern pole of Uranus will experience its summer season beginning in 2028.

Watch Video: https://www.space.com/james-webb-space-telescope-uranus-rings-photo

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #404 on: April 08, 2023, 10:23:41 AM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #405 on: April 10, 2023, 06:47:29 AM »
Sea urchin die-off threatens reefs from Florida to Caribbean. Scientists hope to revive them



MIAMI — These days, long-spined sea urchins are known as the gardeners of the sea. They tend the algae on the coral reefs they call home, making sure it never overwhelms their hosts. Spotting one on the Florida reef tract is a good sign that nearby corals are doing OK.

Decades ago, their reputation was a little different. They were viewed as damaging nuisances — to divers and to reefs.

The first time marine scientist Don Levitan saw the reefs near the U.S. Virgin Islands, they were blanketed in black — the coral covered by thousands of urchins spiked with sharp, poisonous spines.

“It was so dense it looked like a reef of sea urchins,” said Levitan, a professor at Florida State University. “You couldn’t even walk into the water.”

That was in 1983, six months before a mysterious disease all but wiped out the population that reached throughout the Caribbean, including Florida’s reef tract. The average mortality rate across the Caribbean, he said, was 95%. In the following years, it would become clear that too few urchins would turn out to be worse for reefs than too many of them.

Now, after decades of gradual recovery, the population of this specific type of sea urchin, known formally as Diadema antillarum, has dramatically declined again. A recent paper led by Levitan, published in the journal of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that a die-off that began in early 2022 was equally devastating: 98% of the Diadema population was wiped out, once again.

That looms as another blow to struggling coral reefs across the entire region, including Florida.

Diadema are known as the “billy goats of the sea.” Their favorite food is the macroalgae that can clump along coral, cutting off the oxygen it needs to survive. Diadema are prolific grazers, and if there are enough of them around, they create little algae-free zones— also called halos — around coral that help them survive.

The corals also give back to the urchins. They provide nooks and crannies to hide from hungry predators like triggerfish or hogfish.

But Florida’s corals aren’t in great shape these days. Climate change has made ocean water hotter and more acidic, causing coral bleaching. The widespread and devastating stony coral tissue loss disease has weakened scores of once-strong reefs. And plumes of pollution from leaky septic tanks and sewage spills are choking out coral with too many nutrients.

That’s why, Levitan said, they need all the help they can get from Diadema. But unlike other spots in the Caribbean, Florida saw some of the slowest recovery between the first die-off in the 1980s and the second recent one, so the natural population is nearly nonexistent.

“Places like Florida, if you went diving or snorkeling in the Florida Keys between these two mortality events you just didn’t see many Diadema at all,” he said.

A collaboration of Florida scientists has been working to change that. It’s been a long, slow process without much success or funding, scientists say, but some recent wins have given new hope to the mission of reviving this species.

Diadema nursery

The first hurdle is trying to get the darn things to reproduce — and grow up — in an aquarium.

“Some of the best aquaculturists I know have been dabbling with these things for years,” said Ken Nedimeyer, technical director of Reef Rescue USA. “Most other urchins are easy to breed and raise, so easy, but Diadema are so hard.”

And the first few attempts to release those painstakingly raised Diadema into the wild didn’t exactly go well. Nedimeyer remembers one try 20 years ago where researchers loosed the urchins on a patch of restored reef. Within 24 hours, they were all gone.

It’s taken scientists a while to figure out exactly what went wrong there, but the biggest culprit was likely the other neighbors on the reefs.

“They’re kind of like chocolate-covered peanuts. Everybody likes to eat them on the reef. Fish like em, crabs like em,” Nedimeyer said. “They just can’t seem to get past the gauntlet of all the fish mouths trying to eat them.”

Scientists have tried all sorts of things to fix that, including providing urchins with tiny undersea houses made of concrete or turned-over terracotta pots. In one experiment, researchers even tied fishing lines to the released urchins to track whether having a hiding spot nearby helped them avoid predators. (It did.)

After watching several ill-fated releases, scientists like Nedimeyer realized there was another factor at play. The urchins raised in captivity didn’t behave like their wild cousins, and they were less equipped to survive.

“In the aquarium, they feed them squishy algae, like romaine lettuce for a manatee. We have to teach them to chew,” Nedimeyer said. “In the process of chewing the algae off the rock, they consume some calcium carbonate from the rock that strengthens their spines.”

Nedimeyer’s lab is currently working on that part of the equation, using a batch of aquarium-raised Diadema from Joshua Patterson, a University Florida researcher based at the Florida Aquarium who leads the state in raising the urchins. Reef Rescue is trying to turn the pea-sized urchins into “reef competent” juveniles it can one day release into the wild.

“These are one of the most important critters out there. They’re critical for the Caribbean,” Nedimeyer said.

At last, success

Some of the most recent advances are happening in Miami’s backyard, at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric and Earth Science. Inside, rows of lit aquarium tanks hold dozens of baby urchins, their black spines waving in the current.

Diego Lirman, an associate professor within UM’s marine biology and fisheries division, said his team has released two batches of lab-spawned Diadema from Patterson’s lab to test sites near Miami Beach, with a third release planned for the summer.

Scientists are tracking the urchins to see if they stay on the reefs and survive, or if they’re gobbled up by hungry predators instead.

While those results won’t be ready for some time, Lirman said he’s heartened by the results of the latest paper he worked on, which was published recently in the journal of the International Coral Reef Society. In it, a team of researchers showed that their efforts to drop adult Diadema on five reef spots near Key Biscayne were successful.

Those sites saw a nearly 30% drop in algae cover after three months, and after nine months, about 40 of the original 200 urchins transplanted from Port Everglades and Government Cut remained at the Key Biscayne reefs.

“We’ve shown that they will stay for us, which is promising,” Lirman said.

However, the eventual goal is not to just move the urchins around but grow them in tanks and release them wherever they’re needed. At this point, Lirman said, scientists are just trying to use Diadema to help the struggling reefs. They’re not attempting to resurrect the species.

“The goal is not to get them to spawn, the goal is to get them to stay and clean the reef so our coral restoration can be successful,” he said. “At some point it would be nice to dump millions of competent larvae — that’s a pipe dream right now.”

https://www.rawstory.com/sea-urchin-die-off-threatens-reefs-from-florida-to-caribbean-scientists-hope-to-revive-them/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #406 on: April 10, 2023, 08:06:35 AM »
9 wins, 9 romps. Baseball has never seen a team start like these Rays

With a second straight 11-0 win, the Rays have completed the best nine-game stretch to start an MLB season.



ST. PETERSBURG — Remember this. Remember this now while the joy is fresh, and the memories are clear. Remember this before injuries, better competition and the reality of baseball ruin the vibe.

You have never seen anything like what the Rays have done in the first nine games of the season. I know this is true because Major League Baseball has never seen anything like what the Rays have done.

It’s not just that Tampa Bay is the first team in 20 years to open a season with nine consecutive wins. It’s the way the Rays have won. Emphatically. Uproariously. Entertainingly.

Each of the 12 previous teams to start a season 9-0 had close calls along the way. Six of them had extra-inning games. Eleven of them had a one-run game. None of them was even close to an average margin of victory of 6.3 runs per game.

“Unbelievable,” starting pitcher Drew Rasmussen said.

The Rays have hit 24 home runs and scored 75 runs. None of those other teams came close to matching that. The Rays have allowed 18 runs to score. Only two of those other teams managed to do better. It’s not any one thing. It’s everything.

“It’s insane,” reliever Jason Adam said.

Even if you dismiss the oddity of Tampa Bay doing this during the first two weeks of the regular season, it is still an unnatural number of beatdowns in a row. It’s been 84 years since a team won nine consecutive games by four or more runs at any point in a season.

“Everything is clicking,” manager Kevin Cash said.



Look, everyone in the clubhouse knows this is not sustainable. Everyone knows the schedule makers deserve an assist for offering nine consecutive games against Detroit, Washington and Oakland. But everyone in there also knows there is a unique blend of skill and depth on this Rays roster.

“When you’re rolling as a team, you just keep it going. You don’t question anything,” said second baseman Brandon Lowe, who has four walks, three hits, six runs and eight RBIs in his last nine plate appearances.

“You just show up and take care of business. It really just feels like we’re playing our game. This is exactly what we figured was going to happen when we got everybody back healthy.”

You figured this would happen?

“We knew we were gonna be good,” he said.

Yes, the Rays are good. They may even be great, although we are a long, long way from determining that.

The point is there are exceptional teams in every sport in every season, but the Rays are also inordinately entertaining. They can, of course, hit and pitch. But they also play great defense. And they are fearless on the bases. But they are also young and vibrant and appreciative of their opportunities.

By now, you may have seen or heard of the hustle of Harold Ramirez in Sunday’s 11-0 victory against Oakland. On a routine ground ball in the fourth inning, Ramirez busted it down the first-base line for a single when A’s third baseman Jace Peterson took an extra beat to glance at the runner going to second.

Two outs later, Christian Bethancourt hit a grounder to short that looked like an inning-ending forceout. Except first base coach Chris Prieto had told Ramirez to get an extra-long lead because Oakland wasn’t holding him on, and the husky Ramirez again hustled into a base ahead of the throw.

Moments later, Lowe hit a grand slam. That was four extra runs because Ramirez refused to give up.

“We all play for each other, and I think that’s what makes this team so good,” said first baseman Luke Raley. “We blew that game open with B-Lowe’s grand slam, but that never happens without Harold’s hustle. That’s how we’re going to play. We have a bunch of guys willing to work hard for the guy behind them. So I wouldn’t say we’re shocked. Our (pitching) staff is good, our bats are going, we’ve got a good team.”

But isn’t it crazy to outscore three different opponents by a combined 75-18?

“Yeah, it’s crazy. So let’s stay that way,” Raley said.

For the record, the Rays have a combined slugging percentage of .588 and an on-base percentage of .374. The starting rotation has an ERA of 1.90 with 60 strikeouts in 52 innings.

The only area of the team that hasn’t been seriously tested is the bullpen. That’s the way it goes when you’ve been tied or had the lead in 93.9 percent of the innings you’ve played. The Rays are the only unbeaten team in the majors but, incongruously, they’re the only team without a save.

So who is going to get the first save opportunity for Tampa Bay in 2023?

“I guess it will be Pete (Fairbanks),” said Adam. “But it’s like he’s been on vacation.”

https://www.tampabay.com/sports/rays/2023/04/09/unbeaten-rays-win-streak-mlb-best-brandon-lowe/

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #406 on: April 10, 2023, 08:06:35 AM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #407 on: April 11, 2023, 08:20:00 AM »
Louisville bank employee livestreamed attack that killed 5

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Louisville bank employee armed with a rifle opened fire at his workplace Monday morning, killing five people — including a close friend of Kentucky’s governor — while livestreaming the attack on Instagram, authorities said.

Police arrived as shots were still being fired inside Old National Bank and killed the shooter in an exchange of gunfire, Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Jacquelyn Gwinn-Villaroel said. The city’s mayor, Craig Greenberg, called the attack “an evil act of targeted violence.”

The shooting, the 15th mass killing in the country this year, comes just two weeks after a former student killed three children and three adults at a Christian elementary school in Nashville, Tennessee, about 160 miles (260 kilometers) to the south. That state’s governor and his wife also had friends killed in that shooting.

In Louisville, the chief identified the shooter as 25-year-old Connor Sturgeon, who she said was livestreaming during the attack.

“That’s tragic to know that that incident was out there and captured,” she said.

Meta, the company that owns Facebook and Instagram, said in a statement that it had “quickly removed the livestream of this tragic incident this morning.”

Social media companies have imposed tougher rules over the past few years to prohibit violent and extremist content. They have set up systems to remove posts and streams that violate those restrictions, but shocking material like the Louisville shooting continues to slip through the cracks, prompting lawmakers and other critics to lash out at the technology industry for slipshod safeguards and moderation policies.

A man who fled the building during the shooting told WHAS-TV that the shooter opened fire with a long rifle in a conference room in the back of the building’s first floor.

“Whoever was next to me got shot — blood is on me from it,” he told the news station, pointing to his shirt. He said he fled to a break room and shut the door.

Nine people, including two police officers, were treated for injuries, University of Louisville Hospital spokeswoman Heather Fountaine said in an email. One of the wounded, identified as 57-year-old Deana Eckert, later died, police said Monday night.

One of the wounded officers, 26-year-old Nickolas Wilt, graduated from the police academy on March 31. He was in critical condition after being shot in the head and having surgery, the police chief said. At least three patients had been discharged.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said he lost one of his closest friends in the shooting.

“Tommy Elliott helped me build my law career, helped me become governor, gave me advice on being a good dad,” said Beshear, his voice shaking with emotion. “He’s one of the people I talked to most in the world, and very rarely were we talking about my job. He was an incredible friend.”

Also killed in the shooting were Josh Barrick, Jim Tutt and Juliana Farmer, police said.

“These are irreplaceable, amazing individuals that a terrible act of violence tore from all of us,” the governor said.

Beshear spoke as the investigation in Louisville continued and police searched for a motive. Crime scene investigators could be seen marking and photographing numerous bullet holes in the windows near the front door of the bank, not far from Waterfront Park and minor league ballpark Louisville Slugger Field.

As part of the investigation, police descended on the neighborhood where the suspect lived, about 5 miles (8 kilometers) south of the downtown shooting. The street was blocked as federal and local officers talked to residents. One home was cordoned off with caution tape. Kami Cooper, who lives in the neighborhood, said she didn’t recall ever meeting the suspect but said it’s an unnerving feeling to have lived on the same street as someone who could do such a thing.

“I’m almost speechless. You see it on the news but not at home,” Cooper said. “It’s unbelievable, it could happen here, somebody on my street.”

Deputy Police Chief Paul Humphrey said the actions of responding police officers undoubtedly saved lives.

“This is a tragic event,” he said. “But it was the heroic response of officers that made sure that no more people were more seriously injured than what happened.”

Just a few hours later and blocks away, an unrelated shooting killed one man and wounded a woman outside a community college, police said.

The 15 mass shootings this year are the most during the first 100 days of a calendar year since 2009, when 16 had occurred by April 10, according to a mass killings database maintained by The Associated Press and USA Today in partnership with Northeastern University. The pace slowed later in 2009, with 32 mass killings recorded that year.

Going back to 2006, the first year for which data has been compiled, the years with the most mass killings were 2019 and 2022, with 45 and 42 mass killings recorded during the entire calendar year.

It was the second time that Beshear was personally touched by a mass tragedy since becoming governor.

In late 2021, one of the towns devastated by tornadoes that tore through Kentucky was Dawson Springs, the hometown of Beshear’s father, former two-term Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear. Andy Beshear frequently visited Dawson Springs as a boy and has talked emotionally about his father’s hometown.

https://apnews.com/article/downtown-louisville-shooting-dc7b45a9c5d2b384a16d653864f8b735