Media Today

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Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #320 on: August 15, 2022, 10:08:42 PM »
Opinion: Trump is worried after FBI search -- and he should be

A week of stunning developments for the possible criminal liability of former President Donald Trump and his circle was capped off with this weekend's news that a Trump lawyer had signed a statement this summer saying that all material marked as classified in the former President's possession had been returned. Together with earlier revelations, this latest piece of the puzzle points us to the direction in which the Department of Justice is headed -- and when.

First, with the search warrant at Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence now public, it shows the possibility of alleged crimes that are significant. The warrant is based upon probable cause to believe, first, that taking large quantities of materials to Mar-a-Lago violated the core federal criminal document preservation statute related to presidential records. It forbids the willful concealment, removal, or destruction of documents -- classified or not -- belonging to the government of the United States. The maximum penalty is three years' imprisonment.

More serious still is the possible violation of the federal Espionage Act, also listed on the warrant. Its violation carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison. Individuals are subject to conviction under the act if they willfully retain and fail to deliver information "relating to the national defense" upon the demand of a federal officer entitled to receive such information that has come into the individuals' possession.

This statute comes into play because the FBI retrieved 11 sets of classified documents from Mar-a-Lago last Monday. Information is marked "secret" if its unauthorized release would cause "serious damage to national security." Information that would cause "exceptionally grave damage to national security" is marked "top secret." If information is marked "TS/SCI," it is even more highly protected -- "top secret/sensitive compartmented information," meaning that it comes from sensitive sources or methods.

In short, while all the material recovered could be considered stolen government property, the classified documents that the FBI retrieved and that were marked "top secret" and "various classified/TS/SCI" are of special concern. Although the Espionage Act does not require that "information related to the national defense" be classified, these highly sensitive documents would likely fall under the definition of "information relating to the national defense" under the Espionage Act.

Finally, there is the offense of obstructing a pending federal investigation by concealing documents relating to that investigation. It carries the heaviest potential penalty: up to 20 years in prison. As grave as violations of the first two statutes are, interfering with a Justice Department investigation is especially serious.

Trump has denied all wrongdoing and claims the investigation is politically motivated.

Reporting has already detailed the concerning pattern of document turnover. It started with negotiations and voluntary requests from national archivists in 2021, resulting in the return of 15 boxes of materials in 2022. That was followed in the spring by a grand jury subpoena evidently compelling production of documents. Then investigators visited in June, taking still more documents with them and at some later point securing the recently reported, evidently false statement that all material marked as classified had been returned.

Neither that subpoena nor the lawyer's June delivery produced the 11 sets of classified information that the FBI said it took from Mar-a-Lago last week.

The warrant's release explains what Attorney General Merrick Garland was talking about on Thursday when he spoke of the "standard practice to seek less intrusive means" than a search warrant whenever possible. He was telling us that the Justice Department tried everything else (and then some) first.

Note that if Trump or others did not honestly comply with the subpoena, that's a separate possible crime. That might be why the department reportedly subpoenaed the surveillance footage of people going in and out of the document rooms.

Government officials were also understandably concerned about who had access to classified documents.

Further, if Trump and those around him, including his lawyers, made intentionally inaccurate statements to the government, they may be criminally liable for making false statements.

While this new report on a lawyer's letter casts added light on the situation, gaps necessarily remain. As is standard operating procedure, the Justice Department has not released the FBI agent's sworn affidavit supporting the search warrant. Such affidavits, and the evidence they contain, are closely held until soon after the DOJ files any criminal charges.

Disclosing affidavits prematurely can give away the government's case and inform targets what investigatory routes they need to block, what evidence to destroy and what potential witnesses' cooperation they need to forestall. That is why Garland should hold firm despite demands from some of the former President's allies in Congress to see the affidavit.

The ordinary reasons apply with even greater force in a case involving exceptionally sensitive national security data and a highly confidential informant. In our current, hyper-charged political environment, when an armed follower of Trump's social media site enters a Cincinnati FBI office with an apparent intent to kill, any public information on a reported Mar-a-Lago informant could easily put that person's life in danger.

Still, Garland has adeptly brought the picture into focus with his properly terse statement and release of the warrant -- while complying with the DOJ's stringent rules on what can and cannot be said. We shouldn't take the attorney general's integrity and prosecutorial experience for granted. After all, we just had Bill Barr, whose distortions as attorney general of the Mueller report may have emboldened Trump's belief in complete personal impunity from legal consequences. In the Nixon era, we had enabling Attorney Generals John Mitchell and Richard Kleindienst, both of whom were convicted of crimes

Given Garland's care to follow the rules, we are going to have to be satisfied with his disclosures for a while. We are now in the window Garland laid out in his recent memo about the DOJ avoiding any actions that could be perceived as affecting an election before it takes place. (Although the window is often referred to as a three-month one, the memo is silent as to the actual number of days.)

Trump remains one of the most polarizing characters in American politics, and any action taken could have an impact on the midterm elections. That is so even though Trump has not declared his candidacy for 2024 and is not on any ballot.

The accumulation of allegations adds to the chances that Trump might be charged. It's not just the possible removal of documents, or even the more serious national security ones. It's that documents appear to have been withheld again and again.

Moreover, Garland's moves last week were not necessarily just about potential document crimes. As an earlier overview explained, the DOJ can use anything found pursuant to the search warrant to prove other possible crimes.

There are three fronts on which federal criminal investigations are likely to proceed, quietly before November but perhaps more loudly afterward: alleged document crimes, conspiracy to defraud the United States by seeking to overturn the 2020 election before January 6, 2021, and obstruction of Congress on January 6.

On Sunday, Trump may have dropped a hint that the FBI seized information related to the latter two. He complained on his site, Truth Social, that the FBI "took boxes of 'attorney-client' material, and also 'executive' privilege material which they knowingly should not have taken." We know that attorney-client and executive privilege arguments have loomed large in the January 6 investigations. Time will tell whether the FBI also swept up information relating to additional matters separate from the removal of classified documents.

Trump's groundless caterwauling this past week proves he's concerned about possible prosecution. He should be. There are just too many ongoing investigations to think that he can dodge them all.

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/15/opinions/search-warrant-trumps-mar-a-lago-trump-criminal-liability/index.html

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #320 on: August 15, 2022, 10:08:42 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #321 on: August 16, 2022, 06:05:01 AM »
Lamont Dozier, Motown songwriter, dies aged 81: The Motown master craftsman who created miracles under pressure

As one third of a legendary songwriting and production partnership, Dozier produced a slew of indelible hits that expressed the joy and frustration of a whole generation


'Love is love’ … left to right, Diana Ross, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland, on the occasion of the songwriters’ induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Photograph: Robin Platzer/The Life Images Collection

Lamont Dozier was not a man much given to discussing the mystical art of songwriting and inspiration. You might have thought he would be. There’s certainly something extraordinary about the sheer quality of the songs he wrote with Brian and Eddie Holland in the 60s and early 70s: Baby Love, Nowhere to Run, Stop! In the Name of Love, Reach Out I’ll Be There, Heatwave, I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch), Band of Gold, You Can’t Hurry Love, You Keep Me Hangin On and Bernadette among them – a catalogue that meant Holland-Dozier-Holland stood out even amid the riches of songwriting and production talent assembled at Motown. There’s a fair argument for calling this collection of songs the greatest in the history of pop.

And it wasn’t just that these songs were hits – they were the kind of hits that became indelibly imprinted on the brain of anyone with even a passing interest in pop music. But Dozier took a very prosaic attitude to it all, presenting himself not as the genius he clearly was but as a man who’d simply worked hard, “banging on that piano”. “There’s no such thing as writer’s block,” he contended a few years before his death. “That’s just being lazy. That’s just something you put in your own head. ‘I don’t feel it today’ – that’s bull***t.”

Perhaps that was just the attitude one developed in the hothouse hit factory environment of Motown where, Dozier recalled, songwriting sessions could last for 18 hours straight and founder Berry Gordy was given to announcing “so-and-so needs a hit because they’re going out of town and they need something right away”. The more successful the label got, the more Gordy seemed to pile on the pressure: in 1965, at the height of Motown’s golden age, he issued an edict: “We will release nothing less than Top 10 product on any artist. Because the Supremes’ worldwide acceptance is greater than the other artists, on them we will release only No 1 records.”

It was a challenging environment to which Dozier and the Holland brothers responded in the most incredible fashion. Each of them had started out as a performer in Detroit before being brought together by Gordy. Dozier thought they worked so well together because of their shared background in the church and a mutual love of classical music. They were, by all accounts, as determined and tough as their boss, and not above provoking the artists they worked with in order to get the best out of them. Diana Ross fled the sessions for Where Did Our Love Go in tears: she hated the song, which Dozier just maintained gave her vocal “the attitude it needed to become a big hit”. Their relationship with Marvin Gaye was also frequently volatile, the singer feeling provoked by the trio deliberately writing songs in a key he felt was too high for him, in order, Dozier said, “to be a little more imaginative, reach up to a falsetto”.

However much trouble their methods caused around Hitsville USA, you couldn’t argue with the end result. Holland-Dozier-Holland were skilled at drawing out performances of startling intensity from artists. Listen to Levi Stubbs’ voice on the Four Tops’ Standing in the Shadows of Love. Or his cry of “Just look over your shoulder!” on Reach Out (I’ll Be There). Or the 1971 single You Keep Running Away, where the singer’s agonies – “Just look at me, I’m not the man I used to be / I used to be proud, I used to be strong” – chafe against the ebullience of the musical backing. Meanwhile, the Supremes may have been painted as Motown’s poppiest and sweetest group, but there’s a genuine desperation about Ross’s lead vocal on You Keep Me Hangin’ On that is startlingly powerful when combined with the music’s churning relentlessness, the pounding drums, the one-note morse-code guitar.

Holland-Dozier-Holland’s songs occasionally contained a darker undercurrent than was immediately apparent. Martha and the Vandellas’ wonderful 1967 single Jimmy Mack was inspired when Dozier attended a songwriting ceremony in New York where the mother of the songwriter Ronnie Mack – who had died aged 23 from cancer – accepted an award on his behalf for the Chiffons’ He’s So Fine. It takes on a noticeably different hue if you consider that the subject of the Martha Reeves’ pleas to return might be dead.

Although never overtly political, Motown’s golden age played out against a backdrop of turmoil in America, much of it connected to the civil rights movement. And without ever making it explicit enough to harm their commercial chances, Holland-Dozier-Holland frequently seemed to be sending out coded messages to their black American audience. As the writer Jon Savage subsequently noted, the tense, Bob Dylan-influenced Reach Out (I’ll Be There) “offered advice and sustenance to communities … under extreme duress”. Martha and the Vandellas’ Nowhere to Run, meanwhile, presents itself as a love song but in reality was inspired by the state of America. Dozier later said its claustrophobic atmosphere had more to do with seeing tanks on the streets in the wake of riots and teenagers being shipped off to Vietnam than with romance.

Immediate, accessible pop music that is emotionally impactful and rich with meaning: it was an incredible trick to pull off, but Holland-Dozier-Holland did it again and again. It wasn’t enough to save their relationship with Motown. Promised and then denied their own sub-label, and angry about the way money was distributed in the company, they first went on a go-slow, then left entirely in 1968. The ensuing litigation went on for years, and forced them to use a pseudonym – Edythe Wayne – when writing for artists on their own labels, Invicta and Hot Wax.

They had more hits – Freda Payne’s Band of Gold; Give Me Just a Little More Time by the Chairmen of the Board – maintaining the same breathtaking standard that they’d kept at Motown. But Dozier became disillusioned: he claimed the Holland brothers passed on the chance to sign both Funkadelic and Al Green, and their rejection of the latter pre-empted his decision to leave, and another lawsuit. He pursued a successful solo career as a performer: 1973’s gorgeous Take Off Your Make Up and the following year’s Trying to Hold Onto My Woman suggested songwriting powers undiminished by the break-up of the partnership, and the Afrocentric 1977 album track Going Back to My Roots enjoyed a long afterlife thanks to multiple cover versions. Somehow his friendships with both Berry Gordy and the Holland brothers survived the legal disputes: “Business is business,” he shrugged, “but love is love.”

He moved to London in the 80s and kept writing: he was behind Alison Moyet’s 1984 hit Invisible, and collaborated with Mick Hucknall, who one suspects couldn’t believe his luck, on a string of tracks for Simply Red. Sometimes he dealt in material that nodded to the classic 60s Motown sound, such as the Four Tops’ Loco in Acapulco or Phil Collins’ Two Hearts. None of it was ever likely to supplant Holland-Dozier-Holland’s 60s output in anyone’s affections, but clearly his hitmaking touch was intact.

In his later years, he dabbled in musical theatre, taught courses at the University of Southern California and seemed happy to give interviews in which he reflected on Holland-Dozier-Holland’s peerless achievements; the pressure they’d worked under at Motown; the havoc it had wreaked on their personal lives; the way they’d come up with this song or that song. Ultimately, however, every interview seemed to come back to the same unassuming theme. “It was blood, sweat and tears,” he told the Guardian in 2015. “We just worked and worked … until we came up with things.”

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2022/aug/09/lamont-dozier-foreman-motown-hit-factory


Lamont Dozier, Motown songwriter, dies aged 81

Lamont Dozier, the Motown legend behind hits for artists such as the Supremes, the Four Tops and the Isley Brothers, has died aged 81.

The news was confirmed by his son Lamont Dozier Jr on Instagram. No cause of death has been released as yet.

As one third of production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, Dozier was responsible for 10 of the Supremes’ 12 US No 1 singles, including Baby Love and You Keep Me Hanging On.

The trio was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

Ronnie Wood, who covered the trio’s 1963 single Leaving Home in 2001, paid tribute to Dozier on Twitter. “God bless Lamont,” he wrote. “His music will live on.” Mick Hucknall, who worked with Dozier in the 1980s, also tweeted his condolences calling him “One of the greatest songwriters of all time.”

Born in Detroit, Michigan on 16 June, 1941, Dozier started his musical career working for a few Detroit labels with little success. His luck changed in 1962 when he and songwriting brothers Brian and Eddie Holland started work at Motown. They hit the ground running, scoring three hits – Come and Get These Memories, Heatwave, and Quicksand – for Martha and The Vandellas.

They were followed in 1964 by Where Did Our Love Go, the first of 10 US chart-toppers the trio would write for The Supremes. Four years later, having helped define the Motown sound, Holland–Dozier–Holland left the label to start the Invictus and Hot Wax labels. Dozier would go on to record as a soloist for both labels.

After leaving Holland–Dozier–Holland in 1973, Dozier focused on his solo career, with one of his early singles, Going Back To My Roots, later becoming a huge success for disco group Odyssey in 1981.

Seven years later Dozier collaborated with Phil Collins on the US No 1 Two Hearts, winning the pair a Golden Globe and a Grammy. Dozier also worked with other British artists during the 80s, including Alison Moyet and Simply Red.

Dozier is survived by his six children.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2022/aug/09/lamont-dozier-motown-songwriter-dies-age-81

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #321 on: August 16, 2022, 06:05:01 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #322 on: August 16, 2022, 04:10:09 PM »
Biden administration cancels $3.9 billion in student debt for 208,000 borrowers defrauded by ITT Tech

The U.S. Department of Education announced on Tuesday that it will cancel all remaining federal student debt taken on by borrowers who were defrauded by ITT Technical Institute since 2005, delivering $3.9 billion in relief to some 208,000 people.

ITT Educational Services was at one point one of the largest operators of for-profit technical schools in the U.S., and shut down in 2016. Borrowers shouldn’t have to apply for the relief, the Education Department said.

“The evidence shows that for years, ITT’s leaders intentionally misled students about the quality of their programs in order to profit off federal student loan programs, with no regard for the hardship this would cause,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, in a statement.

“The Biden-Harris Administration will continue to stand up for borrowers who’ve been cheated by their colleges, while working to strengthen oversight and enforcement to protect today’s students from similar deception and abuse,” Cardona added.

To date, the Biden-Harris Administration has approved the cancellation of nearly $32 billion in student loans for 1.6 million borrowers.

“President Biden continues to use existing statutory authority to forgive more student loan debt than any previous president,” said higher education expert Mark Kantrowitz.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/16/education-dept-cancels-3point9-billion-in-student-loans-for-itt-tech.html

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #322 on: August 16, 2022, 04:10:09 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #323 on: August 16, 2022, 04:34:09 PM »
Michigan gas prices fall below $4 for first time since April
https://money.yahoo.com/michigan-gas-prices-fall-below-140428721.html

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #323 on: August 16, 2022, 04:34:09 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #324 on: August 16, 2022, 04:57:01 PM »
Dow rises for fifth day, jumping 200 points after strong Walmart and Home Depot results

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rallied on Tuesday, rising for a fifth day as Wall Street assessed strong earnings results from Walmart and Home Depot.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average outperformed, rising 191 points, or 0.56%. The S&P 500 traded 0.1% higher and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 0.33%.

Walmart reported earnings per share that beat analyst expectations and stuck with its second-half outlook, which sent the stock up more than 5%. Home Depot shares jumped 4% after reporting results that beat expectations and maintaining its 2022 guidance.

Amid the news, retail names including Target, Best Buy and Bath & Body Works moved more than 4% higher. Retail earnings continue with reports from Target and Lowe’s on Wednesday.

“You’re seeing kind of that push-pull of reduced inflation, which is good for the market, and then slowing economic growth, which is bad for the market,” said Chris Zaccarelli, chief investment officer at the Independent Advisor Alliance. “I think the market is really trying to grapple [with] the information that’s coming in.”

Wall Street is coming off a solid session, with the major averages all rising Monday after a sharp intraday turnaround and building on the market’s rally off a June low.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/15/stock-market-news-futures-open-to-close.html

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #324 on: August 16, 2022, 04:57:01 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #325 on: August 16, 2022, 09:15:15 PM »
WATCH | President Biden signs Inflation Reduction Act

AP) President Joe Biden will sign Democrats’ landmark climate change and health care bill on Tuesday, delivering what he has called the “final piece” of his pared-down domestic agenda, as he aims to boost his party’s standing with voters less than three months before the midterm elections.

The legislation includes the most substantial federal investment in history to fight climate change — some $375 billion over the decade — and would cap prescription drug costs at $2,000 out-of-pocket annually for Medicare recipients. It also would help an estimated 13 million Americans pay for health care insurance by extending subsidies provided during the coronavirus pandemic.

The measure is paid for by new taxes on large companies and stepped-up IRS enforcement of wealthy individuals and entities, with additional funds going to reduce the federal deficit.

The House on Friday approved the measure on a party-line 220-207 vote. It passed the Senate days earlier with Vice President Kamala Harris breaking a 50-50 tie in that chamber.

Watch:


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Re: Media Today
« Reply #325 on: August 16, 2022, 09:15:15 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #326 on: August 17, 2022, 04:31:07 AM »
All systems go in Houston as NASA prepares return to Moon



Rick LaBrode has worked at NASA for 37 years, but he says the American quest to return to the Moon is by far the crowning moment of his career.

LaBrode is the lead flight director for Artemis 1, set to take off later this month -- the first time a capsule that can carry humans will be sent to the Moon since the last Apollo mission in 1972.

"This is more exciting than really anything I've ever been a part of," LaBrode told journalists at the US space agency's Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas.

The 60-year-old confided to AFP that the eve of the launch is likely to be a long night of anticipation -- and little rest.

"I'm going to be so excited. I won't be able to sleep too much, I'm sure of that," he said, in front of Mission Control's iconic giant bank of screens.

Artemis 1, an uncrewed test flight, will feature the first blastoff of the massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, which will be the most powerful in the world when it goes into operation.

It will propel the Orion crew capsule into orbit around the Moon. The spacecraft will remain in space for 42 days before returning to Earth.

From 2024, astronauts will travel aboard Orion for the same trip, and the following year, at the earliest, Americans will once again step foot on the Moon.

For the duration of Artemis 1, a team of about a dozen NASA personnel will remain in Mission Control 24 hours a day. The center has been renovated and updated for the occasion.

Teams have been rehearsing for this moment for three years.

"This is a whole new deal -- a whole new rocket, a whole new spacecraft, a whole new control center," explained Brian Perry, the flight dynamics officer, who will be in charge of Orion's trajectory immediately following the launch.

"I can tell you, my heart is going to be tum tum, tum tum. But I'll work hard to keep focused," Perry, who worked on numerous space shuttle flights over the years, told AFP, tapping his chest.

Moon pool

Beyond upgrades to Mission Control for the mission, the entire Johnson Space Center is a bit over the Moon about Artemis.

Beyond upgrades to Mission Control for the mission, the entire Johnson Space Center is a bit over the Moon about Artemis.

In the middle of the giant astronaut training tank -- the world's largest indoor swimming pool at more than 200 feet long, 100 feet wide and 40 feet deep -- a black curtain has been erected.

On one side of the so-called Neutral Buoyancy Lab is a mockup of the International Space Station, submerged.

On the other, the lunar environment is gradually being recreated at the bottom of the pool, with giant model rocks made by a company specializing in aquarium decorations.

"It's only been in the last few months that we started to put the sand on the bottom of the pool. We just got that large rock in two weeks ago," said the lab's deputy chief Lisa Shore. "It's all very new for us and very much in development."

In the water, astronauts can experience a sensation that approaches weightlessness. To train for eventual voyages to the Moon, simulations must replicate the Moon's one-sixth gravity.

From a room above the pool, the astronauts are guided remotely -- with the four-second communications delay they will experience on the lunar surface.

Six have already done training and six more will do so by the end of September. The latter group will wear the new spacesuits made by NASA for Artemis missions.

"The heyday of this facility was when we were still flying the space shuttle and we were assembling the space station," explained the lab's office chief John Haas.

At that time, 400 training sessions with astronauts in full spacesuits took place every year, as compared with about 150 today. But the Artemis program has infused the lab with new urgency.

When AFP visited the facility, engineers and divers were testing how to pull a cart on the Moon.

'New golden age'

Each session in the pool can last up to six hours.

"It's like running a marathon twice, but on your hands," astronaut Victor Glover told AFP.

Glover returned to Earth last year after spending six months on the International Space Station. Now, he works in a building dedicated to simulators of all varieties.

He said his job is to help "verify procedures and hardware" so that when NASA finally names the Artemis astronauts who will take part in crewed missions to the Moon (Glover could be on that list himself), they can be "ready to go."

Using virtual reality headsets, the astronauts can get used to walking in dark conditions at the Moon's South Pole, where the missions will land.

The Sun barely rises above the horizon there, meaning there are always long, dark shadows that impair visibility.

The astronauts must also get used to the new spacecraft like the Orion capsule, and the equipment on board.

In one of the simulators, seated in the commander's chair, personnel are trained to dock with the future lunar space station Gateway.

Elsewhere at the space center, a replica of the Orion capsule, which measures a mere 316 cubic feet (nine cubic meters) for four people, is in use.

"They do a lot of emergency egress training here," Debbie Korth, deputy manager of the Orion program, told AFP.

Korth, who has worked on Orion for more than a decade, said everyone in Houston is excited for the return to the Moon and for NASA's future.

"Definitely, I feel like it is like a new golden age," she said.

© 2022 AFP

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #326 on: August 17, 2022, 04:31:07 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #327 on: August 17, 2022, 09:37:58 PM »
Secret Service knew Trump supporters were targeting Pelosi but failed to pass that along until hours after riot began: emails

Citizens for Ethics @CREWcrew

BREAKING: The Secret Service knew of a threat to Nancy Pelosi on January 6th days before the insurrection, but did not pass it along until hours after the Capitol had been breached

https://twitter.com/CREWcrew/status/1559923825369923584


Secret Service held onto Pelosi threat until after insurrection
https://www.citizensforethics.org/reports-investigations/crew-investigations/secret-service-held-onto-pelosi-threat-until-after-insurrection/

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #327 on: August 17, 2022, 09:37:58 PM »

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #328 on: August 18, 2022, 05:50:21 AM »
Hurricane center keeps its eyes on tropical wave in the Caribbean



A tropical wave near Central America is moving north and could become the fourth named storm of the year.

The wave is near Nicaragua and eastern Honduras and is forecast to move across Central America and emerge over the Bay of Campeche, where it could emerge Friday as an area of low pressure. However, it could be met with trouble as dry dust from the Saharan Air Layer is forecast to appear in the same location Friday, according to the National Weather Service tracker. The SAL is a migration of African dust, which pushes west and into the Caribbean, drying out atmospheric conditions of the Atlantic basin and making it too dry for hurricanes to form.

The NHC gives the system a 20% chance of formation in the next five days. If it does develop, it would be the fourth named system of the year and take on the name Danielle.

Despite multiple forecasts of above-average storm production, the season has been off to a slow start given the historic record of Atlantic storms, which typically sees four named storms by Aug. 15, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Earlier this month, the NOAA reaffirmed its preseason prediction of an above-average hurricane season with a range of 14 to 21 named storms. The NOAA expects most storms to emerge during the season’s peak, occurring between mid-August and mid-October.

So far, the 2022 season has seen three named storms: Alex, Bonnie and Colin — the latter of which fizzled at the beginning of July. After a month of tropical silence, the NHC has been jumping around the last 10 days, tracking short-lived systems with the potential to form into depressions or tropical storms.

Over the weekend, the NHC was tracking a broad trough of low pressure in the mid-Atlantic, but its chances of formation dropped to 0% by Monday morning. Before that, the NHC had eyes on a system in the Gulf of Mexico, but it failed to form into more than a spate of showers and thunderstorms that drenched southeastern Texas. And before that, a system off the African coast was demanding attention before environmental factors snuffed its chances.

Hurricane season ends on Nov. 30.

Orlando Sentinel

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #328 on: August 18, 2022, 05:50:21 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #329 on: August 19, 2022, 04:25:30 AM »
43 Republicans voted against capping insulin at $35 for people who have diabetes. They want people to go bankrupt paying for their life saving medication. Absolutely disgraceful. 

Earlier this year 193 House Republicans voted against lowering the cost of insulin for people who have diabetes.

Republicans are not on your side. They side with the special interests groups and Big Pharma who make people pay through the nose for their life saving insulin. Why else would they vote "NO" to help people survive without going bankrupt?

Here is the official House vote on lowering the cost of insulin. 193 Republicans voted "NO" to lower the cost of insulin.

Democrats lowered the cost of insulin for seniors with the Inflation Reduction Act. Every single Republican in the House and the Senate voted against the Inflation Reduction Act.   





The Inflation Reduction Act caps costs for Medicare patients on insulin. Where the push for broader relief stands

- The Inflation Reduction Act caps monthly insulin costs for Medicare beneficiaries.

- The change will be meaningful for senior patients who struggle with the cost of treatment

- “We’re glad for the victory we have, but there’s more work to be done,” said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer at the American Diabetes Association.




A new legislative package signed into law by President Joe Biden on Tuesday is a big win for Medicare patients who struggle to cover the cost of insulin to manage their diabetes.

But the bill, called the Inflation Reduction Act, falls short of applying those cost controls to the broader patient population who rely on insulin.

The bill limits insulin copays to $35 per month for Medicare Part D beneficiaries starting in 2023. Notably, seniors covered by Medicare also have a $2,000 annual out-of-pocket cap on Part D prescription drugs starting in 2025. Medicare will also now have the ability to negotiate the costs of certain prescription drugs.

“We’re very excited that seniors are going to see these cost savings,” said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer at the American Diabetes Association.

But the changes fall short of the broader applicability to diabetes patients who are covered by private insurance.

“We’re glad for the victory we have, but there’s more work to be done,” Gabbay said.


Why insulin relief was limited to Medicare patients

Democrats pursued the Inflation Reduction Act through a process called budget reconciliation, or a simple party majority.

In that process, the Senate Parliamentarian ruled broader insulin reform for non-Medicare patients could not be included in the legislation. Senate lawmakers then sought 60 votes in order to keep it in the bill. But they fell short with just 57 votes, as 43 lawmakers opposed it.

The result was a disappointment, Gabbay said. Legislation capping the cost of insulin, or the cost of care to people with diabetes, has already been passed in 23 states and Washington, D.C.

“We were hoping that now is the time to go national and really have a comprehensive law that would protect all people with diabetes in the U.S.,” Gabbay said.

The American Diabetes Association plans to continue to advocate for relief for more patients, including the INSULIN Act, which calls for capping monthly insulin costs for a broader patient population.

“We hope that that can come to Congress this fall,” Gabbay said.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., also expressed his intention to bring the proposal up for a vote again in the coming months.


What Medicare beneficiaries on insulin can expect

For patients age 65 and up who rely on insulin, the Inflation Reduction Act is a “game changer,” Gabbay said.

More than 8 million people in the U.S. rely on insulin to manage their blood glucose levels, and if they stop taking the medication for a few days, they could die. “It’s deadly serious,” Gabbay said.

Yet as the year progresses, some Medicare patients tend to get nervous about a coverage gap known as a “donut hole” and may try to ration their insulin, he said.

The high costs of insulin result in 14% of patients having “catastrophic” levels of spending on the treatment, according to recent research from Yale University. For Medicare patients on insulin, catastrophic spending affects one in five patients, the research found.

Starting in 2023, the Inflation Reduction Act will cap the cost of insulin for Medicare beneficiaries at $35 per month and will include those who use insulin pumps.

Medicare beneficiaries who pay more than $35 per month after the legislation is initially enacted will be reimbursed, according to the American Diabetes Association.

For patients struggling to cover insulin, the American Diabetes Association provides resources that may help curb those costs at Insulinhelp.org.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/16/inflation-reduction-act-to-cap-costs-for-medicare-patients-on-insulin.html

 

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