Media Today

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Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #300 on: August 07, 2022, 09:46:04 PM »
Megalodon sharks ruled the oceans millions of years ago – new analyses of giant fossilized teeth are helping scientists unravel the mystery of their extinction

https://theconversation.com/megalodon-sharks-ruled-the-oceans-millions-of-years-ago-new-analyses-of-giant-fossilized-teeth-are-helping-scientists-unravel-the-mystery-of-their-extinction-185118

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #300 on: August 07, 2022, 09:46:04 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #301 on: August 08, 2022, 02:21:10 AM »
Senate passes Democrats' sweeping health care and climate bill in win for Biden

The Senate on Sunday afternoon passed Democrats' $750 billion health care, tax and climate bill, in a significant victory for President Joe Biden and his party.

The final, party-line vote was 51-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris breaking the tie. The package is the product of painstaking negotiations, and its final passage would give Democrats a chance to achieve major policy objectives ahead of the upcoming midterm elections.

The Democrat-controlled House, which is expected to take up the legislation on Friday, August 12, must approve the bill before Biden can sign it into law.

The sweeping bill -- named the Inflation Reduction Act -- would represent the largest climate investment in US history and make major changes to health policy by giving Medicare the power for the first time to negotiate the prices of certain prescription drugs and extending expiring health care subsidies for three years. The legislation would reduce the deficit, be paid for through new taxes -- including a 15% minimum tax on large corporations and a 1% tax on stock buybacks -- and boost the Internal Revenue Service's ability to collect.

It would raise over $700 billion in government revenue over 10 years and spend over $430 billion to reduce carbon emissions and extend subsidies for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and use the rest of the new revenue to reduce the deficit.

Senate Democrats, with a narrow 50-seat majority, stayed unified to pass the legislation, using a special, filibuster-proof process to approve the measure without Republican votes. Final passage came after a marathon series of contentious amendment votes known as a "vote-a-rama" that stretched nearly 16 hours from late Saturday night until Sunday afternoon.

West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin said that the legislation he helped write is "a good balanced bill."

"I think we'll all benefit from it; the country will," Manchin said. "We have energy security, that's what we were looking for. And we have the ability to invest in the energy of the future."

Biden praised the Senate for passing the bill in a statement Sunday, thanking Democrats in the chamber and touting the legislation's climate investments and health care provisions.

"Today, Senate Democrats sided with American families over special interests, voting to lower the cost of prescription drugs, health insurance, and everyday energy costs and reduce the deficit, while making the wealthiest corporations finally pay their fair share," Biden said.

How the bill addresses the climate crisis

The nearly $370 billion clean energy and climate package is the largest climate investment in US history, and the biggest victory for the environmental movement since the landmark Clean Air Act. It also comes at a critical time; this summer has seen punishing heat waves and deadly floods across the country, which scientists say are both linked to a warming planet.

Analysis from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's office -- as well as multiple independent analyses -- suggests the measure would reduce US carbon emissions by up to 40% by 2030. Strong climate regulations from the Biden administration and action from states would be needed to get to President Joe Biden's goal of cutting emissions 50% by 2030.

The bill also contains many tax incentives meant to bring down the cost of electricity with more renewables, and spur more American consumers to switch to electricity to power their homes and vehicles.

Lawmakers said the bill represents a monumental victory and is also just the start of what's needed to combat the climate crisis.

"This isn't about the laws of politics, this is about the laws of physics," Democratic Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii  "We all knew coming into this effort that we had to do what the science tells us what we need to do."

Key health care and tax policy in the bill

The bill would empower Medicare to negotiate prices of certain costly medications administered in doctors' offices or purchased at the pharmacy. The Health and Human Services secretary would negotiate the prices of 10 drugs in 2026, and another 15 drugs in 2027 and again in 2028. The number would rise to 20 drugs a year for 2029 and beyond.

This provision is far more limited than the one House Democratic leaders have backed in the past. But it would open the door to fulfilling a longstanding party goal of allowing Medicare to use its heft to lower drug costs.

Democrats are also planning to extend the enhanced federal premium subsidies for Obamacare coverage through 2025, a year later than lawmakers recently discussed. That way, they wouldn't expire just after the 2024 presidential election.

To boost revenue, the bill would impose a 15% minimum tax on the income large corporations report to shareholders, known as book income, as opposed to the Internal Revenue Service. The measure, which would raise $258 billion over a decade, would apply to companies with profits over $1 billion.

The provision would have lengthened the amount of time investment managers' profit interest must be held from three years to five years to take advantage of the lower tax rate. Addressing this loophole, which would have raised $14 billion over a decade, had been a longtime goal of congressional Democrats.

In its place, a 1% excise tax on companies' stock buybacks was added, raising another $74 billion, according to a Democratic aide.

AFP

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #301 on: August 08, 2022, 02:21:10 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #302 on: August 08, 2022, 06:46:50 AM »
Vintage Scherzer, 'motivated' Mets sweep twin bill from Braves

NEW YORK -- Given how things tend to go around Willets Point, it was easy for some pockets of Mets fans to envision a worst-case scenario entering this weekend’s five-game series against the Braves. An Atlanta sweep would have pushed the Mets to second place for the first time since early April. More than that, it would have solidified the Braves as clear division favorites entering the stretch run of their NL East defense.

Such doomsday scenarios can be as much a part of Queens baseball culture as anything that happened in 1969 or ’86. But these Mets want no part of such cynicism. When the Braves trimmed New York’s NL East margin from 10 1/2 games on June 1 to just half a game on July 23, prompting Austin Riley to declare on Braves television that “we’re coming for them,” the Mets reeled off a seven-game winning streak to wrest back firm control of the division. When the Braves once again proved to be more active at the Trade Deadline, the Mets went out and beat them in a five-game series at Citi Field.

With a doubleheader sweep on Saturday, including an 8-5 win in the matinee and a 6-2 triumph in the nightcap, the Mets clinched that series victory over their closest division rival. What’s more, they looked like a team with no interest in being caught. Max Scherzer’s seven scoreless innings in Game 2 provided the latest vindication of the Mets’ decision to hand him a record-setting $130 million contract this past offseason.

“This is what you play the game for,” Scherzer said. “You play to face the best, especially deep in the season. You grind it out here in the NL East."

With Scherzer, the Mets have legitimized their contention. His 11-strikeout performance moved him into a tie with Justin Verlander for 14th place on the all-time list, while improving his record to 3-1 with a 1.37 ERA in seven starts since returning from the injured list. Pete Alonso collected three hits in the nightcap after Francisco Lindor did the same in the matinee, demonstrating how potent the Mets can be when their stars are clicking.

“We’re motivated, and we want to continue to play well,” Alonso said. “Our goal is to make the playoffs, win the division and have a chance to play for a World Series. Every single day is an opportunity to move one inch closer.”

New York has done it by being relentless. Consider:

- The Mets are 13-0-2 in series against NL East teams
- They are 30 games over .500 for the first time since the final day of the 2006 season
- They went 35-19 over the first third of the season and 34-20 in the second third[/i

For a time, the Mets did much of that without Scherzer, who missed nearly seven weeks due to an oblique strain. They’ve since relied on their ace not only to help them repel Atlanta’s charge up the standings, but also to reclaim a chunk of their lead. Following their doubleheader sweep, the Mets’ NL East edge bulged to 5 1/2 games.

Scherzer did need some help to submit a scoreless effort on Saturday, most notably after he allowed a leadoff double and an infield hit to put runners on the corners with one out in the fifth. The next batter, Ehire Adrianza, hit a sharp grounder to second base that Luis Guillorme fielded.

Typically, an infielder will gladly trade a run for an out with a three-run lead. But when Guillorme noticed Travis d’Arnaud hesitating off third base, Guillorme waited until d’Arnaud committed to the plate before firing an 85 mph strike home, where catcher Tomás Nido applied the tag to cut down a run.

"I don’t know if I’ve seen that,” manager Buck Showalter said. “That’s a baseball player play. You don’t work on that in St. Lucie.”

“It’s something that I, personally, probably have thought about before,” Guillorme said. “It may or may not happen. It just worked out today.”

That it worked out against the Braves was a boon for the Mets, who improved to 7-4 against the defending World Series champions. It’s a fine start to the head-to-head series, though the Mets are cognizant that that’s all it is -- a start. Even in early August, the Mets have eight games remaining against their rivals, which could still change the shape of the division race.

“It’s great to get these wins, but it’s not over yet,” Scherzer said. “We know how good they can play, and they can get hot, and we can continue to play great baseball as well. It’s great to win these games, don’t get me wrong. You want to beat them as much as you can. But it’s going to take that type of effort for the rest of the season.”

https://www.mlb.com/news/max-scherzer-strikes-out-11-as-mets-sweep-braves-in-dh

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #302 on: August 08, 2022, 06:46:50 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #303 on: August 08, 2022, 10:27:37 PM »
Olivia Newton-John, singer and actress, dead at 73

Olivia Newton-John, the Australian singer whose breathy voice and wholesome beauty made her one of the biggest pop stars of the '70s and charmed generations of viewers in the blockbuster movie "Grease," died on Monday, according to a statement from her husband. She was 73.

"Dame Olivia Newton-John passed away peacefully at her Ranch in Southern California this morning, surrounded by family and friends. We ask that everyone please respect the family's privacy during this very difficult time," her husband, John Easterling, wrote in a statement on the singer's verified Instagram account. "Olivia has been a symbol of triumphs and hope for over 30 years sharing her journey with breast cancer."

The singer revealed in September 2018 that she was treating cancer at the base of her spine. It was her third cancer diagnosis, following bouts with breast cancer in the early '90s and in 2017.

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/08/entertainment/olivia-newton-john-obit/index.html

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #303 on: August 08, 2022, 10:27:37 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #304 on: August 08, 2022, 11:39:57 PM »
Olivia Newton-John Dead at 73

Olivia Newton-John has died. She was 73. The iconic performer's family confirmed her death via her Instagram account, revealing she died at home in Southern California on Monday. Olivia is known best for her role as Sandy in the classic film 'Grease,' as well as her musical endeavors, including hits like 'Physical' and 'I Honestly Love You.'

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #304 on: August 08, 2022, 11:39:57 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #305 on: August 09, 2022, 05:16:48 AM »
Olivia Newton-John dies aged 73 | 9 News Australia

Legendary Australian singer, actress and entertainer Oliva Newton-John has died peacefully at her California ranch surrounded by family and friends.

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Re: Media Today
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Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #306 on: August 09, 2022, 09:34:26 PM »

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Re: Media Today
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Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #307 on: August 10, 2022, 06:00:10 AM »
Roger E. Mosley, Actor on ‘Magnum, P.I.,’ Dies at 83

He also starred as a blues/folk legend in 'Leadbelly' and was a regular in blaxploitation films like 'The Mack.'


From left: Larry Manetti, John Hillerman, Tom Selleck and Roger E. Mosley of 'Magnum, P.I.'

Roger E. Mosley, who portrayed Theodore “T.C.” Calvin, the helicopter pilot and buddy of Tom Selleck’s character on all eight seasons of the original Magnum, P.I., died Sunday. He was 83.

Mosley died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of injuries incurred in a car accident in nearby Lynwood three days earlier, his daughter, Ch-a, told The Hollywood Reporter.

On the big screen, Mosley was at his most memorable as blues and folk singer Huddie Ledbetter (“The Midnight Special”) in the period piece Leadbelly (1976), directed by Gordon Parks. In his review, Roger Ebert wrote that Mosley played the part “with great strength” and called the film “one of the best biographies of a musician I’ve ever seen.”

Mosley also was a standout in blaxploitation films, playing the angry brother of the fresh-out-of-prison Goldie (Max Julien) in the classic The Mack (1973) and starring in Hit Man (1972), Sweet Jesus, Preacherman (1973) and Darktown Strutters (1975).

And in The Greatest (1977), Mosley — a sturdy 6-foot-2 and 215 pounds in his prime — portrayed Sonny Liston and got whupped by Muhammad Ali.

The likable actor appeared on 158 of the 162 episodes of CBS’ Magnum, P.I., created by Donald Bellisario and Glen A. Larson. T.C. was a buddy of Selleck’s Thomas Magnum from their days in Vietnam; his character owned a helicopter charter company in Oahu called Island Hoppers, which came in handy on the series that aired from December 1980 through May 1988.

According to Mosley, Gerald McRaney was all set to play T.C. before the producers realized they needed a person of color in the main cast. Selleck thought of Mosley from a prison film they had done together, 1973’s Terminal Island, and suggested him for the part.

The Los Angeles native was busy making movies at the time and didn’t want a job on a television show, but his agent talked him into at least doing the Magnum pilot.

As Mosley remembered it, his agent told him: ” ‘It’s starring this guy Tom Selleck. Tom Selleck has made about five pilot shows … and none of them has sold. So here’s what you do, Roger: Sign up for the show, go over to Hawaii, they’ll treat you good for the 20 days it will take to shoot the [pilot], you’ll get a lot of money, and then you come home. A show with Tom Selleck always fails, and you’ll be fine.’

“Well, 8 1/2 years later … “

Mosley in real life was a licensed private helicopter pilot (something the producers discovered after he was hired, he said) but not allowed to fly on the series.

At the start, the writers had T.C. as the owner of a struggling helicopter business, but Mosley refused to “be the only Black person in Hawaii and be broke,” he said. “And they reversed. They decided Tom would be broke, and I would be financially well off — except I was always bailing him out.”

Mosley also made his character a graduate of Grambling State University, a lover of books and poetry, and a guy who didn’t party.

“They [the Magnum writers] keep writing for me to smoke and drink, but I won’t do it,” he said in a 1982 interview in Ebony. “I never get high, smoke or drink on the show or in real life. That’s not what I want Black kids to see.”

Born on Dec. 18, 1938, Roger Earl Mosley was raised by his mother, Eloise, in the Imperial Courts project in Watts. He was a wrestler in high school and a swimming coach in the neighborhood.

As recounted in a 1976 People story, Mosley was studying acting under Raymond St. Jacques at the Mafundi Institute, a community arts school in Watts, when a director from Universal came to lecture the students on self-sacrifice and said, “I know actors who had to eat ketchup sandwiches.”

Mosley got up and shouted: “You have the audacity to tell us to eat ketchup sandwiches for our art. I know people who are eating ketchup sandwiches to survive. We need somebody to give us a break.”

The director invited Mosley to visit the studio the next week.

Mosley made one of his first onscreen appearances in 1971 on an episode of CBS’ Cannon, then had small roles in The New Centurions (1972) and Hickey & Boggs (1972).

He later worked with John Wayne in McQ (1974); with James Earl Jones, Cicely Tyson and Louis Gossett Jr. in The River Niger (1976); and, as football player Puddin Patterson Sr., in Semi-Tough (1977), starring Burt Reynolds.

Post-Magnum, he starred opposite Nell Carter on the CBS sitcom You Take the Kids, as Coach Ricketts on ABC’s Hangin’ With Mr. Cooper and as Milt Johnson on Showtime’s Rude Awakening. He also appeared in the movies Heart Condition (1990), Unlawful Entry (1992), Pentathlon (1994) and A Thin Line Between Love & Hate (1996).

Survivors also include his wife, Antoinette (“Toni”) — they were together for nearly 60 years — son Brandonn; grandson Austin; and Rahsan, among his many nieces and nephews

Ch-a wrote on Facebook: “We could never mourn such an amazing man. He would HATE any crying done in his name. It is time to celebrate the legacy he left for us all. I love you daddy. You loved me too. My heart is heavy but I am strong. I will care for mommy, your love of almost 60 years. You raised me well and she is in good hands. Rest easy.”

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/tv/tv-news/roger-e-mosley-dead-magnum-1235194403/

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #307 on: August 10, 2022, 06:00:10 AM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #308 on: August 10, 2022, 03:49:45 PM »
New details emerge after FBI raid of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago | WNT

Former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate was raided by the FBI and sources told ABC News the search was related to allegations Trump improperly removed documents from the White House.

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #308 on: August 10, 2022, 03:49:45 PM »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Media Today
« Reply #309 on: August 10, 2022, 09:25:43 PM »
Trump Desperate After Mar-a-Lago Home Raided by FBI

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