Author Topic: U.S. Politics  (Read 876 times)

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #20 on: November 10, 2021, 01:12:26 PM »
Biden rolls out multibillion-dollar plan to upgrade aging U.S. ports after passage of infrastructure bill

The Biden administration outlined several initiatives on Tuesday aimed at addressing immediate supply-chain challenges and other disruptions affecting global commerce, a move that follows the passage of the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

The $1 trillion infrastructure bill, the single largest federal investment in American history, includes $17 billion for infrastructure improvements at coastal and inland ports, waterways and ports of entry along the U.S. border.


WASHINGTON – The Biden administration outlined several initiatives on Tuesday aimed at addressing immediate supply chain challenges and other disruptions affecting global commerce.

Several senior administration officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to share details of the proposed plans, said the administration will begin work within the next 60 days with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on $4 billion worth of construction work at coastal ports, inland waterways as well as other corps-eligible facilities.

The plan will also identify and prioritize $3.4 billion in upgrades to obsolete inspection facilities that will make international trade more efficient through the northern and southern borders, a senior administration official said.

“This is a long-overdue infrastructure improvement and it has clearly been a bottleneck in the past,” the person added.

The officials said the administration plans to standardize data-sharing requirements for shipping lines, terminal operators, railroads, truckers, warehouses and cargo owners.

“There is not a lot of data-sharing among the private sector and participants in the goods movement chain,” the official said, adding that the lack of data exchange causes delays and inefficiencies as cargo moves from one part of the supply chain to another.

The U.S. Digital Service is working with the Federal Maritime Commission and the joint program office at the Department of Transportation to build a data framework that will help move goods more efficiently, the senior Biden administration official said.

“This is one of the more important but less visible parts of this program,” the person added.

The world’s supply chain – already exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic – is continuing to bear the brunt of surging consumer demand, labor shortages and overseas manufacturing delays, which has led to higher transportation costs and inflation.

On Wednesday, President Joe Biden will visit the Port of Baltimore to discuss how the $1 trillion infrastructure bill passed by lawmakers Friday will improve ports and strengthen supply chains.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill, which passed the Senate in August but sat idle in the House for months, will finance colossal upgrades to America’s roads, bridges, airports, seaports and rail systems.

The bill, the single largest federal investment in American history, includes $17 billion in infrastructure improvements at coastal and inland ports, waterways and ports of entry along the U.S. border.

The measure, which Biden has yet to sign into law, includes an additional $110 billion to repair roads, bridges as well as other major transportation projects across the United States.

When asked for the timing of these investments, a senior administration official said that work was “already underway” on some projects while other programs would take anywhere from 45 days to 90 days.

The officials did not indicate when Biden would sign the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

The bill’s passage came on the heels of Biden’s attendance at the annual forum of the “Group of 20,” or G-20, referring to the 20 major economies that account for more than 80% of world GDP and 75% of global trade.

While at the G-20, Biden convened a summit alongside leaders from 14 other countries and the European Union calling for their unbending commitment on supply chain issues.

“Supply chains are something that most of our citizens never think twice about until something goes wrong. And during this pandemic, we’ve seen delays and backlogs of goods from automobiles to electronics, from shoes to furniture,” Biden said in his debut at the G-20 since becoming president.

“Ending the pandemic is the ultimate key to unlocking the disruptions we’re all contending with. But, we have to take action now, together with our partners in the private sector, to reduce the backlogs that we’re facing,” he said.

Now that the pandemic has highlighted vulnerabilities in the system, he said, “we cannot go back to business as usual.”

Last month, the Biden administration unveiled a plan to run operations 24/7 at the California ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the nation’s busiest port complex.

Shortly thereafter, the twin California ports, which account for 40% of sea freight entering the United States, announced new fines on carriers in order to clear the intensifying logjam of cargo ships.

Starting on Nov. 1, offloaded containers moved by trucks will have nine days before fines start accruing. Containers scheduled to move by rail will have three days. In accordance with these deadlines, carriers will be charged $100 for each lingering container per day.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/09/supply-chain-fix-biden-administration-to-spend-more-than-4-billion-on-aging-us-ports.html

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2021, 01:04:53 PM »
Pro-infrastructure Republicans are facing a barrage of abuse from furious Trump supporters: report
https://www.rawstory.com/trump-supporters-infrastructure/

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2021, 01:07:43 PM »
‘Somebody’s going to get killed’: Dem lawmaker hammers GOP for refusing to punish Gosar for violent video
https://www.rawstory.com/kevin-mccarthy-paul-gosar/

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2021, 01:09:31 PM »
President Biden touts infrastructure bill at Port of Baltimore, says it will boost economy
https://foxbaltimore.com/news/local/president-biden-touts-infrastructure-bill-at-port-of-baltimore-says-it-will-boost-economy

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #24 on: November 11, 2021, 11:28:43 PM »
And right wing Republicans in Indiana voted against President Biden's infrastructure bill that will revitalize Indiana.

HOWEY: Biden infrastructure bill will bring $9 billion to Indiana
The bill will bring more than $8 billion to Indiana just to revitalize roads and bridges




INDIANAPOLIS — In a week after the Dow crossed 36,000 for the first time ever and 531,000 new jobs were created in October, House Democrats aided by 13 Republicans – though none from the Indiana delegation – voted late Friday night to pass President Biden’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill by a 228-206 vote. Six progressive Democrats voted against the measure after Speaker Nancy Pelosi received commitments on the Build Back Better Act to split the votes from this record infrastructure bill.

The bill will bring more than $8 billion to Indiana to revitalize roads and bridges; $751 million to ensure safe, clean drinking water; $680 million to improve public transportation systems; $350 million to expand broadband internet access, especially in rural areas; and $20 million for Indiana to respond to extreme weather events.

But like just about everything else in this era of American politics, the infrastructure bill was characterized as “solving problems” in the words of Democrat U.S. Rep. Frank Mrvan, or denounced as a “socialist scheme” according to Republican U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski, despite the fact that U.S. Sen. Todd Young helped negotiate the version that passed the Senate. Young voted no because it would have been followed by President Biden’s Build Back Better bill.

“We have discussed the need to make desperately needed investments in our infrastructure and broadband technology for too long,” Mrvan told the NWI Times following the House vote. “Today, we delivered.”

Walorski said, “As Hoosier families face the devastating ramifications of President Biden’s inflation and supply chain crises, President Biden and the Democrats’ socialist tax and spend scheme is astonishingly out of touch with the American people.”

U.S. Reps. Larry Bucshon, R-Newburgh, and Jim Baird, R-Greencastle called the bill a “Trojan Horse” designed to pave the way for future spending.

Walorski, Bucshon and Baird have rediscovered their fiscal conservatism, which was missing during the $7 trillion in additional debt accrued under President Trump. Hoosier Republicans didn’t balk at receiving a portion of the estimated $28 billion the Trump administration paid to American farmers from 2017 and 2020 as part of the Market Facilitation Program for losses driven by tariffs that China placed on agricultural imports from the U.S. in retaliation for Trump’s trade war.

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act comes on the heels of Biden’s American Rescue Plan last spring that will bring some $4 billion in federal investments to Indiana, including $1.28 billion for municipalities. ARP funds will also fund Gov. Eric Holcomb’s $500 million READI grants. So Hoosier governments are going to be seeing an unprecedented $13 billion over the next four or five years.

Recently released state-level data demonstrate that the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will deliver an array of upgrades for Indiana, coming some 16 years after the $3.8 billion Indiana Toll Road lease fueled Gov. Mitch Daniels’ 10-year, fully funded road program that includes remaking the U.S. 31 freeway and extending I-69 from Bloomington to Indianapolis.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was passed and signed by President Obama in February 2009 during the Great Recession and included $1.4 billion for Medicaid expansion (HIP 2.0), $1.3 billion for education, $650 million for roads and bridges, $400 million for nutrition and another $600 million for weatherization, water quality, housing, public transit and child care.

The historic Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is designed to:

- Repair and rebuild Indiana roads and bridges with a focus on climate change mitigation, resilience, equity, and safety for all users, including cyclists and pedestrians. In Indiana there are 1,111 bridges and over 5,478 miles of highway in poor condition with this legislation providing $6.6 billion.

- Improve healthy, sustainable transportation options for millions of Americans with the state expecting to receive nearly $680 million over five.

- Build a network of electric vehicle chargers to facilitate long-distance travel and provide convenient charging options with Indiana receiving $100 million over five years.

- Help connect every American to reliable high-speed internet. According to the White House, 16% of Indiana households do not have an internet subscription, and 3.2% of Hoosiers live in areas where, under the FCC’s benchmark, there is no broadband infrastructure. Indiana will receive a minimum allocation of $100 million that will provide access to at least 217,000 Hoosiers who currently lack it.

- Prepare more of our infrastructure for the impacts of climate change, cyber attacks, and extreme weather events. From 2010 to 2020, Indiana experienced 34 extreme weather events, costing the state up to $10 billion in damage. Indiana will expect to receive $20 million over five years to protect against wildfires and $20 million to protect against cyber attacks.

- Deliver clean drinking water to every American and eliminate the nation’s lead service lines and pipes. Indiana will expect to receive $751 million over five years to improve water infrastructure.

- Airports in Indiana would receive approximately $170 million for infrastructure development for airports over five years.


https://www.wthr.com/article/news/politics/howey-biden-infrastructure-bill-will-bring-9-billion-to-indiana/531-4634e4cf-6566-4bfa-9d67-f9f66f1d48e2

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2021, 12:23:30 AM »
Right wing nut and American traitor Marjorie Taylor Greene is strongly advocating for Trump's deranged base to harass and threaten the 13 Republicans that voted for President Biden's Infrastructure Bill which revitalizes American cities. These members of Congress are getting death threats from these deranged lunatics all because they voted "YES" so that roads, bridges, ports, freeways can be updated with sound infrastructure. Rural areas will get high speed broadband internet along with clean drinking water and families with children will get child tax credits. Only an Anti American would vote against repairing American cities and helping working families. And the GOP did except for 13 and now they are being threatened by nuts like Marjorie Taylor Greene. She voted against Georgia and America. Criminal Donald claimed every week he would pass an Infrastructure Bill and failed miserably. Now Trump's stooges are on the attack because President Biden and the Democrats delivered for the American people.

'The calls will continue': Marjorie Taylor Greene snaps at accusations she encouraged her followers to harass lawmakers
https://www.rawstory.com/marjorie-taylor-greene-2655546482/

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2021, 11:42:04 PM »
'Where is Kevin McCarthy?': CNN panel buries GOP leader for letting his members encourage death threats



House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) was dragged over the coals on CNN on Sunday morning as panelists pointed out the toxic atmosphere in the House since the Jan 6th insurrection has grown worse as a few GOP members have encouraged violence against their colleagues.

Acting as host, CNN's Kaitlan Collins summed up the problem by asking, "Where is Kevin McCarthy."

With panelists citing Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) for calling some of her colleagues "traitors" and tweeting out their congressional phone numbers, and Rep Paul Gosar (R-AZ) posting a video of him killing Rep. Alexandria Ocasio -Cortez (D-NY), questions were raised about when McCarthy would rein his caucus in.

According to Paul Kane of the Washington Post, "Look, the House of Representatives ... it is a cauldron. It has never healed itself or come close to healing itself after Jan 6th. The Senate still has tensions that are there, the House is still heated. They have magnetometers set outside the chamber -- every member has to walk through to prove that they don't have a weapon on them. It seems a little bit ridiculous at times to think, all right, these are members of Congress, come on."

After Collins brought up the absence of McCarthy, the Daily Beast's Jackie Kucinich added, "It's an excellent question. I'm sure a lot of those members that are receiving these death threats want an answer to it and they're entitled to it."

Tarini Parti of the Wall Street Journal interjected, "I think what's interesting, the members who voted for it [the infrastructure bill] are moderate Republicans who need to win re-elections. You would think the Republican leadership would want them to win the re-election and would support them because they think this is the type of issue if they vote for it, they would help re-elect them."

Watch below:


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #27 on: November 15, 2021, 12:10:44 AM »
Who in their right mind would be against repairing and revitalizing communities and states?

31% of Americans who are far radical right wingers are against removing lead pipes so they can have clean drinking water. They are against repairing roads with potholes, against securing bridges, updating the railroad, high speed internet and so many more essential updates we need. The GOP calls this "socialism" and they all voted against this bill except for 13 Republicans. Other countries like Japan update their infrastructure all the time and have surpassed the United States in mass transit and technology. Republicans want us to lag behind these other countries as they lead the world. It's about time America leads the world once again and with Republicans you will never have that as we will always be last with them.             

President Biden to sign big infrastructure bill with $13B for N.J. on Monday. Here’s what to expect.

Billions of federal transportation dollars will flow to New Jersey in the coming months and years after President Joe Biden signs the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill Monday at a White House ceremony.

Deputy U.S. Transportation Secretary Polly Trottenberg, calling the bill the “largest investment in infrastructure since the creation of the interstate highway system,” said states could see some of the money within months, while other programs will take longer to get underway. The transportation bill sets policy for the next five years.

According to the White House and U.S. Sens. Cory Booker and Robert Menendez, New Jersey will receive at least $13.5 billion over the next five years under the infrastructure bill. Here’s what’s in the legislation that could benefit the Garden State.

- Airports. The bill includes around $272 million to help fund improvements to New Jersey airports.

-- Amtrak. The nation’s passenger railroad will get $66 million, including funds for the Northeast Corridor. Amtrak has proposed extending its route network, including running trains from New York City through New Jersey to Scranton and to Easton and Allentown, all in Pennsylvania.

-- Bridge repairs. Under the current federal formula, the state will receive $1.1 billion. The state ranked 21st among the 50 states with 502, or 7.4%‚ of its 6,801 bridges rated as deficient, according to an analysis of Federal Highway Administration data by NJ Advance Media.

-- Broadband. The White House said 31% of New Jersey households do not subscribe to an internet service. The state will receive at least $100 million to expand high-speed internet connections to least 115,468 residents. In addition, there would be funding to subsidize access for 1.6 million low-income New Jerseyans.

-- Climate change. Based on historical formulas, the state will receive $15 million to protect against wildfires.

-- Cyberattacks. New Jersey will expect $17 million to protect its computer systems.

-- Electric vehicles. To encourage the move to electric cars from gasoline-powered vehicles, the bill includes funding for a network of charging stations. New Jersey could expect to receive $104 million.

-- Gateway. Biden has endorsed it. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has touted it. Trottenberg called it a “huge priority.” Full funding is in place for a new Portal Bridge over the Hackensack River, and billions of additional dollars were put in accounts that could be used to help fund the new Hudson River tunnel. But first, the Federal Transit Administration needs to change its rating to allow the Gateway Tunnel to tap those funds. Trottenberg said the Biden administration was working “to get the next steps to that project completed.”

-- Highways. New Jersey will get $6.8 billion for highways over five years. The state has hundreds and hundreds of miles of highway rated as being in poor condition. That has helped increase commuting times by 8.8% since 2011, and costs the average motorist an additional $713 a year.

-- Lead pipes. The state Legislature has passed legislation requiring that every lead water pipe be replaced, and the infrastructure bill will provide $1 billion to help cover the cost. Newark residents in August 2019 started lining up for bottled water because of high lead levels. The American Water Works Association estimated it would cost $2.3 billion to replace New Jersey’s 350,000 lead service lines.

-- Mass Transit. Under the current plan, the state will get $4.1 billion for public transportation such as NJ Transit. Some of those funds could be used to replace outmoded buses and trains as 25% of such vehicles are past their useful life.

-- Reconnecting neighborhoods. “Almost every American city has had a highway that has plowed through communities of color or cut off a neighborhood,” Trottenberg said. There is $1 billion in the bill to reconnect communities, and Trottenberg said other federal funds could be used as well. One of those highways is Interstate 280 through Orange, and Rep. Donald Payne Jr., D-10th Dist., plans to work with local mayors and other elected officials on that issue, according to spokesman Patrick Wright.

-- Superfund. There is funding in the bill to help clean up Superfund sites, which New Jersey has more of than any other state.

-- Toll credits. New Jersey has built up $5.5 billion in credits for using toll revenues to maintain its interstate highways. The credits then are used to cover the local share of federally-funded road and bridge projects. The state has so many credits that it can’t spend them all, and the bill would let it sell them to other states at a discount. New Jersey therefore could raise billions of dollars for highway construction without raising taxes while the buying states could cover their local shares for less money.

In a Monmouth University Poll released Wednesday, 65% of Americans supported the measure, with 31% in opposition.

“I think we’re in a good spot now,” said Rep. Donald Norcross, D-1st Dist. “We’re going to keep to our message of passing bills that will help people.”

https://www.nj.com/politics/2021/11/biden-to-sign-big-infrastructure-bill-with-13b-for-nj-on-monday-heres-what-to-expect.html

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #28 on: November 15, 2021, 07:55:02 AM »
The Trump Disaster compared to Biden Progress


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2388
Re: U.S. Politics
« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2021, 12:01:15 AM »
Biden signs bipartisan infrastructure bill with Republicans on hand to celebrate win
House Democrats aim to vote on Biden’s Build Back Better framework this week




After months of negotiations, a massive bipartisan infrastructure bill that promises significant investments in every pocket of the country got President Joe Biden's signature on Monday.

"My fellow Americans, today I want you to know we hear you, and we see you. The bill I'm about to sign into law is proof that, despite the cynics, Democrats and Republicans can come together and deliver results," Biden said. "We can deliver real results for real people we see in ways that really matter each and every day to each person out there. And we're taking a monumental step forward to 'Build Back Better' as a nation."

Biden was joined by a bipartisan group for the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill signing at a White House ceremony -- marking a major victory for lawmakers from both parties who committed to working in a bipartisan way and even more so for Biden, who campaigned on a promise to work across the aisle.

"For too long, we've talked about having the best economy in the world. We've talked about asserting American leadership around the world with the best and the safest roads, railways, ports, and airports. Here in Washington, we've heard countless speeches, promises, and white papers from the experts," Biden said. "But today, we are finally getting it done. And my message to the American people is: America is moving again. And your life is going to change for the better."

The infrastructure package, with $550 billion in new spending, will address the nation's core infrastructure needs including $110 billion for highways, roads and bridges, $66 billion for passenger rail, $65 billion in high-speed internet, $55 billion for water, $39 billion in public transit, $25 billion for airports, $7.5 billion for electric vehicle charging stations, and $17 billion for ports, among other areas.

"We got it done, America," Vice President Kamala Harris said with a smile.

The White House said the plan will create on average 1.5 million jobs per year over the next decade.

Several congressional Republicans joined Democrats at the White House for the South Lawn signing ceremony, as well as GOP leaders at the state and local level. Bu in all, only about 18% of Republicans who voted for the popular legislation were in attendance -- and the entire group faces extreme criticism, and in some cases, death threats, for supporting the infrastructure package -- blowback encouraged by former President Donald Trump.

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., a leader in negotiations, spoke ahead of the president, along with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer.

"Our plan will create millions of jobs and make our country stronger, safer, and more globally competitive without raising taxes on everyday Americans," Sinema said to the crowd of approximately 800 guests gathered before American flags on the South Lawn, going to thank the bipartisan group of lawmakers who negotiated the deal.

"The American people want to see us coming together," said Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, who led negotiations for Republicans. "They know that despite our differences we should be able to figure it out and work together to solve big problems. We can start by recognizing that finding common ground to advance the interests of the American people should be rewarded not attacked," Portman added. "This should be the beginning of a renewed effort to work together on big issues facing our country."

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has touted the bill in his home state of Kentucky as "good for the country," said last week he has "other things I've got to do other than go to the signing ceremony."



The White House has announced that former lieutenant governor of Louisiana and former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who helped that city recover from Hurricane Katrina, will join the Biden administration as a senior advisor and oversee the implementation of the package. Biden will also sign an executive order on Monday creating a task force to implement the package into law, which will be co-chaired by Landrieu and National Economic Council Director Brian Deese.

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/biden-signs-bipartisan-infrastructure-bill-republicans-hand-celebrate/story?id=81181787

 

Mobile View