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Author Topic: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation  (Read 84103 times)

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1296 on: May 23, 2023, 08:26:16 AM »
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Another day passes with no sign of the leftist manifesto to explain the massacre of schoolchildren.  It is still being suppressed by the US government for political purposes.  Where are the leftists who want transparency from law enforcement and oppose "banning books"?  Suddenly silence.  All Americans should demand equal justice.  The school involved is now suing for release of the manifesto.  Imagine to be victimized in this way by a mass murdering terrorist and have to sue the government to get an explanation for why it happened.  It is a sad world when the justice department protects a child murderer over the interest of victims.

Another day, and another off topic post from you, this has nothing to do with the January 6th insurrection. But Trump insurrectionists are still going to prison and so will Donald Trump.   

Man gets 14 years in 1/6 case, longest sentence imposed yet
https://apnews.com/article/jan-6-capitol-peter-schwartz-insurrection-9176bad22fff2bafaea5c32ce06bb772

Texas militia member sentenced to almost 5 years in prison in Jan. 6 case
https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/4014482-texas-militia-member-sentenced-to-almost-5-years-in-prison-in-jan-6-case/

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1296 on: May 23, 2023, 08:26:16 AM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1297 on: May 23, 2023, 08:32:20 AM »
"Historically dangerous efforts to oppose by force the lawful transfer of power following the 2020 presidential election" 

Justice Dept slams Jan 6 Oath Keepers requests for leniency:

"Defendants were not mere trespassers or rioters & they are not comparable to any other defendant who has been convicted for a role in the attack on the Capitol".


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1298 on: May 23, 2023, 08:38:40 AM »
Feds continue to slam Jan 6 defendants arguments Trump "authorized" them:

DOJ filing: "Courts in (DC) have considered various defendants’ arguments that the former president’s words immunized their actions on Jan 6. To the government’s knowledge, all these arguments have failed".

A wide view of the January 6th insurrection with the Trump mob about to overrun Capitol Police.



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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1298 on: May 23, 2023, 08:38:40 AM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1299 on: May 23, 2023, 09:45:49 PM »
Justice Dept will seek 78-months prison in high-profile Capitol riot case of Pauline Bauer of Pennsylvania. They'll argue Bauer "physically accosted at least one officer and made incendiary threats to kill Nancy Pelosi".





Pizzeria Owner Who Said Nancy Pelosi Needed to ‘Hang’ Convicted of Jan. 6 Charges



The Pennsylvania pizzeria owner who demanded that police at the U.S. Capitol “bring Nancy Pelosi out” to the mob of Donald Trump supporters on Jan. 6 has been convicted of all five charges against her.

Pauline Bauer, 55, who memorably spouted sovereign citizen talking points before U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden, was charged with obstruction of an official proceeding of Congress, a felony that carries a potential 20-year prison sentence, and misdemeanor charges of trespassing and disorderly conduct.

According to prosecutors, Bauer screamed at police gathered in the Capitol to produce then-Speaker of the House Pelosi (D-Calif.), who was among the lawmakers at the Capitol that day to certify Joe Biden‘s 2020 electoral win. Bauer was standing approximately 30 feet from the House Speaker’s office when she was recorded by police-worn body cameras.

“Bring that f— b– out here now,” Bauer said, according to a Justice Department press release Tuesday. “Bring her out. Bring her out here. We’re coming in if you don’t bring her out here.”

When a Metropolitan Police Department officer tried to push Bauer away from the area he was protecting, she engaged in a confrontation, the DOJ says.

“You back up,” she screamed. “Don’t even try.” Prosecutors say that she then pushed the officer. She was physically removed from the Rotunda by MPD officers in riot gear shortly thereafter.

Prosecutors presented evidence of Bauer’s confrontation with police in the Capitol Rotunda that day, as well as texts and social media postings both on Jan. 6 and in the days following suggesting that the pro-Trump fight was far from over.

“We need to stand firm and strong now more than ever,” she wrote in a text message on Jan. 8.

Evidence also showed that Bauer was among the thousands of Americans who believed the false claims that Biden won the election due to voter fraud.

“We took over our capital [sic] like patriots for a stolen election one person was shot with a rubber bullet by the cops,” she wrote in a comment on Facebook the evening of Jan. 6, according to prosecutors.

The verdict comes after a two-day bench trial in front of McFadden, a Trump appointee who was the first judge to acquit a Jan. 6 defendant of multiple misdemeanor charges. Bauer represented herself, although defense attorney Carmen Hernandez — who represents Proud Boys member Zachary Rehl, currently on trial for seditious conspiracy and other charges — stayed on as advisory counsel.

At Tuesday’s sentencing hearing, McFadden told Bauer that she was one of the rioters who posed an “obvious and grave security risk,” according to CBS News. The judge reportedly rejected Bauer’s defense that she “blacked out” during the riot.

Bauer had faced off against the judge several times over his decision to keep her in pretrial detention. In one memorable exchange, she told McFadden that she was “not a person” and claimed to have diplomatic immunity before getting into a Bible quote battle with the judge. McFadden ultimately decided to revoke her release for refusing to comply with the mandatory conditions, a decision which was upheld on appeal.

According to the court docket, Bauer was released in September, some four months before her trial began.

Bauer’s co-defendant, William Blauser, pleaded guilty in November 2021 to a single misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. McFadden sentenced Blauser in February to probation and ordered him to pay a $500 fine, apparently believing that the military veteran had “probably been coerced in one way or the other by Ms. Bauer.”

Bauer faces up to 20 years on the obstruction charge and three years on the combined misdemeanor charges. McFadden has set sentencing for May 1, and according to CBS News, McFadden agreed to allow Bauer to stay out on release until then.

https://lawandcrime.com/u-s-capitol-breach/pizzeria-owner-who-said-nancy-pelosi-needed-to-hang-convicted-of-jan-6-charges/

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1300 on: May 23, 2023, 10:10:04 PM »
New January 6 video shows three hours of violent and chaotic assault on police

December 24, 2021

The Justice Department this week released a three-hour video of a battle between rioters and the police at the US Capitol Building on January 6 where rioters brandished weapons, officers were viciously beaten, and a member of the mob died on Capitol steps.

The assault on the Lower West Terrace was one of the most violent confrontations between Capitol Police and the crowd. Officers held the line until the building was cleared without letting rioters inside. Some officers have since said they did not know the Capitol had already been breached in other areas.

The video, taken from a Capitol security camera, does not have sound. It starts as officers retreat, helping each other as they stumble inside and washing their eyes out with water from chemical spray. Rioters crowd in behind them, coordinate efforts to attack and push through in infamous moments that have haunted the public, and officers, ever since.

The Justice Department released the videos after CNN and other outlets sued for access. It is the longest video from the riot released by the government thus far.

The assault

Once rioters invaded the platform built for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, every officer on it retreated into the tunnel to make their stand, shooting projectiles at rioters as they begin to enter. Members of the crowd climbed on top of each other, swinging fists and poles at the police. Brawls broke out throughout the assault, with rioters punching and kicking at officers on the front line.

Inside the tunnel, rioters pushed police further back, jabbing at them with flag poles and hitting them with a baton, spraying pepper spray, taking riot shields and crushing an officer in a door all while banging against the walls and cheering as they filmed the assault on their phones.

Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone was pulled out of the police line and into the crowd by a rioter who had his arm around his neck. The video shows Fanone eventually falling down and disappearing into the mass of rioters, where he said he was tased in the neck, beaten with a flagpole and heard rioters screaming “kill him with his own gun.” Fanone said he suffered a heart attack and fell unconscious during the attack.

Police were able to push the rioters to the edge of the tunnel’s entrance over half an hour into the assault, using pepper spray and their batons against the crowd. Still, after a long standoff with police, the rioters began a second attack on the line of officers.

At the entrance of the tunnel, rioter and QAnon supporter Rosanne Boyland lay on the ground. She had died of an accidental overdose, according to DC’s chief medical examiner. Heeding her friends’ call for help, prosecutors say two officers waded into the crowd to help Boyland.

The two officers were knocked down and dragged into the mob where they were viciously beaten with an upside-down American flag and other weapons. The attack landed one officer in the hospital with staples in his head to stop the bleeding, and the other with injuries to his face and shoulder according to court documents.

Weapons used by rioters
In the grueling attack, rioters not only used weapons but also whatever they could get their hands on to attack the police, jabbing them with metal poles, throwing furniture and an audio speaker, spraying a fire extinguisher and pepper spray, using crutches to hit the police, and assaulting the officers with fists and feet.

The rioters also used items taken from the police, including riot shields which they continued to pass up their ranks to push against the officers, and batons which they assaulted police with. At one point in the video, a person can be seen even throwing a firework at the line of officers.

Arrests

Prosecutors have arrested and charged dozens of rioters for their part in the grisly battle inside the Lower West Terrace tunnel.

Robert Morss, who prosecutors allege planned to start his own militia, is being held in jail until he faces trial after a judge slammed him for using his training as an Army Ranger to help organize and lead the mob inside the tunnel. Morss is charged with eight other men, including Patrick McCaughey, who was captured in a viral video crushing Metropolitan Police Officer Daniel Hodges in a door, and Federico Klein, a former Trump State Department official. All nine have pleaded not guilty.

Albuquerque Head, who allegedly dragged Fanone out into the crowd, has also been charged in the attack. So has Daniel Rodriguez, who prosecutors say tased Fanone in the neck. They, too, have pleaded not guilty.

Jeffrey Sabol, Jack Whitton and Ronald McAbee are part of an indictment with six other rioters who allegedly worked together to drag officers into the crowd. Whitton later boasted to friends, saying that “I fed him to the people,” referring to the officer, according to court filings. They haven’t yet entered a formal plea.

Two of the defendants who were part of the tunnel scene have already been sentenced. Devlyn Thompson, who admitted to throwing a speaker at police officers and hitting an officer in the hand with a baton, was sentenced to nearly four years in jail. Robert Palmer, who used a fire extinguisher, a wooden plank and a pole to attack police, was sentenced to more than five years in prison. Both pleaded guilty to assault with a dangerous weapon.

Watch video in link: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/12/24/politics/january-6-video-capitol-hill-riot/index.html

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1300 on: May 23, 2023, 10:10:04 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1301 on: May 24, 2023, 10:00:24 AM »
Rioters used 'bear spray' to blind police officers during Capitol Insurrection

February 12, 2021



WASHINGTON — Chilling new videos of the Capitol riot released at former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial are giving the public a more graphic picture of what police faced while being attacked by a violent mob January 6th.

The never-before-seen images show rioters shooting officers with “bear spray” – a toxic pesticide designed to help hikers fight off bears.

The newly released videos of the insurrection confirmed what DC Police Officer Christina Laurie told WUSA9 in January.

“By the time I got there, you know, officers were already getting sprayed with whatever these individuals had, which, you know, I believe they had bear mace which is literally used for bears,” she said in an interview. “I mean, I got hit with it a plenty of times that day and it just seals your eyes shut. And you just would see officers going down trying to douse themselves with water trying to open their eyes up so they can see again, and at the same point, these people are still trying to push and gain access to the Capitol.

Court documents say Jon Ryan Schafer of Columbus, Indiana was among the rioters who sprayed United States Capitol Police officers with “bear spray.” So why did accused rioters allegedly come armed to the Capitol with the powerful toxic pesticide?

"It seems like the planning was very covert and under the radar in a lot of instances,” said Dr. Kelly Johnson- Arbor, medical director at The National Capitol Poison Center.

Johnson said you don’t have to register bear spray as a weapon like you’re required to with pepper spray or mace in some states.

“And so if somebody was trying to stay anonymous, and under the radar, they might not want to purchase pepper spray, if they lived in a state where they had to register it or if it was illegal to ship it or to possess it in certain quantities,” Johnson said, adding bear spray often comes packaged in much larger canisters, so it won’t run out as quickly when it’s being used.

CNN is reporting investigators now want to know if bear spray may have played a role in the death of Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick and whether Sicknick had some sort of fatal reaction after being sprayed with it.

It’s been 35 days since he passed away still no arrests made and no cause of death released. Initial reports he died from injuries suffered from being hit with a fire extinguisher have never been confirmed.

A spokesperson for the D.C. Chief Medical Examiner's Office told us the national standard to determine the cause of death is within 90 days.

But, for cases that are more complex it could be longer.

“OCME medical examiners comply with the National Association of Medical Examiners’ (NAME) standard to determine the cause and manner of death within 90 days;” wrote DCME spokesperson Cheryle E. Adams. “However, for cases that are more complex it could be longer. Therefore, when this information is available and the decedent’s next of kin has been notified, I will provide you with the cause and manner of death.”

https://www.wusa9.com/article/news/national/capitol-riots/capitol-riot-bear-spray-officer-brian-sicknick/65-976cf73a-e850-4fc9-a7cf-d6a199b1b5ed


Watch:

January 6 United States Capitol attack • On January 6, 2021, following the defeat of U.S. President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election, a mob of his supporters attacked the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1302 on: May 24, 2023, 09:37:53 PM »
Pre-sentencing hearings begin TODAY in seditious conspiracy case of Stewart Rhodes.

Victim impact statements will be heard by judge.

Justice Dept is going to try to secure a 25-year prison sentence against Stewart Rhodes.


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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1302 on: May 24, 2023, 09:37:53 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

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Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1303 on: May 25, 2023, 08:21:43 AM »
Jan. 6 defendant who put foot on desk in Pelosi's office sentenced to 4 and a half years in prison



Washington — An Arkansas man who was photographed propping his foot on a desk in the House speaker's office during the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was sentenced to 4 and a half years in prison on Wednesday, with a judge saying he had "not shown any acceptance of responsibility."

Richard "Bigo" Barnett was convicted on eight counts including civil disorder, obstruction of an official proceeding and theft of government property after a trial earlier this year. A photo showing him seated at a desk in then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office became one of the most indelible images of Jan. 6.

On Wednesday, he appeared in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia before Judge Christopher Cooper, who handed down his sentence of 54 months. Prosecutors had sought a prison term of more than seven years, noting that Barnett admitted to entering the Capitol wielding a stun gun and carrying an American flag. Cooper seemed skeptical of some of the government's arguments and imposed a shorter sentence.

Barnett addressed the court during Wednesday's sentencing hearing, saying he was "not proud" of his conduct but arguing it was not "threatening."

"They want me to be remorseful for things I did not do," he said at one point, adding that he plans to appeal his convictions and "wasn't treated fairly."

"This was an enigma in my life," Barnett said, asking for a sentence of probation. "Jan. 6 was a traumatic day for everyone … I admit I was angry and I apologize for that."

Prosecutors told the judge that Barnett played a "very important role" in delaying the certification of the 2020 election, saying, "We are not here because he was on the front of the New York Times."

His defense team argued that prosecutors went too far in bringing some of the most severe charges and said jurors in Washington, D.C., were biased against him, echoing a claim made by many Jan. 6 defendants before him. Prosecutors did not allege Barnett took part in any violent conduct.

At trial and during Wednesday's sentencing hearing, prosecutors said the 63-year-old retired firefighter and bull rider prepared to travel to Washington ahead of Jan. 6 to keep Donald Trump in power. They said he made his way into the Capitol on the day of the riot after yelling at officers outside the building. Once inside, according to the government, Barnett stole an envelope, sat behind a desk in Pelosi's office and scrawled on a piece of paper, "Hey Nancy, Bigo was here you b*****."

It was only after he threatened police and was hit with chemical spray in the Rotunda that the government says Barnett was forced out of the Capitol. Once outside, prosecutors allege Barnett "bragged" about his entry into the speaker's office and encouraged the other rioters, saying, "This is a war." He "immediately began celebrating his conquests," the government contended on Wednesday, even as the riot was still happening.

Barnett testified in his own defense at trial and underwent a lengthy and, at times, heated cross-examination. He admitted to having regrets for using a vulgar, misogynistic phrase about Pelosi and for putting his feet on the desk. He testified he was a idiot on Jan. 6, but argued his acts were not criminal.

Prosecutors alleged that much of the defendant's testimony from the stand was not true. Since the January trial, they said, he has "demonstrated his lack of remorse and refusal to take responsibility for his actions." Barnett's attorneys contended the government "has no evidence that Mr. Barnett perjured himself."

During sentencing on Wednesday, the judge listed numerous cases in which he found Barnett to have been untruthful on the stand and in court documents – calling them an "affront" — and dismissed claims that Barnett was involuntarily pushed into the Capitol and had no intention of impeding Congress.

Barnett, prosecutors said in court on Wednesday, expressed "downright mockery of the Justice System" even after he was convicted, and demonstrated an "absolute absence of remorse" for his actions that day. He has since tried to downplay the events of Jan. 6, the government argued, with "nonsensical" claims.

After his participation in the riot, according to prosecutors, Barnett even sold signed copies of photos depicting him sitting with his feet on the desk, "a picture that he characterized as 'the face of the new anti-federalist movement.'" Barnett said at sentencing that the ploy was his former attorney's idea and he never profited from the sales.

His defense team argued that the years-long penalty the government sought was unjust and rejected prosecutors' claims that the case was not solely about the picture of him behind the desk.

"Mr. Barnett is here because of the picture," his defense attorney Jonathan Gross said in court. "The government was mad because Richard Barnett was sitting at a desk."

"The worst accusations against Mr. Barnett amounted to 20 minutes of nonviolence in the Capitol, a stolen envelope, and literally seconds of verbal altercation with a police officer," his defense attorneys wrote in pretrial filings, arguing he brought the stun gun to Washington for self-protection. "Mr. Barnett never called for violence. Never called for insurrection. He was mad, but even in his anger his rhetoric was restrained and he never called for actual violence, not on January 6 and not for any time in the future."

In sentencing Barnett to 54 months in prison, Cooper said Barnett had not shown remorse.

"While you may regret having gone there that day, you have so far not shown any acceptance of responsibility," Cooper said, adding later, "You're too old for this nonsense."

Cooper commended Barnett for his life leading up to the Jan. 6 attack, but said it was hard to reconcile the defendant's actions during the riot with the rest of his life. "It was not a spur-of-the-moment reaction," he said.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/richard-barnett-january-6-pelosi-desk-sentencing/