Users Currently Browsing This Topic:
0 Members

Author Topic: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation  (Read 83812 times)

Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1288 on: May 20, 2023, 10:23:25 PM »
Advertisement
Texas man who knocked out officer during Jan 6. Capitol riot learns his sentence


Donald Hazard, of Hurst, Texas, received a sentence of four years and nine months for physically attacking U.S. Capitol Police officers on Jan 6, 2021. - U.S. Attorney's Office/TNS/TNS

FORT WORTH, Texas — A North Texas man was sentenced to four years and nine months in prison Friday for assaulting law enforcement resulting in bodily injury during the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot, the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Columbia announced.

“His actions and the actions of others disrupted a joint session of the U.S. Congress convened to ascertain and count the electoral votes related to the 2020 presidential election,” the U.S attorney’s office said in a news release.

Donald Hazard, 44, of Hurst, was sentenced to 57 months in prison for assaulting, resisting or impeding officers.

Hazard pleaded guilty to the charge Feb. 16.

In addition to his prison sentence, U.S. District Court Judge Randolph D. Moss ordered 36 months of supervised release. Hazard also must pay a fine of $2,000.

According to court documents, Hazard was the sergeant-at-arms of the Patriot Boys of North Texas, a self-described militia.

In preparation for the riot in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6, 2021, Hazard gathered protective gear and other supplies including a military-style helmet, knuckle gloves, goggles, body armor and pepper spray, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

”Make sure you get my face and everything on your news channel. I want the enemy to know exactly who is coming after them,” Hazard said in a video that a photographer recorded at the riot.

At around 2 p.m. that day, Hazard was standing under scaffolding that had been erected over the stairs on the northwest side of the U.S. Capitol building. As Hazard and other rioters attempted to climb the steps, they were met by Capitol Police officers.

An officer approached Hazard in order to force him back. Hazard grabbed the officer as he fell and continued to fight. The two fell down the stairs and the officer hit his head and was knocked unconscious. He also had injuries on his head, foot and arm — some of which required surgery.

At another point during the riot, Hazard advanced toward a line of police officers on the west side of the Capitol with pepper spray in his hand.

At 2:56 p.m., Hazard entered the Capitol building and was inside for about five minutes. Hazard posted “selfie-style” videos inside and outside of the Capitol building and made statements including, “We’re here at the nation’s capitol and we’re storming it. We’re taking the Capitol ... This is America baby.”

Hazard was arrested Dec. 13, 2021.

This case was prosecuted by the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Columbia and the Department of Justice National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section. The U.S. attorney’s office for the Northern District of Texas assisted in the case.

The case was investigated by the Fort Worth Resident Agency of the FBI’s Dallas Field Office along with the FBI’s Washington Field Office. The Texas Department of Public Safety, the Hurst Police Department, the Metropolitan Police Department, and the U.S. Capitol Police also assisted.

In the 28 months since Jan. 6, more than 1,000 individuals have been arrested in nearly all 50 states for crimes related to the breach of the U.S. Capitol, including more than 320 individuals charged with assaulting or impeding law enforcement, according to the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Columbia.

The investigation remains ongoing.

© Fort Worth Star-Telegram

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1288 on: May 20, 2023, 10:23:25 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1289 on: May 21, 2023, 08:32:09 AM »
Donald Hazard is sentenced to 57 months prison in Jan 6 case.

Feds said: "Hazard was the Sergeant-at-Arms of the Patriot Boys of North Texas, a self-described militia. Hazard gathered protective gear, military-style helmet, knuckle gloves, goggles, body armor, and pepper spray".


Online Richard Smith

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5125
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1290 on: May 21, 2023, 09:34:47 PM »
Yet another day and no answer for the parents of the dead children in Nashville.  Maybe the lawsuit filed by the school will eventually force the FBI to hand over the manifesto.  They have no legal justification to suppress this material.  The leftist terrorist is deceased.  There is nothing to investigate from a law enforcement perspective.  Just another of growing list of judicial abuses by law enforcement and the judicial system. 

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1290 on: May 21, 2023, 09:34:47 PM »


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1291 on: May 22, 2023, 03:20:23 AM »
Jan 6 defendant Mark Ponder of DC is serving sentence at Edgefield federal prison in South Carolina, thorugh Oct 2025, according to US Bureau of Prisons.

Ponder was charged with assaulting police holding shield. Feds: "Ponder struck the shield with his pole, snapping it in two".


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1292 on: May 22, 2023, 09:14:28 AM »
These January 6th insurrectionists domestic terrorists all believe they are above the law just like their messiah Criminal Donald.


The ‘Beverly Hills Insurrectionist’ and the Big Myth About Jan. 6

Gina Bisignano became famous for participating in the Capitol riot clad in a Louis Vuitton sweater and Chanel boots, but her insurrection story reveals a deeper truth



THE FIRST TIME Gina Bisignano ran afoul of the law in Washington, D.C., she was recorded standing on a ledge in front of a broken window on the U.S. Capitol Building’s West Terrace, adorned in a Louis Vuitton sweater and Chanel boots. “We the people are not going to take it anymore. You are not going to take away our Trumpy Bear!” the Beverly Hills cosmetologist bellowed through a bullhorn on Jan. 6.

“Everybody, we need gas masks. We need weapons. We need strong, angry patriots to help our boys, they don’t want to leave. We need protection,” she yelled, her mascara running from tear gas.

Two years and multiple criminal charges later, Bisignano returned to Washington on March 1 of this year — and promptly ran afoul of the law again. Bisignano’s return journey to D.C. involved a deal she struck with prosecutors in which she pleaded guilty to four misdemeanors and two felonies and agreed to cooperate with investigators and the Department of Justice in return for special considerations at sentencing.

Nominally in D.C. to testify against a former associate, Bisignano took a detour to a vigil held near the jail where several dozen alleged insurrectionists were awaiting their trials. There, she shared details of her testimony in an ongoing trial, spoke with a convicted Jan. 6 felon, and admitted to hanging out with other Jan. 6 participants.

All of these were violations of the terms of her pre-trial release, and all of them — again — were caught on camera. But despite her Jan. 6 actions and her pre-trial agreement violations, Bisignano is not in jail. Instead, she’s on a particularly lenient version of house arrest as she awaits trial after withdrawing her guilty plea for felony obstruction of an official proceeding. She has already pleaded guilty to six counts, including felony civil disorder, and awaits sentencing after her felony trial concludes.

The supposed unjust treatment and persecution of Jan. 6 participants has become core to the prevailing conservative counter-narrative around the violent riot, an account that characterizes the participants as “political prisoners.” But contrary to the claims of heavy-handed political persecution, cases like Bisignano show how, in some instances, the legal system has afforded Jan. 6 defendants a far more judicious process than standard federal criminal defendants. And indeed, many experts believe the insurrectionists have been given far softer treatment than one might expect for attempting to storm the Capitol to block the certification of a presidential election.

“As a general trend, the January 6 people, especially given the violent nature of their protest, got off quite lightly in terms of the charges they face [and] the average sentence they face when they plead guilty and/or are found guilty,” says Wadie Said, a former federal public defender who studies national security prosecutions at the University of South Carolina School of Law. “That doesn’t mean that the result is always in their favor or that they don’t get punished, but just that their claims are certainly heard more, and their position certainly seems to be understood a little bit more.”

Early indications suggest that insurrectionists are, in fact, getting off easy. Data examined by Slate on the first anniversary of the insurrection found that Jan. 6 defendants were receiving significantly lighter sentences than what prosecutors have asked for. They also, at least as of the one-year mark, enjoyed a far higher rate of pretrial release — 70 percent — than other federal defendants, only 32 percent of whom were granted pretrial release.

Even outside of the immediate political context, other demographic factors may play a role in the disparate treatment, says Georgetown Law Professor Vida Johnson. Federal criminal defendants are disproportionately young, male people of color, and largely face charges related to drug and immigration violations — crimes that are highly racialized in their own right — whereas 93 percent of charged Jan. 6 participants are white, according to the University of Chicago Project on Security and Threats.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office declined to comment, citing the ongoing matter. In response to a request for comment, Bisignano’s lawyer Charles Peruto tells Rolling Stone, “Any comment I give would just add to the over exposure this defendant has received. Therefore, I feel it’s best to do all of my talking in court.”

For obvious reasons, Bisignano received almost immediate and arguably disproportionate attention following the Capitol breach. In an interview with The Beverly Hills Courier following the riot, she said that she was initially unaware of plans to breach the Capitol. “I didn’t know we were storming the Capitol,” she recalled thinking. “I should have dressed different.”

This sartorial claim of innocence did not seem to persuade investigators, and Bisignano was soon arrested and charged with six misdemeanors and two felonies.

Among the first wave of insurrectionists charged for their actions, Bisignano faced both a public and a legal system at the zenith of its outrage and concern over the assault. With the indictment of more central actors like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers more than a year away, Bisignano does appear to have had the book thrown at her at first. A magistrate judge imposing a $170,000 bail on her and even after making bail, a federal judge ordered her back in custody, where she spent the next month.

But Bisignano’s fortunes improved as Jan. 6 went from a source of shame among the right to a cause célèbre.

The legal tides turned for her in August 2021 when she reached a deal with prosecutors, pleading guilty to six of the counts, including two felonies, and agreeing to cooperate with the Department of Justice and investigators. In court before Judge Carl J. Nichols, Bisignano expressed contrition for her actions on the day. At that point, she was looking at between 41 to 51 months in federal prison, with hopes of receiving a lighter sentence for her help. 

But the relationship between Bisignano and prosecutors quickly deteriorated, with audio leaking in February 2022 of a conversation she had with supporters in which she spoke out against her plea deal and backtracked on her apology to Judge Nichols. Her attorney soon filed to undo her guilty plea on the felony count of obstructing an official proceeding.

Yet even with questions surrounding Bisignano’s cooperation, in a May 4 hearing concerning her pretrial violations and plea deal, Judge Nichols allowed Bisignano to back out of the guilty plea for felony obstruction of an official proceeding. Bisignano’s usefulness as a witness had also come into question, with the judge presiding over a separate case in which she provided testimony describing Bisignano as a “hot mess” and one of the worst witnesses she had ever seen take the stand.

Said characterizes the ruling as “unusual,” explaining that defendants face a high burden to reverse a guilty plea.

Ironically, the apparent latitude afforded to Bisignano by her judge has now placed her in more legal jeopardy, with a guilty verdict potentially delivering a higher sentence than she would have received as part of her deal with prosecutors.

Nichols’ ruling on her guilty plea came alongside a hearing on Bisignano’s many pretrial violations stemming from what prosecutors termed the “January 6 Block Party.”

Bisignano had long taken a liberal interpretation of her pretrial release agreement, which explicitly forbids “communications with anyone who was at the event on January 6, 2021,” speaking about the case with anyone aside from her “attorney, [the] government, and people that are directly associated with your case,” and maintaining a presence on social media. Furthermore, the terms exhort her to “avoid all contact, directly or indirectly, with any person who is or may be a victim or witness in the investigation or prosecution.”

Her visit to Washington wasn’t even the first time Bisignano had rallied on behalf of Jan. 6 participants.

A year to the day after the insurrection, on Jan. 6, 2022, Bisignano — her face partially covered by a pink Louis Vuitton scarf — appeared at a Beverly Hills rally held in honor of Ashli Babbitt, who was fatally shot by police while attempting to get closer to lawmakers. At least one other Jan. 6 participant was present at the rally. Bisignano also went to a May 2022 rally organized by a convicted Jan. 6 participant, Brandon Straka, and was caught on camera speaking with Siaka Massaquoi, an actor who entered the Capitol on Jan. 6.

It’s unclear whether prosecutors are aware of these incidents. While prosecutors cite two documents in reference to other violations, they remain restricted to the public.

But Bisignano did not have the same luck when she went to the March block party in Washington this year.   

Broadcast nightly via livestream, the festive vigil featured live music, barbecue, and pie — and even once received a call from Donald Trump, who inveighed that Jan. 6 prisoners “are being treated very, very unfairly” — an increasingly common refrain among conservative politicians and their base.

Capitalizing on the growing clout of the insurrectionists, a MAGA rapper joined the vigil on March 1 to film a music video with Micki Witthoeft, the mother of Ashli Babbitt, who was shot by Capitol police while attempting to enter the Speaker’s Lobby. (“They left blood on the Capitol steps, yeah, they set us up / Patriots fightin’ for freedom, yeah we ain’t lettin’ up / I’m a god fearing soldier, I keep my weapons up / Can’t put no needle in my arm ‘cause I’m a pure blood.”)

Bisignano herself makes a couple of appearances in the music video. On the livestream of the event, she speaks to the crowd and tearfully proclaims Ashli Babbitt “a fallen hero,” rails against the “one world agenda,” and offers a rambling summary of the testimony she had proffered in court earlier that day. Later in the night, she talks on speakerphone with Shane Jenkins, a Jan. 6 rioter convicted of smashing a window with a tomahawk and throwing objects like a desk drawer at Capitol Police.

All of this, it goes without saying, violated her pretrial release agreement — a fact Bisignano herself is caught acknowledging on camera. “I’m on pretrial, I’m not supposed to be here,” she tells another attendee, skewer of meat in hand.

“My family’s angry at me because I hang out with January 6 people and I’m on pretrial,” she adds, apparently admitting to more pretrial violations.

“All the other January 6 people do, too,” the attendee responds sympathetically.

Ultimately, Bisignano paid a price for attending the rally, though not a particularly steep one: Judge Nichols reinstated Bisignano’s house arrest, limiting her to her Beverly Hills condominium except for work, church, and doctor’s appointments.

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/gina-bisisnano-jan6-beverly-hills-insurrectionist-1234739137/

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1292 on: May 22, 2023, 09:14:28 AM »


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1293 on: May 22, 2023, 09:19:17 AM »
Seeking leniency in his Jan 6 case, defense for Julio Baquero of Florida argues: "While President Trump does not regret what he unleashed on January 6th, Mr. Baquero is deeply ashamed of his conduct that day and will spend the rest of his life atoning for his actions".


Offline Rick Plant

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8177
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1294 on: May 22, 2023, 09:23:40 AM »
In new letter seeking leniency for Capitol riot defendant Noah Bacon, a relative writes that Bacon was "suckered by Trump's rhetoric and lies" and says Bacon was a "fool" to believe Trump.

She says Bacon expected Trump to make a "big announcement" with proof about the election.


JFK Assassination Forum

Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1294 on: May 22, 2023, 09:23:40 AM »


Online Richard Smith

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5125
Re: 1/6 Insurrection Investigation
« Reply #1295 on: May 22, 2023, 01:35:04 PM »
Another day passes with no sign of the leftist manifesto to explain the massacre of schoolchildren.  It is still being suppressed by the US government for political purposes.  Where are the leftists who want transparency from law enforcement and oppose "banning books"?  Suddenly silence.  All Americans should demand equal justice.  The school involved is now suing for release of the manifesto.  Imagine to be victimized in this way by a mass murdering terrorist and have to sue the government to get an explanation for why it happened.  It is a sad world when the justice department protects a child murderer over the interest of victims.