Author Topic: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?  (Read 251 times)


Online Steve M. Galbraith

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2021, 09:51:29 PM »
https://www.onthetrailofdelusion.com/post/was-lee-harvey-oswald-a-man-of-the-right
I guess we can debate whether he truly understood and embraced Marxism or whether it was simply something he found that answered his questions as to why the world he grew up in was so miserable and so unjust. Which, in his defense, it largely was. Perhaps a bit of both (and I do think some of the key concepts of Marxism were understood by him in some detail; if you correct his spelling and grammatical errors in his writings, as Noman Mailer did in his book on Oswald, you can see that they're somewhat sophisticated).

But the evidence that he disliked, indeed hated, the American political and economic systems is, for me, conclusive. He found it unjust and irredeemable. Indeed, he told Michael Paine shortly before the assassination that the American system had to be completely overthrown, that incremental changes would not work. It could not reformed; it had to be replaced. And in a Marxist/leftist type direction.

The only response to all of this is, as Weisberg and Garrison argued, that it was an act or a cover; that because his favorite TV show as a teenager was about a man pretending to be a Marxist (Herbert Philbrick) that he too was acting out this fake life. Either for his own bizarre reasons or because he was directed to do so by others. I find it quite unlikely that someone would direct him at the age of 16 to create this cover or "legend." For what purpose? But then again I'm not a JFK conspiracist.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2021, 10:21:49 PM by Steve M. Galbraith »

Online Jon Banks

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2021, 01:44:35 AM »
No, he was a Leftwinger. A Liberal who maybe agreed with some aspects of Marxism.

What most Conservative Americans don’t seem to understand about the Left is that there’s a long anti-Communist tradition among Western Liberals. Some of the most rabid anti-Communists of the postwar era were Liberals (ie George Orwell).

Based on Oswald’s writing and things he told people close to him after he returned to the US from the USSR, he wasn’t a Communist by that time and didn’t view the Soviet system as superior to the American political system. In the summer of 63’ he wrote that ‘he chose the LESSER evil by returning to the United States’.

He rejected Racial Segregation and supported the Civil Rights movement which put him in line with most Liberals in the early 60s. It also makes sense that he agreed with Kennedy’s support of MLK and Civil Rights.

When I look at Oswald’s biography, the biggest thing that sticks out for me are his numerous friends and associates who were rightwing or rabid anti-Comminists.

I can’t name any friends or associates of Oswald in the US who were Far-Left or communists. Isn’t that odd? The Paines are close to the only known Far-Left associates of Oswald and I suspect that they were Liberal anti-Communists.

As for his support of Cuba/Castro, I’m not certain that it was genuine or based on devotion to communism. Castro was still a darling of the Left in the early-60s. People on the Left were still optimistic that he might be a great leader for Cuba at that time.

Castro, when he visited Harlem in the early 1960s, called out the hypocrisy of the US in terms of the way Black Americans were treated. The contradictions were noted by Dr. Martin Luther King, who opposed imperialism and colonialism:

Quote
Cuba’s willingness to exploit the United States’s contradictory foreign policy position and domestic racial turmoil helped spur the White House to resort to terrorism and other illegal, covert reprisals against the island nation. It also reinforced the repressive instincts already being brought to bear against American blacks. Ten days after Martin Luther King, Jr. denounced the botched Bay of Pigs invasion as “a disservice … to the whole of humanity” and called on the United States to “join the revolution” against “colonialism, reactionary dictatorship, and systems of exploitation” the world over, the Senate convened a committee investigating Cuban influence on American blacks

https://newrepublic.com/article/131793/castro-came-harlem


I tend to view Oswald and the JFK assassination within the broader context of what was happening in the US in those times. I don’t know if others do this.


Even if we accept at face value that Oswald was a devoted Marxist or Communist when he was a naïve teenager, we're faced with the question of why he returned to the US. Most likely he became disillusioned with Soviet style communism while living in the USSR and his remarks in 1963 where he ridiculed communists and the Soviet Union were genuine...
« Last Edit: September 13, 2021, 02:42:11 PM by Jon Banks »

Offline John Mytton

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2021, 01:52:24 AM »

But the evidence that he disliked, indeed hated, the American political and economic systems is, for me, conclusive. He found it unjust and irredeemable. Indeed, he told Michael Paine shortly before the assassination that the American system had to be completely overthrown, that incremental changes would not work. It could not reformed; it had to be replaced. And in a Marxist/leftist type direction.


Mr. RANKIN. Did he tell you why he had shot at General Walker?
Mrs. OSWALD. I told him that he had no right to kill people in peacetime, he had no right to take their life because not everybody has the same ideas as he has. People cannot be all alike. He said that this was a very bad man, that he was a fascist, that he was the leader of a fascist organization, and when I said that even though all of that night be true, just the same he had no right to take his life, he said if someone had killed Hitler in time it would have saved many lives. I told him that this is no method to prove your ideas, by means of a rifle.


JohnM

Offline Tom Scully

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2021, 05:57:08 AM »
Mr. RANKIN. Did he tell you why he had shot at General Walker?
Mrs. OSWALD. I told him that he had no right to kill people in peacetime, he had no right to take their life because not everybody has the same ideas as he has. People cannot be all alike. He said that this was a very bad man, that he was a fascist, that he was the leader of a fascist organization, and when I said that even though all of that night be true, just the same he had no right to take his life, he said if someone had killed Hitler in time it would have saved many lives. I told him that this is no method to prove your ideas, by means of a rifle.


JohnM

Two weeks after Oswald allegedly shot at Edwin Walker, George DeMohrenschildt was meeting in NYC with Bush's close friend, Tom Devine, on April 25, 1963.

....
April 25, 1963 meeting : Tom Devine AKA WuBriny/1 DeMohrenschildt and Clemard Charles
https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=8627#relPageId=2&search=knickerbocker
And
https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=8627#relPageId=6&search=knickerbocker
....

https://www.acslaw.org/expertforum/vance-muse-and-the-racist-origins-of-right-to-work/
Vance Muse and the Racist Origins of Right-to-Work | ACS
Feb 22, 2018 — The idea for modern Right-to-Work laws did not originate with Muse. Rather it came from Dallas Morning News's William Ruggles, ...

https://www.aei.org/carpe-diem/dallas-morning-news-editorial-writer-william-ruggles-coined-the-term-right-to-work-on-labor-day-in-1941/#:~:text=Dallas%20Morning%20News%20editorial%20writer%20William%20Ruggles%20(pictured%20above)%20“,with%20or%20without%20union%20membership.
Dallas Morning News editorial writer William Ruggles (pictured above) “thought every American had a right to work.” He used those words in an editorial on September 1, 1941 (Labor Day) asking for a 22nd amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteeing the right to work with or without union membership.Sep 1, 2014

New Hampshire Senate passes right to work bill, advancing ...
Feb 11, 2021 — The New Hampshire Senate passed a “right to work” bill Thursday, advancing a longstanding Republican effort to make union membership dues ...

https://www.wmur.com/article/nh-house-rejects-buries-right-to-work-bill-on-key-roll-call-of-199-175/36623777
NH House rejects, buries right-to-work bill on key roll call of ...
Jun 3, 2021 — The New Hampshire House soundly killed the latest attempt by state and national proponents to pass right-to-work legislation and then buried ...



From an old post of mine on another thread,,,,
Quote
...His daughter Marilou Ruggles Core was linked in a CIA report to a former O.S.S. officer who became an India scholar at Harvard
and was the son of the Dallas Morning News music columnist. Marilou Ruggles married Jesse R Core III, a recent DMN reporter,
in 1950.
Marilou, in that same CIA report, is linked to two CIA officers who served in India, as well as her husband Jesse who admitted to
being a CIA asset. That CIA report describes Jesse as serving in Calcutta with one of those two linked CIA officers, David G Baldwin.

Kerry Thornley claimed his mentor, Clint Bolton, a former AP journalist reporting from India, was a close friend of Jesse Core.

J Walton Moore served in India in 1950, Ann Goodpasture in 1954.

Clay Shaw hired Baldwin as Trade Mart PR director upon his return from Calcutta in 1952 and in 1955 hired Jesse Core as Baldwin's
replacement. David G Baldwin informed Clay Shaw a week after Shaw was arrested that he (Baldwin), was godfather and first cousin of Liz Ziegler, wife of Jim Garrison.

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=54933#relPageId=2




Jesse Core reported to the FBI observing Oswald handing out fliers near the Trade Mart. Oswald is accused of firing a shot through
a window at 4011 Turtle Creek Blvd.
The thread at this link, https://www.jfkassassinationforum.com/in...#msg516681 is not very long. Please read it.:
[Image: attachment.php?attachmentid=9240&stc=1]

J.F. Stuart Arthur rented in 1962 the home he owned (since 1940) at 4011 Turtle Creek Blvd. to Edwin Walker.


W. Orrin Miller purchased the 4011 Turtle Creek property from JF Stuart Arthur in summer, 1963, one year after Arthur rented that property to Edwin Walker.

W. Orrin Miller is linked to George Bush....



Quote:
https://www.ancestry.com/boards/topics.o...50/mb.ashx
.......
Mr. Miller helped former President George Bush draw up incorporation papers for Zapata Petroleum when he first moved to Dallas TX , his son said.

"I can't prove any of that; it's a story he used to tell me," Robert Miller said.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2021, 06:09:10 AM by Tom Scully »

Online Jon Banks

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2021, 01:45:01 AM »
Michael Paine on Oswald’s political views:
Quote
Paine, a liberal and longtime member of the American Civil Liberties Union, would later describe Oswald as a “pipsqueak,” but one whose politics he tried to understand.

“He told me he became a Marxist in this country by reading books and without having ever having met a communist,” Paine said in an interview following the assassination.
Quote
in their conversations Oswald never revealed hostility toward Kennedy.

“I expressed my appreciation of President Kennedy and he didn’t ever argue with me on that point,” Paine said in an interview.

In a 2013 essay he titled, “My Experience with Lee Harvey Oswald,” Paine recalled that Oswald once declared emphatically that “change only comes through violence.”

“I’d also heard him say that President Kennedy was the best president he had in his lifetime.
Looking back on what happened, these two statements seem impossibly contradictory … how could a man want to kill a president whom he thought was the best president he’d had in his lifetime?”

https://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/news/michael-paine-debated-politics-with-jfk-assassin-lee-harvey-oswald-dies-a/


George de Mohrenschildt on Oswald’s political views:
Quote
Kennedy’s efforts to alleviate and to end segregation were also admired by Lee, who was sincerely and profoundly committed to a complete integration of Blacks and saw it in the future of the United States. “I am willing to fight for racial equality and would die fighting if necessary,” He told me once. Because of his poor, miserable childhood, he probably compared himself to the Blacks and the Indians and commiserated with them. In this he was so different and so noble compared with the Southern trash and rednecks, whose segregationism stems from their fear of the Blacks, of their strength and of the possibility of their prominence in every field of human endeavor. Education for the Blacks was an anathema for them, while Lee was fullheartedly for it. He loved black children and admired their cute and outgoing ways. He also was fond of the black music and folklore with which he as familiar from his childhood days in New Orleans.

Lee despised the reactionary groups, the white supremacists, the so called “hate groups,” and did not hide his feelings.

http://22november1963.org.uk/george-de-mohrenschildt-i-am-a-patsy-chapter08

Quote
Lee often mentioned that the two–party system did not work well, that other points of view were not represented. He did not see the difference between a conservative democrat and a fairly liberal republican — and in that I agreed with him.
“Both republicans and democrats really did not oppose each other,” he mentioned one day, “they do not represent different points of view, but they are both solidly against [the] poor and oppressed.”
But regarding JFK, Lee did not have such a gloomy attitude and he hoped that after the Bay of Pigs fiasco Kennedy would accept coexistence with the communist world.

http://22november1963.org.uk/george-de-mohrenschildt-i-am-a-patsy-chapter10
« Last Edit: September 14, 2021, 04:34:51 AM by Jon Banks »

Online Richard Smith

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Re: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Man of the Right?
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2021, 04:00:32 PM »
I guess we can debate whether he truly understood and embraced Marxism or whether it was simply something he found that answered his questions as to why the world he grew up in was so miserable and so unjust. Which, in his defense, it largely was. Perhaps a bit of both (and I do think some of the key concepts of Marxism were understood by him in some detail; if you correct his spelling and grammatical errors in his writings, as Noman Mailer did in his book on Oswald, you can see that they're somewhat sophisticated).

But the evidence that he disliked, indeed hated, the American political and economic systems is, for me, conclusive. He found it unjust and irredeemable. Indeed, he told Michael Paine shortly before the assassination that the American system had to be completely overthrown, that incremental changes would not work. It could not reformed; it had to be replaced. And in a Marxist/leftist type direction.

The only response to all of this is, as Weisberg and Garrison argued, that it was an act or a cover; that because his favorite TV show as a teenager was about a man pretending to be a Marxist (Herbert Philbrick) that he too was acting out this fake life. Either for his own bizarre reasons or because he was directed to do so by others. I find it quite unlikely that someone would direct him at the age of 16 to create this cover or "legend." For what purpose? But then again I'm not a JFK conspiracist.

Oswald was an angry malcontent dissatisfied with his place in life.  He blamed everyone except himself.  In American society, he could turn to Marxism as a means to be the anti-hero.  Oswald needed a platform to vent his personal anger and Marxism provided that.  In addition, being a Marxist gave him notoriety as an outlier that he apparently desired.  He would not have been sought after for interviews if he had adopted a mainstream political cause.  I think his political beliefs were superficial in comparison to his own psychological impulses but that they provided an important mechanism for his violent actions.  It allowed him to view himself not as an angry nut but as some type of political revolutionary hero.

 

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