Author Topic: What's the value of a dime?  (Read 425 times)

Offline Dan O'meara

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2021, 10:52:22 PM »
Walt, why have you never asked me to search for the elusive Darryl Click?

I wanted to ask you but I wasn't sure that you would tell me to go to hell....  And I believe the man's name was Glick...Not Click.

Thank you very much, Tom....

From Mark Lane's WC testimony:

"Now, that statement was not made in the first hours of the arrest. That statement was not made until after Chief Curry had announced to the press in Dallas, on that day, November 24th that the case was closed, there would be no further investigation--Oswald was the assassin, he had acted alone, he was then dead. And as a result of the change in policy, to reopen the case and have Mr. Wade assume a position in front of the radio and television microphones and cameras of the Nation, on that evening November 24, Mr. Wade then presented what he said was the evidence "for you piece by piece." And part of the evidence which he had secured was the proof that a taxi driver named Daryl Click drove Oswald roughly from the scene to his home, to Oswald's home.
When I was in Dallas--I suppose this was on January 2d, my first trip there in reference to this matter--I spoke with a Mr. Roseboro of the Teamsters Union--they have organized the taxi drivers in Dallas--and asked him if he knew--if he could give me any information about a Daryl Click. He said he did not have the name in his files. but Texas being a right-to-work law State, it is possible, he said, that Mr. Click was a driver but not a member of that union. He referred me to the personnel department of the City Transportation Co., which he told ,he was the one company monopoly running all the taxis in Dallas.
I spoke with the City Transportation Co. personnel office, Mr. Pott, as I recalled, who checked the records, and indicated to me that there was no Daryl Click who drove a taxi in Dallas."

Taken from https://www.jfk-assassination.eu/warren/wch/vol2/page50.php

Offline John Mytton

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2021, 11:57:38 PM »
Walt, why have you never asked me to search for the elusive Darryl Click?

This was how the military liason to the ARRB reacted to my proving someone he wanted to stay missing was not missing. Douglas Horne seemed very disappointed that I identified and located Ray Crump murder trial prosecution witness, William L. Mitchell.:

Mary's Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, ...
https://www.google.com/books/edition/Mary_s_Mosaic/
Peter Janney · 2016
FOUND INSIDE
"... was Tom Scully, but he would identify himself on Amazon only as “Rational Voice.” Discussing his critical post of Mary's Mosaic in an email to a University of Georgia law professor, Scully identified himself as “a moderator at the ..."



57 years ago, the WCR explained away the mention of that name.:
https://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/warren-commission-report/appendix-12.html

I searched, anyway. This is a free site. Sign up, knock yourself out.

I found one, but in 1963 he was 9 years old. :



Seriously Tom? Did you even bother to listen to the Henry Wade clip before you wasted your time looking for "Darryl Click"?
I expect this sort of nonsense from old gullible Walt but expected better from you.


JohnM

Offline Alan Ford

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2021, 12:16:14 AM »
 

On page  626 of the WR, is the report of Secret Service inspector Thomas Kelley who was present at a 11-23- interrogation session of Lee Oswald.  Kelly wrote:....   "In response to questions put by Captain Fritz, Oswald said that immediately after having left the building where he worked, he went by bus to the theater where he was arrested;  that when he got on the bus he secured a transfer and thereafter transferred to other buses to get to his destination". ----------------------- Fritz asked him if he had ridden in a taxi that day, and Oswald then changed his story and said that when he got on the bus he found that it was going too slow and after two blocks he got off the bus and took a cab to his home; that he passed the time with the cab driver and that the cab driver had told him that the president was shot. He paid a cab fare of 85 cents.

There are several crucial differences between Whaley's story and Lee Oswald's account of his taxi ride.    Not the least of which is Lee's statement that he paid a fare of 85 cents.

Agent Bookhout's report (11/23, dictated 11/24, typed up 11/25) has Mr Oswald putting it at "approximately 85 cents"

Offline Tom Scully

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2021, 01:39:55 AM »
Seriously Tom? Did you even bother to listen to the Henry Wade clip before you wasted your time looking for "Darryl Click"?
I expect this sort of nonsense from old gullible Walt but expected better from you.


JohnM

JohnM,

I included a link to the WCR page explaining how Henry Wade's words were "transformed" from "Oak Cliff" to "Darryl Click".

When I read Walt's post, I had browser windows open for both ancestrylibrary.com and familysearch because I was pursuing a lead I had just discovered, the divorce record of Edwin A. Ekdahl just before he married Marguerite Oswald. The FBI claimed inability to find that Ekdahl in 1944 divorced his wife residing in Nyack, Rockland County, NY, in a Texarkana, Miller County, Arkansas court, of course!

I had made the mistake earlier today of exposing myself to a thread on the Ed Forum in which Armstrong's "bot" Hargrove was claiming the FBI was unable to find where Ekdahl was employed from 1943 to 1953, but I recalled he had been employed by Ebasco and that Linda Minor had done a post on her "Quixotic Joust" blog describing Ekdahl working out of an office of a Texas electric utility in the same Ft Worth building as Jack White's advert. agency was located, at the time.

https://quixoticjoust.blogspot.com/2012/05/colossal-failure-to-research-ekdahl.html

Years ago, while researching the background of the man who suggested to DeMohrenschildt the two take a ride out to meet the Oswald couple, Col. Lawrence Orloff, I discovered Orloff grew up in the same area in Boston at the same time as Edwin A. Ekdahl and I've been interested in Ekdahl ever since, but not due to Armstrong's theories.

So, I've shared with you that the opportunity was there to do a quick search of two reference websites in reaction to my surprise at reading Walt's post, but actually searching for "Darryl Click" was prompted additionally by a letter I read the other day from Weissberg to Hal Verb, surprising me as to how deeply the suspicion of the name was embedded in the best informed of "the community," even four years later... and that Click even had a "nick," "Bo"!

BTW, this letter was a search result, using the search terms "city transportation" and Pott. I searched jfk.hood.edu using those search terms attempting to learn if Whaley's employer provided the d.o.b. they had on file for Whaley to the FBI or anyone else. I've assumed Whaley provided City Transportation with a drivers license and an application for a taxi driver permit and that sometime after his 1940 military draft board registration, he must have arranged for a change of the birth year on his drivers license from 1908 to 1905.

http://jfk.hood.edu/Collection/Weisberg%20Subject%20Index%20Files/V%20Disk/Verb%20Hal%201967/Item%2033.pdf


So perhaps I protest too much, my reply to you will be perceived as "all over the place". Put me down for my uncontested "sin". I believe Mrs. Roberts, Markham, and Davis were unreliable witnesses and Whaley was an attention seeking story teller with deep, personal issues.

A sample anecdote, if Mark Lane can be believed about this....

Quote
https://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/lane_m1.htm
Mark Lane...The affidavit is peculiarly sparse in reference to the description of the assailant, the man who killed Tippit, by an eyewitness who said she was just 50 feet away.
Her description of this person is found in two different portions of the affidavit--he was young, white, male, and that is the entire description present in the affidavit at that time.
I spoke with the deponent, the eyewitness, Helen Louise Markham, and Mrs. Markham told me Miss or Mrs, I didn't ask her if she was married--told me that she was a hundred feet away from the police car, not the 50 feet which appears in the affidavit. She gave to me a more detailed description of the man who she said shot Officer Tippit. She said he was short, a little on the heavy side, and his hair was somewhat bushy. I think it is fair to state that an accurate description of Oswald would be average height, quite slender, with thin and receding hair.
Helen Markham said to me that she was taken to the police station on that same day, that she was very upset, she of course had never seen anyone killed in front of her eyes before, and that in the police station she identified Oswald as the person who had shot Officer Tippit in the lineup, including three other persons. She said no one pointed Oswald out to her--she was just shown four people, and she picked Oswald.
She said--when I asked her how she could identify him--she indicated she was able to identify him because of his clothing, a gray jacket and dark trousers. And this was the basis for her identification--although Oswald physically does not meet the description which she indicated.
Representative FORD. When did you have this conversation with the deponent?
Mr. LANE. Within the last 5 days.
Representative FORD. Some time in late February 1964?
Mr. LANE. Or perhaps even early March, yes, sir....

JohnM, how many jackets did this lone nut have in his possession while fleeing E. Tenth? Enough so one could be found under a car, with another "at the ready," to be donned in a line up to assist the  "uneven" Helen Markham in making her identification?

« Last Edit: September 07, 2021, 02:02:19 AM by Tom Scully »

Offline Tom Scully

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2021, 01:46:27 AM »
Agent Bookhout's report (11/23, dictated 11/24, typed up 11/25) has Mr Oswald putting it at "approximately 85 cents"

I guess this has been ingrained in my subconscious, the alleged complaint about the nickel, "tip".

Quote
https://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/death7.htm
ATTACHMENT 20-2  DALLAS MORNING NEWS
DECEMBER 19, 1965

2-CAR SMASHUP KILLS OSWALD TAXI DRIVER
Dallas Man, 83, Also Dies in Crash on Trinity Viaduct
By James Ewell

...The fare was 95 cents.  Whaley later said, "If you can call a
nickel a tip, I guess he tipped me."
   A drizzling rain was falling when the cars collided Saturday.
Lt.Cmdr. Barnes, 32, is a fighter pilot who had come to Dallas for a
weekend of reserve training at Dallas Naval Air Station.
   Whaley was also a Navy reservist, attached to the air wing
staff at the Naval Air Station.  Barnes is attached to naval Reserve
Fighter Squadron 703 at the air station.
   Sheriff's deputies said identification cards found on the
injured man indicate that Barnes is an attorney...

Online Walt Cakebread

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2021, 03:32:48 AM »
Agent Bookhout's report (11/23, dictated 11/24, typed up 11/25) has Mr Oswald putting it at "approximately 85 cents"

Agent Bookhout's report (11/23, dictated 11/24, typed up 11/25) has Mr Oswald putting it at "approximately 85 cents"

C'mon Mr Ford ....You know that Lee wouldn't have told them that the fare was "APPROXIMATELY "85 cents....( Thomas Kelley recorded that Lee told Fritz the fare was 85 cents...Not APPROXIMATELY 85 cents. ) 

Surely you can see that Bookhout was attempting to make it look like Lee was lying, and he didn't know he exact fare.

This should reveal something for you....   Bookhout and Fritz were trying to cast doubt on Lee's account.....  and trying to prop up Whaley's tale.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2021, 03:49:07 PM by Walt Cakebread »

Online Walt Cakebread

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2021, 04:52:46 PM »
I guess this has been ingrained in my subconscious, the alleged complaint about the nickel, "tip".

Tom is there a better and more detailed account of the collision that killed Bill Whaley ?.....  Call me skeptical but I find it a little hard to believe that a very experienced driver like Whaley would die in a collision.    Was Whaley driving the taxi at the time and did he have a passenger?     I don't know why, but I immediately thought of General Patton's  death in a collision when I read about Whaley's death.

Online Walt Cakebread

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2021, 01:36:42 AM »
I guess this has been ingrained in my subconscious, the alleged complaint about the nickel, "tip".

Was Whaley driving his cab at the time of the collision?    Was the 83 year old man who also was killed,  his passenger? 
Who was at fault?

Online Richard Smith

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2021, 03:38:38 PM »
Tom is there a better and more detailed account of the collision that killed Bill Whaley ?.....  Call me skeptical but I find it a little hard to believe that a very experienced driver like Whaley would die in a collision.    Was Whaley driving the taxi at the time and did he have a passenger?     I don't know why, but I immediately thought of General Patton's  death in a collision when I read about Whaley's death.

Don't forget James Dean and Jayne Mansfield.  The fact that so many people, including famous people, have died in automobile accidents can only mean that Oswald was framed.  It's all coming together.

Online Walt Cakebread

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Re: What's the value of a dime?
« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2021, 10:09:33 PM »
Agent Bookhout's report (11/23, dictated 11/24, typed up 11/25) has Mr Oswald putting it at "approximately 85 cents"

On page  626 of the WR, is the report of Secret Service inspector Thomas Kelley who was present at a 11-23- interrogation session of Lee Oswald.  Kelly wrote:....   "In response to questions put by Captain Fritz, Oswald said that immediately after having left the building where he worked, he went by bus to the theater where he was arrested; that when he got on the bus he secured a transfer and thereafter transferred to other buses to get to his destination". ----------------------- Fritz asked him if he had ridden in a taxi that day, and Oswald then changed his story and said that when he got on the bus he found that it was going too slow and after two blocks he got off the bus and took a cab to his home; that he passed the time with the cab driver and that the cab driver had told him that the president was shot. He paid a cab fare of 85 cents.


after having left the building where he worked, he went by bus to the theater

He went by bus to the theater
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 10:12:13 PM by Walt Cakebread »

 

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