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Author Topic: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory  (Read 224825 times)

Offline Jack Trojan

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5110 on: April 01, 2020, 01:59:12 AM »
Trump banned travel from China in January and everyone called him a racist. He then banned travel from Europe in March and the Europeans said that was too extreme.

Then they all woke up and started banning travel from China and Europe started banning flights from one country to the next inside Europe.

No one called Drumpf a racist for banning travel from China or Europe. I don't think anyone even criticized him for it. That's all in his head. He's a racist because he called it the "Chinese Virus". He blames Xi Jinping for creating and releasing the virus to destroy the US economy so he would lose the election and Biden would end the trade war. That's the way this tin foil hat CT nutjob POTUS' mind works. His mentor is Alex Jones.

Online Tom Scully

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5111 on: April 01, 2020, 01:59:51 AM »
   :D What utter bias partisanship. Who told you this? Read instead of rant....
 https://thehill.com/homenews/media/485025-ap-fact-checkers-find-biden-bloomberg-paint-distorted-picture-on-trump-cdc
Or is The Hill "not independent" enough?What embarrasses me is finding myself reading the venomous crap that I find in this thread. 
And Plant---I don't need your sniveling "suggestions".
Hoping you will get what you deserve.

Trump banned travel from China in January and everyone called him a racist. He then banned travel from Europe in March and the Europeans said that was too extreme.

Then they all woke up and started banning travel from China and Europe started banning flights from one country to the next inside Europe.

Can either of you gentlemen explain your high opinion and defense of this President who refuses to take responsibility for his controversial and incendiary remarks? Is it inspiring to observe his constant self-promotion?

Quote
Trump greater than Lincoln? Republicans polled said yes in a party Lincoln wouldn’t recognize.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2019/12/03/republicans-prefer-trump-lincoln-poll-shows-todays-gop-couldnt-be-more-different/
Dec 5, 2019 - The first Republican president stressed humility, talked openly about his flaws and used language not to punish and humiliate but to inspire.

Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-conference/
Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Conference
Healthcare   Issued on: February 27, 2020

Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-conference-2/
Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Conference
Issued on: February 29, 2020
……


Q    Mr. President, if I could just ask you: You said the other day, in the Cabinet Room with African American leaders, you’ve got to get away from politics.  You were down in Charleston last night, using the word “hoax” when talking about Democrats.  Somebody now is dead from this.  Do you regret that kind of talk?
THE PRESIDENT:  No, no, no.  “Hoax” referring to the action that they take to try and pin this on somebody, because we’ve done such a good job.  The hoax is on them, not — I’m not talking about what’s happening here; I’m talking what they’re doing.  That’s the hoax.  That’s just a continuation of the hoax, whether it’s the impeachment hoax or the “Russia, Russia, Russia” hoax.  This is what I’m talking about.
Certainly not referring to this.  How could anybody refer to this?  This is very serious stuff.
But the way they refer to it — because these people have done such an incredible job, and I don’t like it when they are criticizing these people.  And that’s the hoax.  That’s what I’m talking about.

…….Q    Your campaign today sued the New York Times for an opinion piece.
THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah.
Q    Is it your opinion or is it your contention that if people have an opinion contrary to yours, that they should be sued?
THE PRESIDENT:  Well, when they get the opinion totally wrong, as the New York Times did — and, frankly, they’ve got a lot wrong over the last number of years.  So we’ll see how that — let that work its way through the courts.
Q    But that’s an opinion, right?
THE PRESIDENT:  No, no.  If you read it, you’ll see it’s beyond an opinion.  That’s not an opinion.  That’s something much more than an opinion.  They did a bad thing.  And there’ll be more coming.  There’ll be more coming.
Q    Mr. President, Tokyo will host Summer Olympic Games this July.  Do you expect Tokyo will be?
THE PRESIDENT:  I hope so, because Shinzo Abe is a very good friend of mine.  I love the people of Japan.  And I hope it’s going to be in good shape.
As you know, you have a number of people in Japan who have been infected.  I hear they’re doing a very professional job, which doesn’t surprise me at all, with Shinzo and with all of the people you have.  I know Japan very well.  I think they’re going to handle it very well.
It’s a little tight, you know.  It’s a little tight.  They spent billions of dollars building one of the most beautiful venues I’ve ever seen, and your Prime Minister is very proud of it.  I hope it’s going to be fine.  We hope it will.
Q    Thank you very much, Mr. President.  The doctor at CDC just talked about dusting off preparedness plans.  But coming from you, it has more weight.  Do you feel like U.S. schools should be preparing for a coronavirus spreading?
THE PRESIDENT:  I would think so, yes.  I mean, I haven’t spoken specifically about that with the various doctors, but I would think so, yes.
I think every aspect of our society should be prepared.  I don’t think it’s going to come to that, especially with the fact that we’re going down, not up.  We’re going very substantially down, not up.
But, yeah, I think schools should be preparing and, you know, get ready just in case.  The words are “just in case.”  We don’t think we’re going to be there.  We don’t think we’re going to be anywhere close.  And again, if you look at some countries, they are coming down.  It’s starting to go in the other direction.
This will end.  This will end.  You look at flu season.  I said 26,000 people?  I’ve never heard of a number like that.  Twenty-six thousand people going up to sixty-nine thousand people, Doctor — you told me before.  Sixty-nine thousand people die every year — from 26 [thousand] to 69 [thousand] — every year from the flu.  Now, think of that.  It’s incredible.
So far, the results of all of this that everybody is reading about — and part of the thing is you want to keep it the way it is.  You don’t want to see panic because there’s no reason to be panicked about it.
But when I mentioned the flu, I said — actually, I asked the various doctors.  I said, “Is this just like flu?”  Because people die from the flu.  And this is very unusual.  And it is a little bit different, but in some ways it’s easier and in some ways it’s a little bit tougher.
But we have it so well under control.  I mean, we really have done a very good job.
Go ahead.
Q    Thank you, Mr. President.  Thank you, Mr. President.  You mentioned the stock market earlier.  To go back to that: To be clear, the Dow Jones dropped more than 2,000 points this week.  Are you suggesting that that was overblown?  Are financial markets overreacting here?
THE PRESIDENT:  I think the financial markets are very upset when they look at the Democrat candidates standing on that stage making fools out of themselves.  And they say, “If we ever have a President like this…” — and there’s always a possibility.  It’s an election.  You know, who knows what happens, right?  I think we’re going to win.  I think we’re going to win by a lot.
But when they look at the statements made by the people standing — standing behind those podiums, I think that has a huge effect, yeah.
Q    You don’t think the sell-off had to do with the coronavirus (inaudible)?
THE PRESIDENT:  Oh, I think it did.  I think it did.  But I think you can add quite a bit of sell-off to what they’re seeing.  Because they’re seeing the potential.  You know, again, I think we’re going to win.  I feel very confident of it.  We’ve done everything, and much more than I said we were going to do.
You look at what we’ve done.  What we’ve done is incredible, with the tax cuts and regulation cuts and rebuilding our military, taking care of vets and getting them Choice and Accountability.  All of the things we’ve done — protecting our Second Amendment.  I mean, they view that — the Second Amendment, they — they’re going to destroy the Second Amendment.
When people look at that, they say, “This is not good.”  So you add that in.  I really believe that’s a factor.  But, no, this is — what we’re talking about is — is the virus.  That’s what we’re talking about.
But I do believe that’s — I do believe — in terms of CNBC and in terms of Fox Business, I do believe that that’s a factor.  Yeah.  And I think after I win the election, I think the stock market is going to boom like it’s never boomed before — just like it did, by the way, after I won the last election.  The stock market, the day after, went up like a rocket ship.
Q    At what point would you be considering loosen the travel restrictions regarding China?
THE PRESIDENT:  When we’re at a point where we don’t have a problem.  You know, we’re not going to loosen the travel restrictions.  That’s what saved us.
Had I not made — Mike alluded to it — had I not made a decision very early on not to take people from a certain area, we wouldn’t be talking this way.  We’d be talking about many more people would’ve been infected.
I took a lot of heat.  I mean, some people called me racist because I made a decision so early.  And we had never done that as a country before, let alone early.  So it was a, you know, bold decision.  It turned out to be a good decision.
But I was criticized by the Democrats.  They called me a racist because I made that decision, if you can believe that one.
We have to all work together.  We can’t say bad things, and especially when we have the best team anywhere in the world.  And we really gave it an early start.  We gave it a very early start.
Q    Your budgets have consistently called for enormous cuts to the CDC, the NIH, and the WHO.  You’ve talked a lot today about how these professionals are excellent, have been critical and necessary.  Does this experience at all give you pause about those consistent cuts?
THE PRESIDENT:  No, because we — we can get money and we can increase staff.  We know all the people.  We know all the good people.  It’s a question I asked the doctors before.  Some of the people we cut, they haven’t been used for many, many years.  And if — if we have a need, we can get them very quickly.
And rather than spending the money — and I’m a business person — I don’t like having thousands of people around when you don’t need them.  When we need them, we can get them back very quickly.  For instance, we’re bringing some people in tomorrow that are already in this, you know, great government that we have, and very specifically for this.
We can build up very, very quickly.  And we’ve already done that.  I mean, we really have built up.


……..
Yeah.  Go ahead, please.  Go ahead, please.
Q    Thank you, Mr. President.
THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah, go ahead.
Q    So far — so far, your administration —
THE PRESIDENT:  I picked him, but you’re fine.
Q    So far, your administration is only testing less than 500 people.  And health officials are questioning whether that’s enough, comparing to other countries who have tested more than tens of thousands of people.  Are you planning to test more people?
THE PRESIDENT:  Well, we’re testing everybody that we need to test.  And we’re finding very little problem.  Very little problem.
Now, you treat this like a flu. 
We were — in fact, I might ask one of the doctors to come up and explain it.  You want to wash your hands a lot.  You want to stay — if you’re not feeling well, if you feel you have a flu, stay inside, sort of quarantine yourself.  Don’t go outside.
But there are certain steps that you can take that won’t even be necessary.  You know, in many cases, when you catch this, it’s very light; you don’t even know there’s a problem.  Sometimes they just get the sniffles, sometimes they just get something where they’re not feeling quite right.  And sometimes they feel really bad.
But that’s a little bit like the flu.  It’s a little like the regular flu that we have flu shots for.  And we’ll essentially have a flu shot for this in a fairly quick manner.
Yeah, go ahead.
Q    Two weeks ago, Mr. President, your Acting OMB Director was in this room and was talking about what he expects to be GDP growth for this coming year.  He said it was 3 percent.  And we’ve talked about the effects of the coronavirus on the supply chain, the declines in the financial markets.  Are you still confident that you’ll see that kind of economic growth this year?
THE PRESIDENT:  No, we’re going to have tremendously low unemployment.  We’re setting records on that one.  In fact, the administration has the — as you know, the lowest average unemployment of any administration in history.  Our numbers are very low, very good — 3.5, 3.6.  But you can’t really see what this does in terms of GDP.
It could affect it, but that’s irrelevant compared to what we’re talking about.  We want to make sure it’s safe.  Safety, number one.
But this would have, you know, an impact on GDP.  But we’re still very, very — we’re doing great.  But this will — just like — I’ll tell you what has a big impact: Boeing has a big impact.  How did that happen?  A year ago, all of a sudden, that happened.  I think that took away a half a point to a point, even.  You know, it’s a massive company.  I think Boeing — we had the General Motors strike; that was a big impact on GDP.
And, of course, we’re paying interest rates.  I disagree with the head of the Fed.  I’m not — I’m not happy with what that is because he’s kept interest rates.
President Obama didn’t have near the numbers.  And yet, if you look at what happened, he was paying zero.  We’re paying interest.  Now, it’s more conservative.  And, frankly, people that put their money away are now getting a return on their money as opposed to not getting anything.
But I think, you know, we’re the — we’re the greatest of them all.  We should be paying the lowest interest rates.  And when Germany and other countries are paying negative rates — meaning, they’re literally getting paid when they put out money.  I mean, they — they borrow money and they get paid when it gets paid back.  Who ever heard of this before?  It’s a first.  But we don’t do that.
So I totally disagree with our Fed.  I think our Fed has made a terrible mistake, and it would’ve made a big difference, as good as we’ve done, even without the 2,000 points.  And we started off at 16,000, and we’ll be at 28,000 without.  We were going to crack 30,000.  We have had increases like nobody has seen before.  But we’re doing well.
But we have to watch — we’re doing well, anyway, in other words, even despite the 2,000 points.  It sounds like a lot, and it’s a lot.  But it’s noth- — it’s very little compared to what we’ve gone up.
But we’ll be watching it very closely.  But we have been hurt by General Motors.  We’ve been hurt by Boeing.  And we’ve been hurt by — we’ve been hurt, in my opinion, very badly, by our own Federal Reserve, who has also created a very strong dollar.  That’s something nice about a strong dollar, but it makes it much harder to do business outside of this country.
Q    Thank you, sir.  A number of your supporters online have embraced these theories reported — these theories that the CDC may be exaggerating the threat of coronavirus to hurt you politically.  Rush Limbaugh the other day said this has been advanced to weaponize the virus against you.
THE PRESIDENT:  You don’t mean my supporters.  You mean my — my people that are not supporters?
Q    Right.  Your opponents.
THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah, I agree with that.  I do.
Q    Have you seen evidence of that?
THE PRESIDENT:  I think they are.  I think — and I’d like it to stop.  I think people know that when Chuck Schumer gets upset — I mean, he did the same thing with a couple of trade deals that are phenomenal deals now — everybody has acknowledged they’re phenomenal deals — before he ever saw the deal.  He didn’t even know we were going to make a deal.  They said, “What do you think of the deal with China?”  “I don’t like it.  I don’t like it.”
He talked about tariffs.  I left the tariffs on: 25 percent on $250 billion.  He said, “He took the tariffs off.”  He didn’t even know the deal.  And he was out there knocking it because that’s a natural thing to say.  But when you’re talking about especially something like this, we have to be on the same team.  This is too important.  We have to be on the same team.


EXCERPTED FROM NY TIMES - bottom quote box in this post....: Back on February 27, as Criminal Forensic psychiatrist, Bandy X Lee describes Trump's "communicating" he answered from the unconcious, not yet realizing his cumulative damage to DHS and NSC would result in the greatest health emergency and economic losses in the history of the U.S."

Quote
..... Getting the Trump Team’s Attention

......John F. Kelly and Rex W. Tillerson were part of a high-level pandemic exercise, but both men left the administration before the Covid-19 outbreak.Credit...Al Drago for The New York Times
After Mr. Trump’s election, Ms. Monaco arranged an extensive exercise for high-level incoming officials — including Rex W. Tillerson, the nominee for secretary of state; John F. Kelly, designated to become homeland security secretary; and Rick Perry, who would become energy secretary — gaming out the response to a deadly flu outbreak.

She asked Tom Bossert, who was preparing to come in as Mr. Trump’s homeland security adviser, to run the event alongside her.

“We modeled a new strain of flu in the exercise precisely because it’s so communicable,” Ms. Monaco said. “There is no vaccine, and you would get issues like nursing homes being particularly vulnerable, shortages of ventilators.”

Ms. Monaco was impressed by how seriously Mr. Bossert, her successor, appeared to take the threat, as did many of the 30 or so Trump team members who participated in the exercise, details of which were reported by Politico.


But by the time the current crisis hit, almost all of the leaders at the table — Mr. Tillerson, Mr. Kelly and Mr. Perry among them — had been fired or moved on.

In 2018, Mr. Trump’s national security adviser at the time, John R. Bolton, ousted Mr. Bossert and eliminated the National Security Council directorate, folding it into an office dedicated to weapons of mass destruction in what Trump officials called a logical consolidation.

Asked about that shift on March 13, Mr. Trump told a reporter that it was “a nasty question,” before adding: “I don’t know anything about it.” Writing on Twitter the next day, Mr. Bolton lashed out at critics who said the shift had reflected disregard for pandemic threats.

“Claims that streamlining NSC structures impaired our nation’s bio defense are false,” Mr. Bolton tweeted. “Global health remained a top NSC priority.”

In a statement, the National Security Council said it “has directors and staff whose full-time job it is to monitor, plan for, and respond to pandemics, including an infectious disease epidemiologist and a virologist.”

But in testimony to Congress last week, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, suggested that ending the stand-alone directorate was ill-advised. “It would be nice if the office was still there,” he said.

On Feb. 10, nearly three weeks after the first coronavirus case was diagnosed in the United States, Mr. Trump submitted a 2021 budget proposal that called for a $693.3 million reduction in funding for the C.D.C., or about 9 percent, although there was a modest increase for the division that combats global pandemics.

......
Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-conference-3/
Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Conference
 HEALTHCARE
Issued on: March 13, 2020
.....
Q    Thank you, Mr. President.  Yamiche Alcindor from PBS NewsHour.

THE PRESIDENT:  Yes.

Q    My first question is: You said that you don’t take responsibility, but you did disband the White House pandemic office, and the officials that were working in that office left this administration abruptly.  So what responsibility do you take to that?  And the officials that worked in that office said that you — that the White House lost valuable time because that office was disbanded.  What do you make of that?

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I just think it’s a nasty question because what we’ve done is — and Tony has said numerous times that we’ve saved thousands of lives because of the quick closing.  And when you say “me,” I didn’t do it.  We have a group of people I could —

Q    It’s your administration.

THE PRESIDENT:  I could ask perhaps — my administration — but I could perhaps ask Tony about that because I don’t know anything about it.  I mean, you say — you say we did that.  I don’t know anything about it.

Q    You don’t know about the —

THE PRESIDENT:  We’re spending — I don’t know.  It’s the —

Q    — about the reorganization that happened at the National Security Council?

THE PRESIDENT:  It’s the — it’s the administration.  Perhaps they do that.  You know, people let people go.  You used to be with a different newspaper than you are now.  You know, things like that happen.

Q    But this was a — this was an org- —

THE PRESIDENT:  Okay.  Please go ahead.

Q    This was an organization at the National Security Council.

THE PRESIDENT:  We’re doing a great job.  Let me tell you, these professionals behind me and the — these great, incredible doctors and business people — the best in the world.  And I can say that.  Whether it’s retailers or labs, or anything you want to say, these are the best of the world.  We’re doing a great job.

We have 40 people right now.  Forty.  Compare that with other countries that have many, many times that amount.  And one of the reasons we have 40 and others have — and, again, that number is going up, just so you understand.  And a number of cases, which are very small, relatively speaking — it’s going up.  But we’ve done a great job because we acted quickly.  We acted early.  And there’s nothing we could have done that was better than closing our borders to highly infected areas.
.....

He remembered the cuts last month, but today, (above) he claimed he was unfamiliar with the question. A sign of dementia, dishonesty, or both?

He claimed he'a business person, doesn't want to spend money unnecessarily on staff.... Even at the cost of weakening national security, really?

Quote
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-golf-mar-a-lago-taxpayers_n_5e4712b9c5b64d860fcab86c
POLITICS 02/14/2020 07:15 pm ET Updated Feb 17, 2020
Trump’s 29th Trip To Mar-a-Lago Brings Golf Tab To 334 Years Of Presidential Salary
The president often brags about not taking a paycheck, but his golf hobby has now cost taxpayers $133.8 million.
headshot
By S.V. Date

https://twitter.com/BandyXLee1/status/1241080932192452609


Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-conference/
Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Conference
 HEALTHCARE

  Issued on: February 27, 2020

....Q    Your budgets have consistently called for enormous cuts to the CDC, the NIH, and the WHO.  You’ve talked a lot today about how these professionals are excellent, have been critical and necessary.  Does this experience at all give you pause about those consistent cuts?

https://twitter.com/BandyXLee1/status/1241122757087309826


THE PRESIDENT:  No, because we — we can get money and we can increase staff.  We know all the people.  We know all the good people.  It’s a question I asked the doctors before.  Some of the people we cut, they haven’t been used for many, many years.  And if — if we have a need, we can get them very quickly.

And rather than spending the money — and I’m a business person — I don’t like having thousands of people around when you don’t need them.  When we need them, we can get them back very quickly.  For instance, we’re bringing some people in tomorrow that are already in this, you know, great government that we have, and very specifically for this.

We can build up very, very quickly.  And we’ve already done that.  I mean, we really have built up.
We have a great staff. And using Mike, I’m doing that because he’s in the administration and he’s very good at doing what he does, and doing as it relates to this....

Quote
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/03/peter-wehner-trump-presidency-over/607969/
The Trump Presidency Is Over
It has taken a good deal longer than it should have, but Americans have now seen the con man behind the curtain.

10:59 AM ET Peter Wehner
Contributing writer at The Atlantic and senior fellow at EPPC

Lock him up! (T'was the constant upheaval caused by Stephen Miller whispering in Trump's ear about Homeland Security not being sufficiently racist that "took the eye off the ball"!)

Quote
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/us/politics/trump-coronavirus-outbreak.html
Before Virus Outbreak, a Cascade of Warnings Went Unheeded
Government exercises, including one last year, made clear that the U.S. was not ready for a pandemic like the coronavirus. But little was done.

By David E. Sanger, Eric Lipton, Eileen Sullivan and Michael Crowley
Published March 19, 2020
Updated March 22, 2020

WASHINGTON — The outbreak of the respiratory virus began in China and was quickly spread around the world by air travelers, who ran high fevers. In the United States, it was first detected in Chicago, and 47 days later, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic. By then it was too late: 110 million Americans were expected to become ill, leading to 7.7 million hospitalized and 586,000 dead.

That scenario, code-named “Crimson Contagion” and imagining an influenza pandemic, was simulated by the Trump administration’s Department of Health and Human Services in a series of exercises that ran from last January to August.

The simulation’s sobering results — contained in a draft report dated October 2019 that has not previously been reported — drove home just how underfunded, underprepared and uncoordinated the federal government would be for a life-or-death battle with a virus for which no treatment existed.

The draft report, marked “not to be disclosed,” laid out in stark detail repeated cases of “confusion” in the exercise. Federal agencies jockeyed over who was in charge. State officials and hospitals struggled to figure out what kind of equipment was stockpiled or available. Cities and states went their own ways on school closings.....
.....
......On the plus side, the Obama White House had created an Ebola Task Force, run by Ron Klain, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s former chief of staff, before a single case emerged in the United States. Congress allocated $5.4 billion in emergency funding to pay for Ebola treatment and prevention efforts in the United States and West Africa.

The money helped fund a little-known agency inside the Department of Health and Human Services in charge of preparing for future contagious disease outbreaks, the same office that in 2019 ran the Crimson Contagion exercise and other similar events in the years since.

After a man named Thomas Duncan, a Liberian citizen, became the first person given a diagnosis of Ebola on American territory in September 2014, errors resulted in the infection of two nurses and fear of a wider spread in the United States. (Mr. Duncan died, but the two nurses recovered.)

What is striking in reading Mr. Kirchhoff’s account today, however, is how few of the major faults he found in the American response resulted in action — even though the report was filled with department-by-department recommendations.

There were deficiencies “in personal protective equipment use, disinfection” and “social services for those placed under quarantine.”

There was confusion over travel restrictions, and the need “for a smoother sliding scale of escalation of government response, from local authorities acting on their own to local authorities acting with some federal assistance” to the full activation of the federal government.

The report concluded that “a minimum planning benchmark might be an epidemic an order of magnitude or two more difficult than that presented by the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, with much more significant domestic spread.”

But one big change did come out of the study: The creation of a dedicated office at the National Security Council to coordinate responses and raise the alarm early.

“What I learned most is that we had to stand up a global biosecurity and health directorate, and get it enshrined for the next administration,” said Lisa Monaco, Mr. Obama’s homeland security adviser.

Getting the Trump Team’s Attention


......John F. Kelly and Rex W. Tillerson were part of a high-level pandemic exercise, but both men left the administration before the Covid-19 outbreak.Credit...Al Drago for The New York Times
After Mr. Trump’s election, Ms. Monaco arranged an extensive exercise for high-level incoming officials — including Rex W. Tillerson, the nominee for secretary of state; John F. Kelly, designated to become homeland security secretary; and Rick Perry, who would become energy secretary — gaming out the response to a deadly flu outbreak.

She asked Tom Bossert, who was preparing to come in as Mr. Trump’s homeland security adviser, to run the event alongside her.

“We modeled a new strain of flu in the exercise precisely because it’s so communicable,” Ms. Monaco said. “There is no vaccine, and you would get issues like nursing homes being particularly vulnerable, shortages of ventilators.”

Ms. Monaco was impressed by how seriously Mr. Bossert, her successor, appeared to take the threat, as did many of the 30 or so Trump team members who participated in the exercise, details of which were reported by Politico.


But by the time the current crisis hit, almost all of the leaders at the table — Mr. Tillerson, Mr. Kelly and Mr. Perry among them — had been fired or moved on.

In 2018, Mr. Trump’s national security adviser at the time, John R. Bolton, ousted Mr. Bossert and eliminated the National Security Council directorate, folding it into an office dedicated to weapons of mass destruction in what Trump officials called a logical consolidation.

Asked about that shift on March 13, Mr. Trump told a reporter that it was “a nasty question,” before adding: “I don’t know anything about it.” Writing on Twitter the next day, Mr. Bolton lashed out at critics who said the shift had reflected disregard for pandemic threats.

“Claims that streamlining NSC structures impaired our nation’s bio defense are false,” Mr. Bolton tweeted. “Global health remained a top NSC priority.”

In a statement, the National Security Council said it “has directors and staff whose full-time job it is to monitor, plan for, and respond to pandemics, including an infectious disease epidemiologist and a virologist.”

But in testimony to Congress last week, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, suggested that ending the stand-alone directorate was ill-advised. “It would be nice if the office was still there,” he said.

On Feb. 10, nearly three weeks after the first coronavirus case was diagnosed in the United States, Mr. Trump submitted a 2021 budget proposal that called for a $693.3 million reduction in funding for the C.D.C., or about 9 percent, although there was a modest increase for the division that combats global pandemics.
‘Crimson Contagion’

The Crimson Contagion planning exercise run last year by the Department of Health and Human Services involved officials from 12 states and at least a dozen federal agencies. They included the Pentagon, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Security Council. Groups like the American Red Cross and American Nurses Association were invited to join, as were health insurance companies and major hospitals like the Mayo Clinic.

The war game-like exercise was overseen by Robert P. Kadlec, a former Air Force physician who has spent decades focused on biodefense issues. After stints on the Bush administration’s Homeland Security Council and the staff of the Senate Intelligence Committee, he was appointed assistant secretary of Health and Human Services for Preparedness and Response.

“He recognized early that we have a big problem and we needed much bigger budgets to prepare,” said Richard Danzig, the secretary of the Navy in the Clinton administration, who had worked with Mr. Kadlec.

The exercise played out in four separate stages, starting in January 2019.

The events were supposedly unspooling in real time — with the worst-case scenario underway as of Aug. 13, 2019 — when, according to the script, 12,100 cases had already been reported in the United States, with the largest number in Chicago, which had 1,400.

The fictional outbreak involved a pandemic flu, which the Department of Health and Human Services says was “very different than the novel coronavirus.” The staged outbreak had started when a group of 35 tourists visiting China were infected and then flew home to Australia, Kuwait, Malaysia, Thailand, Britain and Spain, as well as to the United States, with some developing respiratory symptoms and fevers en route.

A 52-year-old man from Chicago, who was on the tour, had “low energy and a dry cough” upon his return home. His 17-year-old son on that same day went out to a large public event in Chicago, and the chain of illnesses in the United States started.

Many of the moments during the tabletop exercise are now chillingly familiar.

In the fictional pandemic, as the virus spread quickly across the United States, the C.D.C. issued guidelines for social distancing, and many employees were told to work from home.

But federal and state officials struggled to identify which employees were essential and what equipment was needed to effectively work from home.

There also was confusion over how to handle school children. The C.D.C. recommended that states delay school openings — the exercise took place toward the end of the summer. But some school districts decided to go ahead with the start of school while others followed the federal advice, causing the same types of confusion and discrepancies that have marked the response to the coronavirus.

The exercise from last year then went on to predict how the situation on the ground in the United States would worsen as the weeks passed.

Confusion emerged as state governments began to turn in large numbers to Washington for help to address shortages of antiviral medications, personal protective equipment and ventilators. Then states started to submit requests to different branches of the federal government, leading to bureaucratic chaos.

Friction also emerged between the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is traditionally in charge of disaster response, and the Department of Health and Human Services, another scenario playing out now.

But the problems were larger than bureaucratic snags. The United States, the organizers realized, did not have the means to quickly manufacture more essential medical equipment, supplies or medicines, including antiviral medications, needles, syringes, N95 respirators and ventilators, the agency concluded.

Congress was briefed in December on some of these findings, including the inability to quickly replenish certain medical supplies, given that much of the product comes from overseas.

These concerns turned more urgent at a hearing last Thursday on Capitol Hill, as lawmakers peppered officials with the Department of Health and Human Services with questions that sounded almost as if they had read the script from the fictional exercise, reflecting the shortage of respirators and protective gear.

Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, said last week that he blamed Congress and prior administrations for not increasing stockpiles of this type of equipment.

“That is an area we ought to consider making an investment in,” he added, making a point, apparently unknown to him, that the administration’s own simulation had made clear five months earlier.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 02:45:08 AM by Tom Scully »

Online Tom Scully

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5112 on: April 01, 2020, 02:00:26 AM »
   :D What utter bias partisanship. Who told you this? Read instead of rant....
 https://thehill.com/homenews/media/485025-ap-fact-checkers-find-biden-bloomberg-paint-distorted-picture-on-trump-cdc
Or is The Hill "not independent" enough?What embarrasses me is finding myself reading the venomous crap that I find in this thread. 
And Plant---I don't need your sniveling "suggestions".
Hoping you will get what you deserve.

Trump banned travel from China in January and everyone called him a racist. He then banned travel from Europe in March and the Europeans said that was too extreme.

Then they all woke up and started banning travel from China and Europe started banning flights from one country to the next inside Europe.

Quote
https://www.politico.com/news/2020/03/25/trump-coronavirus-national-security-council-149285
White House
Trump team failed to follow NSC’s pandemic playbook
The 69-page document, finished in 2016, provided a step by step list of priorities – which were then ignored by the administration.
By DAN DIAMOND and NAHAL TOOSI
03/25/2020 08:00 PM EDT

The Trump administration, state officials and even individual hospital workers are now racing against each other to get the necessary masks, gloves and other safety equipment to fight coronavirus — a scramble that hospitals and doctors say has come too late and left them at risk. But according to a previously unrevealed White House playbook, the government should’ve begun a federal-wide effort to procure that personal protective equipment at least two months ago.
“Is there sufficient personal protective equipment for healthcare workers who are providing medical care?” the playbook instructs its readers, as one early decision that officials should address when facing a potential pandemic. “If YES: What are the triggers to signal exhaustion of supplies? Are additional supplies available? If NO: Should the Strategic National Stockpile release PPE to states?”

The strategies are among hundreds of tactics and key policy decisions laid out in a 69-page National Security Council playbook on fighting pandemics, which POLITICO is detailing for the first time. Other recommendations include that the government move swiftly to fully detect potential outbreaks, secure supplemental funding and consider invoking the Defense Production Act — all steps in which the Trump administration lagged behind the timeline laid out in the playbook.

“Each section of this playbook includes specific questions that should be asked and decisions that should be made at multiple levels” within the national security apparatus, the playbook urges, repeatedly advising officials to question the numbers on viral spread, ensure appropriate diagnostic capacity and check on the U.S. stockpile of emergency resources.


The playbook also stresses the significant responsibility facing the White House to contain risks of potential pandemics, a stark contrast with the Trump administration’s delays in deploying an all-of-government response and President Donald Trump's recent signals that he might roll back public health recommendations.



……..

Quote
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-testing-specialrep-idUSKBN2153BW
World News March 18, 2020 / 2:13 PM / 13 days ago
Special Report: How Korea trounced U.S. in race to test people for coronavirus
Chad Terhune, Dan Levine, Hyunjoo Jin, Jane Lanhee Lee
20 Min Read
SEOUL - In late January, South Korean health officials summoned representatives from more than 20 medical companies from their lunar New Year celebrations to a conference room tucked inside Seoul’s busy train station.
One of the country’s top infectious disease officials delivered an urgent message: South Korea needed an effective test immediately to detect the novel coronavirus, then running rampant in China. He promised the companies swift regulatory approval.
Though there were only four known cases in South Korea at that point, “we were very nervous. We believed that it could develop into a pandemic,” one attendee, Lee Sang-won, an infectious diseases expert at the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told Reuters.
“We acted like an army,” he said.
A week after the Jan. 27 meeting, South Korea’s CDC approved one company’s diagnostic test. Another company soon followed. By the end of February, South Korea was making headlines around the world for its drive-through screening centers and ability to test thousands of people daily.
South Korea’s swift action stands in stark contrast to what has transpired in the United States. Seven weeks after the train station meeting, the Koreans have tested well over 290,000 people and identified over 8,000 infections. New cases are falling off: Ninety-three were reported Wednesday, down from a daily peak of 909 two weeks earlier.
The United States, whose first case was detected the same day as South Korea’s, is not even close to meeting demand for testing. About 60,000 tests have been run by public and private labs in a country of 330 million, federal officials said Tuesday.
As a result, U.S. officials don’t fully grasp how many Americans have been infected and where they are concentrated - crucial to containment efforts. While more than 7,000 U.S. cases had been identified as of Wednesday, as many as 96 million people could be infected in coming months, and 480,000 could die, according to a projection prepared for the American Hospital Association by Dr. James Lawler, an infectious disease expert at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
“You cannot fight what you cannot see,” said Roger Klein, a former laboratory medical director at the Cleveland Clinic and previously an adviser to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on clinical laboratory issues.
How the United States fell so far behind South Korea, according to infectious disease experts, clinicians and state and local officials, is a tale of many contrasts in the two nations’ public health systems: a streamlined bureaucracy versus a congested one, bold versus cautious leadership, and a sense of urgency versus a reliance on protocol.
The delayed and chaotic testing in the United States will cost lives, potentially including those of doctors and nurses, many medical experts predict. Already more than 100 people have died overall, and fears of rampant spread have led to extraordinary restrictions on social interaction, upending the U.S. economy, schools, hospitals and everyday life.
“It makes me feel like I’m living in a farce,” said Dr. Ritu Thamman, a cardiologist and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Even hospital staff who may have been exposed can’t get a test, she said. “We are a rich country but we don’t have these kinds of things?”
The administration of President Donald Trump was tripped up by government rules and conventions, former officials and public health experts say. Instead of drafting the private sector early on to develop tests, as South Korea did, U.S. health officials relied, as is customary, on test kits prepared by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some of which proved faulty. Then, sticking to its time-consuming vetting procedures, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration didn’t approve tests other than the CDC’s until Feb. 29, more than five weeks after discussions with outside labs had begun.
Meanwhile, in the absence of enough kits, the CDC insisted for weeks on narrow criteria for testing, recommending it only when a person had recently been to China or other hot spots or had contact with someone known to be infected. As a result, the federal government failed to screen an untold number of Americans and missed opportunities to contain the spread, clinicians and public health experts say.
South Korea took a risk, releasing briskly vetted tests, then circling back later to spot check their effectiveness. By contrast, the United States’ FDA said it wanted to ensure, upfront, that the tests were accurate before they went out to millions of Americans.
“There are always opportunities to learn from situations like this one,” FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn, who has been on the job only three months, told Reuters. “But one thing I will stand firm on: We cannot compromise on the quality of the tests because what would be worse than no tests at all is wildly inaccurate test results.”

In a statement, CDC spokesman Benjamin Haynes said, “This process has not gone as smoothly as we would have liked.” But he said “more and more state labs have come online, increasing our public health system’s ability to detect and respond to cases.”
Bombarded by criticism amid a re-election campaign, Trump vowed on Friday to ramp up production of test kits in partnership with private companies and to make the diagnostic tests more widely available at hospitals and in-store parking lots. This week, the FDA said more than 35 universities, hospitals and lab companies had begun running their own tests, under the agency’s revised policy.
But it may be weeks before enough tests are on hand to fill the need.
“The idea of anybody getting (tested) easily the way people in other countries are doing it, we’re not set up for that,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases told a House committee last week. “That is a failing. Let’s admit it.”
It’s a problem many Americans, accustomed to hearing they have the most advanced medical care in the world, find hard to fathom.
“I don’t know how we messed this up so badly,” said Ruth Blodgett, 65, whose husband of the same age couldn’t get a coronavirus test on Saturday in an urgent care clinic outside Rochester, New York, even though he was coughing and the doctor ordered one for him. “We got caught flat-footed. For America, that’s unacceptable.”

‘HURRY UP AND DEVELOP THE KITS’
At the pivotal Jan. 27 meeting at the Seoul train station, South Korean government leaders told companies they were cleared for takeoff.
“They were told that the ‘emergency use authorization’ would be coming, so hurry up and develop the kits,” said Lee Hyukmin, head of the coronavirus task force at the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine, who was at the meeting.
One of the companies was Kogene Biotech Co Ltd, whose test kit was the only one to work initially. The government announced its approval on Feb. 4.
“The government acted quickly,” said Myoah Baek, an executive director at Kogene. The Korean CDC “disclosed information on test methods so test kit makers were able to speed up development.”
Lee Hyukmin of the Korean laboratory society said the government was swift - but not reckless.
“Of course, a kit that’s approved in one week isn’t as good as one that goes through a year of clinical trials,” he said. So in the early days, Lee said, the government cross-checked cases to ensure the tests were working properly.
Cross-checking involved verifying that labs got the same result the government did on an initial pool of patient samples. As of last week, nearly 100 labs were available to perform tests nationwide, according to government figures.
South Korea’s rapid response to the new coronavirus resulted from scars of the past.
In the aftermath of the 2015 outbreak of MERS, short for the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, critics slammed then-President Park Geun-hye and her administration for a slow response and a lack of transparency. Public confidence waned in Park, who was impeached in 2017 following an unrelated corruption scandal.

The country had 186 MERS cases, more than anywhere outside the Middle East, including 38 deaths.
“We can’t ever forget the incident. It is engraved in our mind,” the Korean CDC’s Lee Sang-won said. “We were hurt so much, and we felt remorseful.”
‘A REAL FOUL UP’
On Jan. 31, only days after the Seoul train station meeting, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) declared the novel coronavirus a public health emergency, citing a similar pronouncement from the World Health Organization.
HHS oversees the separate operations of the FDA and CDC, key agencies involved in responding to the pandemic. The CDC was responsible for developing the initial test kits for the virus. Then, under longstanding protocols, the FDA needed to approve the test before it could be sent to state and local labs around the country. Private labs and large hospitals could develop their own tests or work off the CDC version.
On Feb. 3, amid the preparations to address the emergency, the FDA hosted an all-day conference at its headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland, which had been scheduled well before the outbreak. Regulators, researchers and industry representatives gathered to discuss the general process for putting diagnostic tests cleared under emergencies on the path to permanent approval by the FDA.
Though coronavirus was now the hottest topic in global medicine, a broadcast of the meeting conveyed little sense of urgency about the epidemic sweeping the globe. It was mentioned in passing but regulators mostly stuck to their Powerpoint presentations.
In his remarks, Dr. Timothy Stenzel, who oversees the FDA’s review of diagnostic tests, spoke broadly about the agency’s mission to protect public health: “It’s our goal to be first in the world wherever possible to authorize new tests.”
Carolyn Hiller, a program director at the Medical Device Innovation Consortium, which hosted the event alongside FDA, said there were discussions with the agency about postponing the meeting because of the coronavirus outbreak, but both sides opted to go ahead.
“The whole coronavirus thing blew up in real time while this was happening,” she said.
Stenzel did not respond to a request for comment. In a statement, the FDA acknowledged that the coronavirus was not a “specific topic on the agenda.” But it said the agency already was talking to test developers and “the conference was timely and addressed issues important” to firms and institutions looking to produce a test.
The following day, Feb. 4, the FDA greenlighted a CDC test kit for the virus.
Weeks of chaos would follow.
By Feb. 8, some states and other public labs were complaining that the CDC’s test wasn’t working because of a flawed component that gave inconclusive results. Three days later, the CDC told the labs that it was manufacturing a new component.
As of mid-February, the federal government remained stuck in first gear. The CDC was the primary supplier of tests across much of the country, and other labs couldn’t immediately deploy their own without the FDA’s blessing.
HHS said it has assigned a team of outside scientists to examine what went wrong with the CDC’s initial batch of tests, such as whether there was a manufacturing defect, flawed design or contamination in the agency’s lab. The precise problem has not been identified.
The CDC didn’t send out new test kits until late February. Meanwhile, public health experts say, a crucial window was closing on containing the virus, which by then was known to have infected more than 60 people.

The U.S. emergency declaration issued in late January created additional hurdles that hindered a wider expansion in testing, according to former federal officials and lab professionals.
The declaration eased the way for drugmakers to pursue vaccines and antiviral treatments for COVID-19. But public health experts said that the same declaration made it harder to expand diagnostic testing outside the CDC.
That’s because the declaration required diagnostic tests developed by individual labs, such as those at hospitals or universities, to undergo greater scrutiny than in non-emergencies - presumably because the stakes are higher.
“Paradoxically, it increased regulations on diagnostics while it created an easier pathway for vaccines and antivirals,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security. “There was a real foul-up with diagnostic tests that has exposed a flaw in the United States’ pandemic response plan.”
Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said the CDC and FDA stuck to their conventional playbook for too long.
“Traditional public health thinking is,’Don’t create widespread panic and don’t go over the top. Keep the testing narrow in a precision rifle approach rather than a mass, shotgun approach,’” Schaffner said. “That failed in this instance. This virus acted differently and it overwhelmed the U.S. system. South Korea had a much better sense of what was happening.”
In a statement Tuesday, the CDC said: “After finding out that some labs could not fully verify the test, CDC began working on a solution and identifying the source of the problem …. CDC, in conjunction with FDA, determined how to move forward and shared this information immediately with public health labs.”
The CDC statement also suggested that the agency was not exclusively responsible for testing delays.
The CDC was “not an impediment” to getting large-scale commercial testing started, according to the statement. That was the role of the FDA, and as the initial U.S. cases were being detected in late January and early February, CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield highlighted the need for that agency to act, according to the CDC statement.
Alberto Gutierrez, who led the FDA’s office overseeing diagnostic testing from 2009 to 2017, said the agency proceeded with caution because it saw itself as the last line of defense against opportunistic companies looking to cash in on threats to public health. “There is money to be made in an emergency, and a lot of people try to take advantage of that,” Gutierrez said. “The problem the FDA faces is, do you let it become the Wild West?”

“The FDA had good intentions,” he said.
RAMPING UP
As U.S. efforts faltered, South Korean officials cleared a test from a second company, Seegene Inc, on Feb. 12.
With many more tests in hand, health officials were well armed to attack a fast-moving virus and aggressively track down people who may have been exposed. This testing-backed offensive helped South Korea reduce the number of new cases over a matter of weeks, serving as a model for other countries grappling with the pandemic.
In mid-February, cases spiked at a secretive church in the southeastern city of Daegu. On Feb. 26, Daegu city officials said they would test every single member of the church, including those without symptoms.
As of March 10, Daegu said that it had tested almost all of the 10,000 members of the church in that area, and about 40% came back positive. The city, which now accounts for about three-quarters of total infections in South Korea, has seen new cases sharply drop. On Wednesday, officials announced 46 new cases compared to a peak of 741 cases on Feb. 29.
The country went from two approved test makers on Feb. 18 to five as of last week, according to the Korean CDC.

“To my surprise, test kit makers were able to boost production quickly,” Korean CDC’s Lee Sang-won said.

PLEADING WITH WASHINGTON
By Feb. 24, state and local labs in the United States were pleading with the FDA to relax its rules so the nation no longer had to rely so heavily on the CDC for testing. They asked Hahn, the FDA commissioner, for “enforcement discretion” so they could use their own lab-developed tests.
“We are now many weeks into the response with still no diagnostic or surveillance test available outside of CDC for the vast majority of our member laboratories,” Scott Becker, chief executive of the Association of Public Health Laboratories, and Grace Kubin, lab services director at the Texas Department of State Health Services, wrote to Hahn on Feb. 24 in a letter reviewed by Reuters.
In an interview, Becker, whose group represents more than 100 state and local health laboratories, called the letter a “Hail Mary” pass, an act of desperation.
“The entire lab community was really coming unglued. We knew we could develop tests and were very capable of doing that, but we felt hamstrung” Becker told Reuters.
He said labs wanted FDA to make more tests available so they could run more patient samples at a faster pace.
Two days after receiving Becker’s letter, the FDA commissioner said his agency was ready to approve new outside tests quickly - if its requirements for accuracy were satisfied.
“False diagnostic test results can lead to significant adverse public health consequences,” Hahn wrote to the Association of Public Health Laboratories in a Feb. 26 letter, “not only serious implications for individual patient care but also serious implications for the analyses of disease progression and for public health decision-making.”
Under increasing pressure, the FDA relented and removed many of the bureaucratic obstacles. On Feb. 29, the agency said public and private labs, including academic medical centers, could start using their own tests before the FDA had completed its full review. Laboratories had 15 business days to submit a completed application, which could be approved retroactively.
That same day, the Trump administration confirmed the first death in the United States from the coronavirus, a man in his 50s in Washington state.
On March 2, Stenzel at the FDA’s diagnostic testing office hosted a webinar for lab test developers, highlighting additional challenges, including a shortage of viral samples needed for validation of test results. Some labs also have reported shortages of other key supplies and ingredients, as well as the need for more trained personnel.
As U.S. regulators rewrote their policies, South Korean municipalities were opening roadside testing facilities across the country, collecting samples in minutes while people sat in their cars.
At a closed-door meeting last week in Congress, U.S. Representative Raul Ruiz, a Democrat from California and an emergency-room physician who treated patients during the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak, pressed the FDA commissioner and other members of the Trump administration on why South Korea was lapping the United States in its response.
“Why don’t we have drive-through testing like South Korea?” Ruiz asked leaders of the president’s coronavirus task force.
Ruiz told Reuters the officials said they were working on it. On their own, some hospitals and communities have begun offering drive-through testing in Colorado, New York, Texas and elsewhere.
In recent days, as the public criticism grew louder, Trump appointed a testing czar to improve coordination across agencies. The FDA launched a 24-hour hotline for

laboratories needing help to accelerate testing, approved two company applications for higher-volume testing and granted states the flexibility to authorize new tests so labs can bypass the FDA.

Despite the new moves, Ruiz said he fears America is still weeks away from approaching what South Korea has accomplished. “I think months have been lost here,” Ruiz said. “Maybe we should look into purchasing South Korea’s tests.”
That may happen. Both Kogene and SolGent Co, two of the COVID-19 test-makers approved in South Korea, said their companies have an eye on the U.S. market.
“The FDA asked us to proceed with applications quickly,” Kogene executive Myoah Baek said.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 02:06:24 AM by Tom Scully »

Online Tom Scully

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5113 on: April 01, 2020, 02:04:23 AM »
   :D What utter bias partisanship. Who told you this? Read instead of rant....
 https://thehill.com/homenews/media/485025-ap-fact-checkers-find-biden-bloomberg-paint-distorted-picture-on-trump-cdc
Or is The Hill "not independent" enough?What embarrasses me is finding myself reading the venomous crap that I find in this thread. 
And Plant---I don't need your sniveling "suggestions".
Hoping you will get what you deserve.

Trump banned travel from China in January and everyone called him a racist. He then banned travel from Europe in March and the Europeans said that was too extreme.

Then they all woke up and started banning travel from China and Europe started banning flights from one country to the next inside Europe.


Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-briefing-14/Briefing - Healthcare
Issued on: March 30, 2020
Rose Garden
March 29, 2020
5:43 P.M. EDT
......
....THE PRESIDENT:  Appreciate it.   Please.
MR.PESICKA:  Thank you, Mr. President.  Let me first start by thanking the administration for all the support you have provided to the industry.  And one of the things we did — we did hear the challenge.  And starting in January, we’ve ramped up our production in the Americas, including our facility in North Carolina, where we are now manufacturing an additional 40 to 50 million masks per month to get into the U.S. healthcare system.
And we talked a little about this in the pre-meeting: One of the issues we’re struggling with is the demand increase.  You know, used an anecdotal example of one hospital in New York that traditionally uses roughly ten- to twenty thousand masks a week are now using two- to three hundred thousand masks a week.  So you multiply that times the entire pop- — the entire U.S., let alone the same demand outside of the U.S.  That’s part of the issue we’re running into: Is even with a significant ramp-up in supply, you know, there’s still that demand that is — that is much greater than that supply.
THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you very much.
MR.PESICKA:  Thank you.
THE PRESIDENT:  And I bring that up because when we discussed, back in a room — we were in a conference room — a very nice one, actually; it’s called the Cabinet Room — that statement was made that they’ve been delivering for years, 10- to 20,000 masks.  Okay, it’s a New York hospital.  Very — it’s packed all the time.  How do you go from 10 to 20, to 300,000?  10- to 20,000 masks to 300,000?
Even though this is different, something is going on, and you ought to look into it as reporters.  Where are the masks going?  Are they going out the back door?
How do you go from 10,000 to 300,000?  And we have that in a lot of different places.  So, somebody should probably look into that, because I just don’t see, from a practical standpoint, how that’s possible to go from that to that.  And we have that happening in numerous places — not to that extent; that was the highest number I’ve heard.  That’s the highest number you’ve seen, I would imagine, right?
But this man makes them and delivers them to a lot of hospitals.  He knows the system better than anybody.  And I think you were more surprised than I was when you saw that number.  So thank you very much.  I hope I didn’t get any of your clients in trouble, but it could be that they are in trouble.  So they have to look at that in New York.
FEMA is working with these companies to launch Project Airbridge to expedite the movement of critical supplies from other countries to the United States.  The first flight arrived at JFK Airport, New York, this morning, filled with 80 tons of personal protective equipment, including 130,000 N95 respirators — those are the ones that we were talking about before — 1.8 million face masks and gowns, 10.3 million gloves, and many other things.  Millions and millions of different items.
FEMA has scheduled 19 additional flights and is adding more daily.  We hope to have about 50 flights.  We’re going to have — I think including the one that came in today, we’re up at 51 flights with these massive planes from the different companies.  That was so nice to be here today.  Would you like to say something on behalf?  Please, come up.  Thank you.
MS. LANE:  Thank you, Mr President, for the incredible leadership.  I will share with you that UPS is really proud to be part of this effort.....

Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-briefing/
Remarks by President Trump and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in a Press Briefing
Healthcare  Issued on: March 30, 2020
Rose Garden 5:12 P.M. EDT
......
.....Q    Sir, what do you say to Americans who are upset with you over the way you —
THE PRESIDENT:  Here we go.
Q    — downplayed this crisis over the last couple of months?  “We have it very much under control in this country.  The coronavirus is very much under control in the USA.  It’s going to disappear.  It’s like a miracle.  It will disappear.”
March 4th: “We have a very small number of people in this country infected.”
March 10th: “We’re prepared.  We’re doing a great job with it.  It will go away.  Just stay calm.  It will go away.”
THE PRESIDENT:  Well, isn’t it true?  It will go away.
Q    What do you say to Americans who believe that you got this wrong?
THE PRESIDENT:  And I do want them to stay calm.  And we are doing a great job.  If you look at those individual statements, they’re all true.  Stay calm.  It will go away.  You know it — you know it is going away, and it will go away.  And we’re going to have a great victory.
And it’s people like you and CNN that say things like that.  That — it’s why people just don’t want to listen to CNN anymore.  You could ask a normal question.  The statements I made are: I want to keep the country calm.  I don’t want to panic in the country.  I could cause panic much better than even you.  I could do much — I would make you look like a minor league player.  But you know what?  I don’t want to do that.

Quote
https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/29/opinions/coronavirus-personal-protective-equipment-obeidallah/index.html
Trump administration sent protective medical gear to China while he minimized the virus threat to US
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
Updated 7:53 AM ET, Mon March 30, 2020

....The situation is so dire one New Jersey doctor described it as "sending medical professionals like lambs to the slaughterhouse."

Concerns about a dwindling supply of PPE are not new. Back on February 7, the World Health Organization sounded alarm bells about "the limited stock of PPE," noting demand was 100 times higher than normal for this equipment.
Yet the same day as the WHO warning, the Trump administration announced that it was transporting to China nearly 17.8 tons (more than 35,000 pounds) of "masks, gowns, gauze, respirators, and other vital materials." As Secretary of State Mike Pompeo noted in the press release announcing this shipment, "These donations are a testament to the generosity of the American people."


Americans indeed are a generous people. We want to help those in need. And at the time these medical supplies were shipped, more than 28,000 people in China were infected with nearly 600 deaths attributed to the virus. But how could Trump allow tons of vital medical equipment Americans to be transported to another country in February if, as he has claimed since January, he fully understood the risk the United States was facing from the virus.

As a reminder, the first known case of coronavirus case on US soil was confirmed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on January 21, 2020.
The next day, Trump was asked about the virus while attending the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos. CNBC anchor Joe Kernen asked the President: "The CDC has identified a case of coronavirus in Washington state ... have you been briefed by the CDC?" to which Trump responded, "I have." Kernen continued, "Are there worries about a pandemic at this point?" Trump declared: "No. Not at all. And — we're — we have it totally under control. It's one person coming in from China, and we have it under control. It's — going to be just fine."
Trump again on January 30 assured Americans he understood the threat posed by the virus and was prepared, stating, "We have it very well under control," adding, "We're working very closely with China and other countries, and we think it's going to have a very good ending for us ... that I can assure you."
On February 5, US lawmakers were pressing the Trump administration on its preparedness for a possible widespread coronavirus outbreak in the US, with some slamming the administration's failure to communicate with the states about how the White House would be addressing it.

By February 6, the United States had 12 known confirmed cases in Wisconsin, California, Washington, Arizona, Massachusetts and Illinois — and with mass testing not yet begun the number of infected was likely far higher.
It was in this climate that the Trump administration announced its aid transport to China. Pompeo bragged on Twitter that the administration had "coordinated with U.S. organizations to transport" goods to China including, "Personal protective equipment."
Now compare that to March 18, when Trump defiantly told governors pressing him to help their states obtain similar equipment: "The federal governments not supposed to be out there buying vast amounts of items and then shipping," adding, "We're not a shipping clerk."

Just three days after these goods arrived in China, Trump again bragged that the United States was in "great shape" when it came to the virus. He then added to assure an increasingly concerned America about Covid-19, "You know, a lot of people think that goes away in April with the heat — as the heat comes in," reiterating, "Typically, that will go away in April."

I won't be so glib as to ask what happened to Trump's "America First" policy. That's too easy. But the fact Trump claimed to comprehend the risk posed by the coronavirus and then shipped nearly 18 tons of equipment that includes much of what our medical staff are now pleading for means either he was lying or is dangerously incompetent. You can pick which one you believe. But the results are the same for our valiant health care workers who are working tirelessly to save lives from Covid-19. ....

I want to have our country be calm and strong, and fight and win, and it will go away. And it is incredible the job that all of these people are doing — putting them all together — the job that they’re doing.
I am very proud of the job they’re doing, that Mike Pence is doing, that the task force has done, that Honeywell and Procter & Gamble and Mike, and all of these people have done.  I’m very proud.  It’s — it’s almost a miracle, and it is — the way it’s all come together.

And instead of asking a nasty, snarky question like that, you should ask a real question.  And other than that, I’m going to go to somebody else.
Please, go ahead.  Please.
Q    You expressed some concern in the past that medical supplies were going out the back door —
THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah.
Q    — and that, perhaps, some hospitals were doing things worse than hoarding.
THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I expressed what was told to me by a tremendous power in the business.  He said that, at a New York hospital, for a long period of time, he was giving 10,000, maybe maximum 20,000 masks over a short time.  And all of a sudden, he’s giving 300,000.  And I said, “No matter how bad this is, could that be possible?”  He said, “No.”  So there’s only a couple of things that could happen.  Is it going out the back door?
And I’ve reported it to the city and let the city take a look at it.  But when you go from 10,000 masks to 300,000 masks, Mike, over the same period of time, there’s something going on.  Now, I’m not making any charges, but when everyone is looking for masks — and, by the way, that’s another thing: We’re making a lot of masks.  And the sterilization process is going to save a lot of time and a lot of masks.
But when you have the biggest distributor of product that distributes to many of the big hospitals and hospital chains, and he brings up a statistic like that — and I know you’re trying to make a big deal out of it, but you shouldn’t be.  You should actually go over to the hospital and find out why.  You shouldn’t be asking me.  I’m just saying that’s the way it is.
Q    Are you —
THE PRESIDENT:  You should go over there as a great reporter.  I have no idea who you are, but that’s okay.  You should go over there, go to the hospital, and find out: How come you used to get 10,000 masks and you had a full hospital?  New York City — always full.  And how come now you have 300,000 masks?  Despite the virus and all, you have three- — how do you go from 10 [thousand] to 300,000?  And this is very serious stuff.  I mean, I could see from 10 to 20, or from 10 to 40 or 50 or something.  But how do you go from 10 [thousand] to 300,000 masks?
So what I think you should do as a — I’m sure you’re a wonderful investigative reporter.  You should go to the hospital and find out why.
Okay, yeah.
Q    Are you asking your DOJ to look into it, sir?
THE PRESIDENT:  Steve, please.

Q    You said there’s challenging times ahead in the next 30 days.  What’s the U.S. economy going to look like when (inaudible) the other side?
......
....Q    Mr. President —
THE PRESIDENT:  Please.
Q    Thank you, Mr. President.  You said several times that the United States has ramped up testing.  I’ll just talk a little quicker — or a little louder.
Mr. President, you said several times that the United States has ramped up testing, but the United States is still not testing per capita as many people as other countries like South Korea.  Why is that?  And when do you think that that number will be on par with other countries?
And Dr. —
THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah, well, it’s — it’s very much on par.

Q    Not per capita —
THE PRESIDENT:  Look — look — per capita.  We have areas of country that’s very tight.  I know South Korea better than anybody.  It’s a — very tight.  Do you know how many people are in Seoul?  Do you know how big the city of Seoul is?
Q    But the question is about (inaudible).
THE PRESIDENT:  Thirty-eight million people.  That’s bigger than anything we have.  Thirty-eight million people all tightly wound together.

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seoul_Capital_Area
.... • Capital area
11,704 km2 (4,519 sq mi)
Population (2018)
 • Metro 25,674,800
 • Percentage of South Korea's total population
~50% (51 million)

We have vast farmlands.  We have vast areas where they don’t have much of a problem.  In some cases, they have no problem whatsoever.  We have done more tests.  What I didn’t — I didn’t talk about per capita.  We have done more tests, by far, than any country in the world, by far.
Our testing is also better than any country in the world.  And when you look at that, as simple as that looks, that’s something that’s a game changer, and every country wants that.  Every country.
So rather than asking a question like that, you should congratulate the people that have done this testing, because we inherited — this administration inherited a broken system, a system that was obsolete, a system that didn’t work.  It was okay for a tiny, small group of people, but once you got beyond that, it didn’t work.
We have built an incredible system to the fact, where we have now done more tests than any other country in the world.  And now the technology is really booming.
I just spoke to — well, I spoke to a lot.  I’m not going to even mention.  I spoke to a number of different testing companies today, and the job that they’ve done and the job that they’re doing is incredible.
But when Abbott comes out and does this so quickly, it’s really unreal.  In fact, one company, I have to say, that stands out in the job — and I think I can say this; I don’t want to insult anybody else — but Roche.  Roche has been incredible in the testing job they’ve done.  And they’re ramping it up exponentially.  It’s up, up, up, up.  And you should be saying congratulations instead of asking a really snarky question, because I know exactly what you mean by that.
You should be saying congratulations to the men and women who have done this job, who have inherited a broken testing system, and who have made it great.  And if you don’t say it, I’ll say it.  I want to congratulate all of the people.  You have done a fantastic job.
And we will see you all tomorrow.  Thank you very much.  Thank you.  Thank you.
END
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 02:06:42 AM by Tom Scully »

Offline Royell Storing

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5114 on: April 01, 2020, 02:10:20 AM »
No one called Drumpf a racist for banning travel from China or Europe. I don't think anyone even criticized him for it. That's all in his head. He's a racist because he called it the "Chinese Virus". He blames Xi Jinping for creating and releasing the virus to destroy the US economy so he would lose the election and Biden would end the trade war. That's the way this tin foil hat CT nutjob POTUS' mind works. His mentor is Alex Jones.

    Wrong! I guess You missed one of those hilarious Bunker Interviews of Uncle Joe.

Online Tom Scully

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5115 on: April 01, 2020, 02:49:52 AM »
    Wrong! I guess You missed one of those hilarious Bunker Interviews of Uncle Joe.

Royell, you certainly are shameless !

……..
(Trump) BOLDLY LIES ON CAMERA ABOUT WHAT HE WAS MADE AWARE OF AT LEAST 2 WEEKS AGO! :
Quote
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/reRemarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Briefing
Healthcare
Issued on: March 30, 2020
Rose Garden
March 29, 2020
5:43 P.M. EDT marks-president-trump-vice-president-pence-members-coronavirus-task-force-press-briefing-14/

……THE PRESIDENT:  I just want to reiterate, because a lot of people have been asking, “Well, what would have happened if we did nothing?  Did nothing — we just rode it out.”
And I’ve been asking that question to Tony and Deborah, and they’ve been talking to me about it for a long time.  Other people have been asking that question.  And I think we got our most accurate study today, or certainly most comprehensive. Think of the number: 2.2 — potentially 2.2 million people if we did nothing.  If we didn’t do the distancing, if we didn’t do all of the things that we’re doing.  And when you hear those numbers, you start to realize that with the kind of work we went through last week, with the $2.2 trillion, it no longer sounds like a lot, right?

 So you’re talking about — when I heard the number today — first time I’ve heard that number, because I’ve been asking the same question that some people have been asking — I felt even better about what we did last week with the $2.2 trillion, because you’re talking about a potential of up to 2.2 million.  And some people said it could even be higher than that.  So you’re talking about 2.2. million deaths — 2.2 million people from this.
And so, if we can hold that down, as we’re saying, to 100,000 — that’s a horrible number — maybe even less, but to 100,000; so we have between 100- and 200,000 — we all, together, have done a very good job.  But 2.2, up to 2.2 million deaths and maybe even beyond that.  I’m feeling very good about what we did last week....….

  When the new corona cases crest here in the U.S. in 2+weeks, the Facts/Numbers in comparison to other countries around the world will support the swift/steady decisions made by Trump. Of course, You Haters want nothing to do with actual Facts. Once those annoying Facts catch up to You, You immediately move the goal posts. Same Old Play Book every time.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 02:55:08 AM by Tom Scully »

Online Gerry Down

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5116 on: April 01, 2020, 02:51:42 AM »
I just wonder are some guys jealous of Trump cos he has made so much money? Not saying you are, you may have some valid reasons, but it does seem that there is a distinct motivation to always skew things against Trump.

Online Tom Scully

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5117 on: April 01, 2020, 02:57:57 AM »
I just wonder are some guys jealous of Trump cos he has made so much money? Not saying you are, you may have some valid reasons, but it does seem that there is a distinct motivation to always skew things against Trump.

War is peace, up is down, slave labor is freedom! Got it!

Quote
….From a psychological standpoint, it is a natural next stage in evolution: greater self-reliance.  Political offices attract personality-disordered people looking for power, and personality cults encourage people with developmental defects looking for a father figure.   

https://twitter.com/BandyXLee1/status/1241779351257059329

Quote
…..They are, for the most part, developmentally wounded “authoritarians”, which means they submit readily to authority....

https://twitter.com/BandyXLee1/status/1244463041913200640

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Liwacz

Jan Liwacz (born 4 October 1898 in Dukla, died 22 April 1980 in Bystrzyca Kłodzka) was a master blacksmith and prisoner of Auschwitz concentration camp best known for the infamous "Arbeit macht frei" slogan over the camp's main entrance gate that he made. When the SS ordered him to make this sign, he placed a hidden message in the word ARBEIT: he turned the letter “B” upside down. ....
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 03:11:20 AM by Tom Scully »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5118 on: April 01, 2020, 03:13:45 AM »
Trump banned travel from China in January and everyone called him a racist. He then banned travel from Europe in March and the Europeans said that was too extreme.

Then they all woke up and started banning travel from China and Europe started banning flights from one country to the next inside Europe.

Your point is ridiculous. People called him a racist for bringing race into the situation like he always does by calling it a "Chinese virus".

Benedict Donald banned flights after the virus was already here and bungled everything. Refused to close down the country and called this whole thing a hoax after this orange turd knew for months about this deadly pandemic and refused to do anything about it. He called it a "hoax" made up by Democrats in front of his deranged degenerates who eat up every lying word he spits out. Said it "will magically go away" and is a "common cold". All bogus lies only caring about poll numbers and the upcoming election and not people's lives.     

He refuses to implement the Defense Production Act. He gutted the CDC and shipped 17.8 tons of our medical supplies and equipment to China when our doctors and nurses could be using them here instead of diapers and garbage bags for masks and gowns. What does  Benedict Donald do after he was called out on that? He lies and blames President Obama for depleting the medical supply stock. Then he attacks New York hospitals including doctors and nurses for "stealing" and "hoarding" medical supplies which is b.s.   

Right wingers still refuse to admit Benedict Donald is the cause of this catastrophe like every credible expert states. Benedict Donald is going to lose in a landslide in November.


White House Economists Warned of Pandemic Last Year

“White House economists published a study last September that warned a pandemic disease could kill a half million Americans and devastate the economy,” the New York Times reports.

“It went unheeded inside the administration.”

“The existence of that warning undermines administration officials’ contentions in recent weeks that no one could have seen the virus damaging the economy as it has. The study’s lead author, who has since left the White House, now says it would make sense for the administration to effectively shut down most economic activity for two to eight months to slow the virus.”

https://politicalwire.com/2020/03/31/white-house-economists-warned-in-2019-of-pandemic/


White House Forecasts Show Many More Deaths

President Trump’s public health advisers project that the coronavirus could kill 100,000 to 240,000 Americans — even with strict social distancing guidelines in place, Axios reports.

Meanwhile, Andy Slavitt reports “numbers floating around the White House are 400,000 and some think that requires optimism.”

https://politicalwire.com/2020/03/31/white-house-forecasts-show-many-more-deaths/
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 03:46:08 AM by Rick Plant »

Offline Rick Plant

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Re: Trump supporters and conspiracy theory
« Reply #5119 on: April 01, 2020, 03:18:37 AM »
I just wonder are some guys jealous of Trump cos he has made so much money? Not saying you are, you may have some valid reasons, but it does seem that there is a distinct motivation to always skew things against Trump.

Benedict Donald is in serious debt to Deutsche Bank and went bankrupt 6 times. I do have a valid reason why I don't like him. He is a pathological liar who has destroyed our country. People like you, no matter how much damage he causes, still cover for him and attack people who show his lies and destruction. Why do you worship an impeached corrupt career criminal refusing to see the damage he caused?   

 

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