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Author Topic: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.  (Read 5636 times)

Offline Michael T. Griffith

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2020, 12:09:32 AM »
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I should add one more point for clarification, a point that has been made by several scholars, including Dr. Mantik: JFK's backward movement consists of two movement--first the backward movement of his head, and then, logically enough, the backward movement of his shoulders and upper body. Itek discussed this fact in their study. Dr. Mantik says that we simply do not know how much the editors exaggerated the speed of these movements but that the original movements were certainly markedly less rapid.

Way back in 1998, based on Dr. Mantik's and others' research, I said that the backward head snap was actually evidence of alteration because the movement was too rapid to have occurred in the real world because it could have been caused by a bullet, a muscle spasm, or a jet effect.

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2020, 12:09:32 AM »


Online Joe Elliott

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2020, 12:24:42 AM »

I should add one more point for clarification, a point that has been made by several scholars, including Dr. Mantik: JFK's backward movement consists of two movement--first the backward movement of his head, and then, logically enough, the backward movement of his shoulders and upper body. Itek discussed this fact in their study. Dr. Mantik says that we simply do not know how much the editors exaggerated the speed of these movements but that the original movements were certainly markedly less rapid.

Way back in 1998, based on Dr. Mantik's and others' research, I said that the backward head snap was actually evidence of alteration because the movement was too rapid to have occurred in the real world because it could have been caused by a bullet, a muscle spasm, or a jet effect.

The next time you need to make one more point for clarification, make certain that the Dr. Zacharko who you referred to as a “Neuroscientist” was actually a “Professor of Psychology”. Otherwise, people may get the mistaken impression that your “expert” had a lot more expertise on the matter in question, “neuromuscular spasms”, than he really had.

And this thread is about Dr. Zacharko, not Dr. Mantik.

Question:

Do you have any explanation as to why you always referred to Dr. Zacharko as a “Neuroscientist” and not by a more accurate label, a “Professor of Psychology”?




I might note that this is a common pattern with you. A backwards of 2 mph becomes “thrown back violently”. A “Professor of Psychology” becomes a “Neuroscientist”. You always choose the most misleading phrase to help bolster a weak argument.

Online Joe Elliott

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2020, 12:43:24 AM »

Always has been although one of the less gifted.

BTW, all this Neuro Nutter Nonsense is pure speculation. JFK simply fainted, back and to the left...


I don't know what type of goats the army used in 1948 when 10,000 of them were shot while being filmed, to get insights on what happens when various parts of the body are wounded by bullets. I don't image they would have used "fainting goats", otherwise known as a Myotonic goat. These goats “faint” when startled. These reactions cannot be induced in a goat that is already unconscious.

In any case, the observed reaction in the fainting goat is nothing like the movements seen in the 1948 goat film. And that goat was given an anesthetic to make the goat totally unconscious, so it could not have been startled.

By the way, humans can also have a related disorder called congenital myotonia, although in humans, this does not result in “fainting”.

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2020, 12:43:24 AM »


Online Joe Elliott

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2020, 01:13:34 AM »
I have no dog in this race, this is just one big rabbit hole.

It doesn't at all effect that the WC was a coverup and the evidence couldn't support their preconceived conclusions.

That's what I would be concerned with if I were you.

BTW, JFK wore a back brace, were the goats braced?

JFK’s back brace won’t cause his head to accelerate backwards, at a faster rate than the torso. If his body’s acceleration backwards was caused by the back brace (which I greatly doubt) his head would not have been accelerating backwards faster than the torso. Not unless he was wearing a neck brace as well.

No, it wasn’t the back brace. No, it wasn’t the limousine accelerating. The acceleration of the head backwards during a quarter second, (z313 through z318), the right elbow shooting upwards (z315 through z318) by six inches, could only be caused by JFK’s muscles. But CTers will continue to look for some other explanation, any other explanation, for this movement. Maybe it is time for CTers to call upon the supernatural and suggest a poltergeist.


In any case, this is a thread about Dr. Zacharko, so if you want to talk about the back brace or anything else, please start up another thread.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 01:42:29 AM by Joe Elliott »

Online Joe Elliott

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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #28 on: July 04, 2020, 01:41:15 AM »

Question:

If you want an opinion from a neuroscientist on whether JFK’s backward movement is caused by a neuromuscular spasm, why not go ask a real neuroscientist?

Why ask a Psychology professor, who has been described as a Professor of Psychology, working with the Department of Psychology, as described below;

https://books.google.com/books?id=WBzaBwAAQBAJ&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=%22robert+m+zacharko%22+%22professor+of+psychology%22+%22department+of+psychology%22&source=bl&ots=mH3XW37yd5&sig=ACfU3U2lwRX7sX8akU0brivswXb7UUhPXQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj5wu3GpbDqAhUtKDQIHSIEAO8Q6AEwAHoECAIQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22robert%20m%20zacharko%22%20%22professor%20of%20psychology%22%20%22department%20of%20psychology%22&f=false



And in his obituary:

Quote
He finished his career as a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University.

https://heritagefh.ca/tribute/details/338/Robert-Zacharko/obituary.html

Yes, the obituary also says:

Quote
Post-graduate studies followed at University of Saskatoon where he received his doctorate specializing in the study of neuroscience.



But as the website a Carleton makes clear:

Quote
Neuroscience is an emerging academic discipline that includes physiological, anatomical, biochemical, and behavioural studies of the nervous system.

http://www3.carleton.ca/calendars/archives/grad/9798/SCIENCE/Institute_of_Neuroscience.htm

A “Neuroscientist” can be an expert in either physiological, anatomical, biochemical studies, fields of use in evaluating the neuromuscular spasm hypothesis. but also includes behavioral studies, i.e.: Psychology, a field of study that is not so pertinent.



Question:

Why not use a “Neuroscientist” who really has some expertise in either physiological, anatomical or biochemical studies to decide on this question?

Answer:

Because Mr. Griffith could find none. But he could find a Psychology professor who would give a favorable opinion.


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Re: A Question About Dr. Robert Zacharko.
« Reply #28 on: July 04, 2020, 01:41:15 AM »