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Author Topic: Dear Mr Hunt...  (Read 2787 times)

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2019, 11:20:57 PM »
Dear Walter,

Please don't tell me that you didn't read all of my longish post a couple of posts back.

Because if so, then you're almost as lazy as xxxxxxxxx, dude.

(Hint: Rhymes with "confetti")

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)

"Handwriting expert Joseph P. McNally wrote in his report that he found the note highly suspicious."

In what way?  What did he mean the note was "highly suspicious"?


JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2019, 11:20:57 PM »


Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2019, 11:58:04 PM »
Dear Walter,

Aren't you capable of reading?

Why are you pulling a Xxxxxxxxx on me?

(Hint: His name rhymes with
"In da confetti")

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)

In what way?  What did he mean the note was "highly suspicious"?

Online Thomas Graves

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2019, 12:31:17 AM »
In what way?  What did he mean the note was "highly suspicious"?

Dear Walter,

Any reasonable person who actually ... gasp ... read McNally's report would assume he meant that the "Dear Mr. Hunt" note was probably a forgery.

Have you read his report?

Here it is:

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF JOSEPH P. MC NALLY

Procedures (31) I conducted an examination and comparison of the signatures and writings on the items described in this report. At the time of the initial work in Washington, D.C., I made color photomacrographs of the signatures and the writings on these documents. I then made slides from the photomacrographs, which I subsequently projected and studied. The signatures were a particular focus of my examination. (32) I first met with committee staff in Washington, D.C., on September L 1977, to examine and photograph signatures and writings on documents available at the Department of Defense and the National Archives. On September 17 1977, I went to the committee's offices to examine and photograph a photo-reproduction designated item No. 47. On May 8, 1978, I returned to Washington, D.C., to make additional examinations and photographs. These were made at the Department of Defense, the National Archives, and the committee offices. (33) On July 6, 1978, I met with other members of the handwriting panel to review the documents examined and to consult with them. Subsequently, I prepared my final report with my findings and conclusions.

Conclusions (34) I, The signatures "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald" on the following documents were all written by the same person: 1,2,4,5,7,11, and 12. Marine Corps documents. 3. U.S. Armed Forces Loyalty Certificate. 6. USMC fingerprint form. 8. ID card---U.S. Armed Forces, Japan. 9 and 10. Three (3) passport signatures. 13. Carbon of U.S. Armed Forces Report of Discharge. ---------------------------------- *In particular, members noted that not all documents were available in their original. It is standard practice in the profession of questioned document examination to make definitive conclusions only about documents examined in their original. Thus the panel members gave only tentative opinions for items provided them in some type of facsimile.

234 14. Selective Service registration. 15. Selective Service card. 17. Citizenship revocation. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 27, 45 and 46. Signatures on U.S.P.O. applications (4). 31. Photo of Lee Oswald (back). 32. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 33. Fair Play for Cuba card. 34. Passport application. 36. New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form, dated Aug. 9, 1968. 37. Photocopy of New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form. 38. Letter to the "Communist Party U.S.A." 39. Hotel registry. 40. Application for Cuban visa. 41. Photograph of carbon of application for Cuban visa. 42. Letter to Russian Embassy. 43. Employment form. 44. Form W4. 45. P.O. Box 6225 application. 46. Receipt for key to P.O. Box 6225. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. 55. Dallas Public Library card. (35)

II. The script writing on the following documents was done by the same person: 17. Citizenship revocation. 19. Stationery of Holland-American Line. 20. Self-questionnaire. 21. Photocopy of self-questionnaire. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 29. Xerox of Klein's money order. 30. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 38. Letter to "Communist Party U.S.A.". 42. Letter to the Russian Embassy. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. (36)

III. A number of documents have script and handprint, both of which are by the same person (the script writings of these documents correspond to that of documents listed above under I and II): 16. Historical diary. 18. Aline Mosby interview. 26. Employment application with letter. 30. Envelope and order form--Klein's. 43. Employment application and letter of resignation. (37)

IV. A few documents have handprint only. On those listed below, all the hand print is by the same person, and it corresponds to the handprint on documents listed above under III. Since the script in items under III corresponds to the script in items under II, it can be concluded that the items under II, III, and IV correspond. 9. Inside cover of passport. 27, 45 and 46. U.S.P.O. forms--box rental. 51. Speech. 235 (38)

V. In summary, the script writing (much of it on documents also bearing the signature of Lee H. Oswald) is identifiable with the signatures, "Lee H. Oswald." From the script writing on the documents described in section II, it is possible to create composite signatures, "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald," which correspond to the Oswald signatures on the documents listed in section I. (39)

VI. The Russian language writing on documents 23, 56, and 57 is by the same person. Although there are a few letter design forms which appear to be in the Cyrillic alphabet, the bulk are in the Latin alphabet and correspond to their counterparts in the script and hand print in the documents listed in sections I, II, III, and IV above. (40)

VII. The two signatures, "Lee H. Oswald," in item 52 (receipts salary--Texas School Book Depository) do not correspond to the Oswald signatures as described under section I. The handwriting appears to be more skillful, with a more rhythmic flow. It varies in slant and differs in proportion. The overall writing pattern differs from the Oswald signatures in section I, as do the individual letter designs. The "L" of item 52 is taller and without an eyelet loop at the top right of the "L" as found in the section I signatures. The "H" of item 52 is distinctly different from the "II" in the section I signatures. The "0" of item 5'2 retraces on itself, not the case in the section I signatures, where it loops around at the top right and usually swings into the following "s". The "d" of item 52 reverses slant to go backhand, which does not occur in the section I signatures. (41)

VIII. The signature, "Lee Harvey Oswald," on the Hunt note (item 4-7) does not correspond to the Oswald signatures described under section I. To begin with, the bulk of the documents which are signed with the full name, "Lee Harvey Oswald," are more formal in tone. For example, the full name appears on all but one of the Marine Corps documents. The full name appears infrequently elsewhere-usually only the first name, middle initial, and last name are used. Further, in the Hunt note, the middle name "Harvey" is misspelled-the "e" appears to be missing; the "H" of "Harvey" differs from that found in the section I signatures; the "ar" of "Harvey" is ellided to a point that does not occur in any section I signatures; the "0" of "Oswald" is retraced part of the way along the left side, not true of the section I Oswald signatures; and the ending "d" of Oswald is smaller than the preceding "l", whereas most of the ending "d"s of the section I signatures are taller than the "l" (only in signatures that appear to be "squeezed-in" is the end "d" shorter than the preceding "1"). (42) While the script writing on the Hunt note is similar in pictorial quality to the writings under section II, the format of the note differs from that of the notes and letters of section II. The writing line is so exact as almost to give the impression it has been made on a ruled line. Usually Oswald writes in an arrhythmic manner--for example, with an irregular and crooked writing line. This writing creates the jumbled effect apparent in the section II documents. (43) From the examinations of item 4-7, it was determined that the signature does not correspond with any of the Oswald signatures of section I. Similarly, the writing does not correspond to that in the section II Oswald documents. (44) I would like to note, however, that the quality of the original photo reproductions of the Hunt note was poor. Under the best of circumstances, reproductions lack clarity and detail. Here, as can be seen from the copies, the original photo reproduction was out of focus, giving the document a fuzzy appearance. Accurate analysis was difficult. The note is highly suspicious. The original would have to be checked in order to make a more definite analysis and reach a definitive conclusion. (45)

IX. An examination and comparison was made of writings and signatures on documents attributed to Marina Oswald. The writings on the note (item 28) are such poor copies that it is virtually impossible to make a definite determination as to whether they correspond with the signatures of Marina Oswald on item 24. There is some similarity between the name in the return address on the envelope of item 28 and the signature of Marina Oswald on her entry papers (item 24), but the return address name is obscured to some extent by the postmark. The rest of the writing on the note (item 28) is not sufficiently parallel to the writing on her entry documents (item 29) and exemplars (item 54) to warrant any effective determination. (46) The name, "A. J. Hidell" on the Fair Play for Cuba card (item 33) was examined and compared with the exemplar writings of Marina Oswald (item 54). It was determined that. the "A. 5. Hidell" of the card (item 33) was written by Marina Oswald (as in item 54). The writing pattern of the signature on the card corresponds with that of the name "A. J. Hidell" as written by Marina Oswald on item 54. The Hidell signature in question is written with the same degree of writing skill as evinced by Marina Oswald. The slant, speed, proportions, et cetera, of the Hidell signature is matched in the writings of Marina Oswald. The design, form, and execution of stroke making up the individual letters of the Hidell signature in question (item 33) correspond to those of the letters in the writing of Marina Oswald (item 54). (47)

X. The "Jack Ruby" signature on the Cuban identification card (item 53) was examined and compared with exemplars of Jack Ruby (item 49). It was determined that the "Jack Ruby" of the Cuban identification card was written by the author of the exemplar signatures attributed to Jack Ruby (item 49). While there is an odd "J" in the identification card which does not occur in the Ruby exemplars, the rest of the letters tally in all respects. The signature has been written quickly, easily, and fluently, consistent with the writing pattern of the known exemplars. The odd "J" may be "accidental" or could be accounted for in additional writing of Ruby, most likely in spontaneous writing contemporaneous with the signature of the identification card. "Request" writing, such as that of item 49, sometimes differs slight extent from "spontaneous" writing. (48)

XI. A check was made of the historical diary (item 16). The 12 pages were written with the same type of writing instrument. The paper used for 11 of the 12 pages is similar; only the last page differs--it is appreciably thinner. The writing has a continuity from page to page and line to line that is indicative of being written about, or at, the same time. It does not give the impression of being "random" as would be expected of a diary extended over a period of time. It appears that this diary has been written within a short period of time and not over any extensive period. 237

Summary of conclusions (49) Virtually all the Lee H. Oswald and Lee Harvey Oswald signatures are by the same person. There is some normal variation among the signatures, and no significant differences along the Oswald signatures identified as being the same. The overall writing pattern consistently similar, and the individual letter designs match throughout without major differences. The same holds true for the script and hand print on these documents that are identified as being written by the same person. (50) The same writing is on the U.S. Postal money order to Klein's (item 29) as is on the various letters and correspondence. The same writing is on the order form and envelope (item 30) as is on the letters and on the inside cover of the passport (item 9). (51) The writing and signatures that appear on the letters (items 25, 32, 38, and 42) agree with the writing and signatures on the U.S. Post Office applications for post office boxes (items 27, 45, and 46). (52) The signature and writing on the back of the photograph (item 31) agree with the signatures and script writing of Oswald (sections and II). (53) Differences indicative of different authorship were found on the "Hunt" note (item 47) and the salary receipts (item 52). (54) It appears that the historical dairy (item 16) was written within a short period of time.

http://jfkassassination.net/parnell/hscahand.htm

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 12:47:57 AM by Thomas Graves »

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2019, 12:31:17 AM »


Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2019, 01:38:38 AM »
Dear Walter,

Any reasonable person who actually ... gasp ... read McNally's report would assume he meant that the "Dear Mr. Hunt" note was probably a forgery.

Have you read his report?

Here it is:

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF JOSEPH P. MC NALLY

Procedures (31) I conducted an examination and comparison of the signatures and writings on the items described in this report. At the time of the initial work in Washington, D.C., I made color photomacrographs of the signatures and the writings on these documents. I then made slides from the photomacrographs, which I subsequently projected and studied. The signatures were a particular focus of my examination. (32) I first met with committee staff in Washington, D.C., on September L 1977, to examine and photograph signatures and writings on documents available at the Department of Defense and the National Archives. On September 17 1977, I went to the committee's offices to examine and photograph a photo-reproduction designated item No. 47. On May 8, 1978, I returned to Washington, D.C., to make additional examinations and photographs. These were made at the Department of Defense, the National Archives, and the committee offices. (33) On July 6, 1978, I met with other members of the handwriting panel to review the documents examined and to consult with them. Subsequently, I prepared my final report with my findings and conclusions.

Conclusions (34) I, The signatures "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald" on the following documents were all written by the same person: 1,2,4,5,7,11, and 12. Marine Corps documents. 3. U.S. Armed Forces Loyalty Certificate. 6. USMC fingerprint form. 8. ID card---U.S. Armed Forces, Japan. 9 and 10. Three (3) passport signatures. 13. Carbon of U.S. Armed Forces Report of Discharge. ---------------------------------- *In particular, members noted that not all documents were available in their original. It is standard practice in the profession of questioned document examination to make definitive conclusions only about documents examined in their original. Thus the panel members gave only tentative opinions for items provided them in some type of facsimile.

234 14. Selective Service registration. 15. Selective Service card. 17. Citizenship revocation. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 27, 45 and 46. Signatures on U.S.P.O. applications (4). 31. Photo of Lee Oswald (back). 32. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 33. Fair Play for Cuba card. 34. Passport application. 36. New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form, dated Aug. 9, 1968. 37. Photocopy of New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form. 38. Letter to the "Communist Party U.S.A." 39. Hotel registry. 40. Application for Cuban visa. 41. Photograph of carbon of application for Cuban visa. 42. Letter to Russian Embassy. 43. Employment form. 44. Form W4. 45. P.O. Box 6225 application. 46. Receipt for key to P.O. Box 6225. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. 55. Dallas Public Library card. (35)

II. The script writing on the following documents was done by the same person: 17. Citizenship revocation. 19. Stationery of Holland-American Line. 20. Self-questionnaire. 21. Photocopy of self-questionnaire. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 29. Xerox of Klein's money order. 30. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 38. Letter to "Communist Party U.S.A.". 42. Letter to the Russian Embassy. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. (36)

III. A number of documents have script and handprint, both of which are by the same person (the script writings of these documents correspond to that of documents listed above under I and II): 16. Historical diary. 18. Aline Mosby interview. 26. Employment application with letter. 30. Envelope and order form--Klein's. 43. Employment application and letter of resignation. (37)

IV. A few documents have handprint only. On those listed below, all the hand print is by the same person, and it corresponds to the handprint on documents listed above under III. Since the script in items under III corresponds to the script in items under II, it can be concluded that the items under II, III, and IV correspond. 9. Inside cover of passport. 27, 45 and 46. U.S.P.O. forms--box rental. 51. Speech. 235 (38)

V. In summary, the script writing (much of it on documents also bearing the signature of Lee H. Oswald) is identifiable with the signatures, "Lee H. Oswald." From the script writing on the documents described in section II, it is possible to create composite signatures, "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald," which correspond to the Oswald signatures on the documents listed in section I. (39)

VI. The Russian language writing on documents 23, 56, and 57 is by the same person. Although there are a few letter design forms which appear to be in the Cyrillic alphabet, the bulk are in the Latin alphabet and correspond to their counterparts in the script and hand print in the documents listed in sections I, II, III, and IV above. (40)

VII. The two signatures, "Lee H. Oswald," in item 52 (receipts salary--Texas School Book Depository) do not correspond to the Oswald signatures as described under section I. The handwriting appears to be more skillful, with a more rhythmic flow. It varies in slant and differs in proportion. The overall writing pattern differs from the Oswald signatures in section I, as do the individual letter designs. The "L" of item 52 is taller and without an eyelet loop at the top right of the "L" as found in the section I signatures. The "H" of item 52 is distinctly different from the "II" in the section I signatures. The "0" of item 5'2 retraces on itself, not the case in the section I signatures, where it loops around at the top right and usually swings into the following "s". The "d" of item 52 reverses slant to go backhand, which does not occur in the section I signatures. (41)

VIII. The signature, "Lee Harvey Oswald," on the Hunt note (item 4-7) does not correspond to the Oswald signatures described under section I. To begin with, the bulk of the documents which are signed with the full name, "Lee Harvey Oswald," are more formal in tone. For example, the full name appears on all but one of the Marine Corps documents. The full name appears infrequently elsewhere-usually only the first name, middle initial, and last name are used. Further, in the Hunt note, the middle name "Harvey" is misspelled-the "e" appears to be missing; the "H" of "Harvey" differs from that found in the section I signatures; the "ar" of "Harvey" is ellided to a point that does not occur in any section I signatures; the "0" of "Oswald" is retraced part of the way along the left side, not true of the section I Oswald signatures; and the ending "d" of Oswald is smaller than the preceding "l", whereas most of the ending "d"s of the section I signatures are taller than the "l" (only in signatures that appear to be "squeezed-in" is the end "d" shorter than the preceding "1"). (42) While the script writing on the Hunt note is similar in pictorial quality to the writings under section II, the format of the note differs from that of the notes and letters of section II. The writing line is so exact as almost to give the impression it has been made on a ruled line. Usually Oswald writes in an arrhythmic manner--for example, with an irregular and crooked writing line. This writing creates the jumbled effect apparent in the section II documents. (43) From the examinations of item 4-7, it was determined that the signature does not correspond with any of the Oswald signatures of section I. Similarly, the writing does not correspond to that in the section II Oswald documents. (44) I would like to note, however, that the quality of the original photo reproductions of the Hunt note was poor. Under the best of circumstances, reproductions lack clarity and detail. Here, as can be seen from the copies, the original photo reproduction was out of focus, giving the document a fuzzy appearance. Accurate analysis was difficult. The note is highly suspicious. The original would have to be checked in order to make a more definite analysis and reach a definitive conclusion. (45)

IX. An examination and comparison was made of writings and signatures on documents attributed to Marina Oswald. The writings on the note (item 28) are such poor copies that it is virtually impossible to make a definite determination as to whether they correspond with the signatures of Marina Oswald on item 24. There is some similarity between the name in the return address on the envelope of item 28 and the signature of Marina Oswald on her entry papers (item 24), but the return address name is obscured to some extent by the postmark. The rest of the writing on the note (item 28) is not sufficiently parallel to the writing on her entry documents (item 29) and exemplars (item 54) to warrant any effective determination. (46) The name, "A. J. Hidell" on the Fair Play for Cuba card (item 33) was examined and compared with the exemplar writings of Marina Oswald (item 54). It was determined that. the "A. 5. Hidell" of the card (item 33) was written by Marina Oswald (as in item 54). The writing pattern of the signature on the card corresponds with that of the name "A. J. Hidell" as written by Marina Oswald on item 54. The Hidell signature in question is written with the same degree of writing skill as evinced by Marina Oswald. The slant, speed, proportions, et cetera, of the Hidell signature is matched in the writings of Marina Oswald. The design, form, and execution of stroke making up the individual letters of the Hidell signature in question (item 33) correspond to those of the letters in the writing of Marina Oswald (item 54). (47)

X. The "Jack Ruby" signature on the Cuban identification card (item 53) was examined and compared with exemplars of Jack Ruby (item 49). It was determined that the "Jack Ruby" of the Cuban identification card was written by the author of the exemplar signatures attributed to Jack Ruby (item 49). While there is an odd "J" in the identification card which does not occur in the Ruby exemplars, the rest of the letters tally in all respects. The signature has been written quickly, easily, and fluently, consistent with the writing pattern of the known exemplars. The odd "J" may be "accidental" or could be accounted for in additional writing of Ruby, most likely in spontaneous writing contemporaneous with the signature of the identification card. "Request" writing, such as that of item 49, sometimes differs slight extent from "spontaneous" writing. (48)

XI. A check was made of the historical diary (item 16). The 12 pages were written with the same type of writing instrument. The paper used for 11 of the 12 pages is similar; only the last page differs--it is appreciably thinner. The writing has a continuity from page to page and line to line that is indicative of being written about, or at, the same time. It does not give the impression of being "random" as would be expected of a diary extended over a period of time. It appears that this diary has been written within a short period of time and not over any extensive period. 237

Summary of conclusions (49) Virtually all the Lee H. Oswald and Lee Harvey Oswald signatures are by the same person. There is some normal variation among the signatures, and no significant differences along the Oswald signatures identified as being the same. The overall writing pattern consistently similar, and the individual letter designs match throughout without major differences. The same holds true for the script and hand print on these documents that are identified as being written by the same person. (50) The same writing is on the U.S. Postal money order to Klein's (item 29) as is on the various letters and correspondence. The same writing is on the order form and envelope (item 30) as is on the letters and on the inside cover of the passport (item 9). (51) The writing and signatures that appear on the letters (items 25, 32, 38, and 42) agree with the writing and signatures on the U.S. Post Office applications for post office boxes (items 27, 45, and 46). (52) The signature and writing on the back of the photograph (item 31) agree with the signatures and script writing of Oswald (sections and II). (53) Differences indicative of different authorship were found on the "Hunt" note (item 47) and the salary receipts (item 52). (54) It appears that the historical dairy (item 16) was written within a short period of time.

http://jfkassassination.net/parnell/hscahand.htm

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)

Any reasonable person who actually read McNally's report would assume he meant that the "Dear Mr. Hunt" note was probably a forgery.

No, Mr Mc Nalley did not indicate or say that he thought the note was a forgery.....

he was undecided as to whether or not the note was genuine.

Joseph P. McNally,  A hand writing expert was undecided whether the note was genuine.... 

I copied the above from the document YOU posted.....Do you know what UNDECIDED means?
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 01:43:04 AM by Walt Cakebread »

Online Thomas Graves

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2019, 05:56:20 AM »
Any reasonable person who actually read McNally's report would assume he meant that the "Dear Mr. Hunt" note was probably a forgery.


No, Mr Mc Nalley did not indicate or say that he thought the note was a forgery.....

he was undecided as to whether or not the note was genuine.

Joseph P. McNally,  A hand writing expert was undecided whether the note was genuine.... 

I copied the above from the document YOU posted.....Do you know what UNDECIDED means?

Dear Walter,

In his report to the HSCA, McNally wrote that the note was not just suspicious but "highly suspicious," and he gave several reasons for coming to that conclusion, including the fact that, unlike in any verified "Lee Harvey Oswald" signatures, the word "Harvey" was mispelled, and the fact that the writing in the note was much straighter than Oswald normally wrote.

http://jfkassassination.net/parnell/hscahand.htm

In his testimony to the HSCA, McNally gave a plausible explanation as to why the photocopy was so "fuzzy" as to be impossible to analyze precicely.

Mr. MCNALLY: The reason we could not reach any
conclusion regarding this particular document is [because] this of course is a photo reproduction. It is a peculiar type of photo reproduction in the fact that we have a photo reproduction, yet at the same time it has some the characteristics of being photoreproduced from a microfilm enlargement which was originally out of focus. [T]he photo reproduction was quite fuzzy. In this particular case it is so fuzzy that an accurate examination could not be made of it. 

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/mrhunt.txt

How clever of the KGB to send Penn Jones (or whomever) a photocopy of a photo enlargment made from an out-of-focus microfilm image, so that the finished product couldn't be analyzed very closely!

But yet, McNally still found the note to be "highly suspicious" for several reasons, two of which I've mentioned for you, above. 

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 06:34:34 AM by Thomas Graves »

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2019, 05:56:20 AM »


Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2019, 07:24:02 AM »
Dear Walter,

In his report to the HSCA, McNally wrote that the note was not just suspicious but "highly suspicious," and he gave several reasons for coming to that conclusion, including the fact that, unlike in any verified "Lee Harvey Oswald" signatures, the word "Harvey" was mispelled, and the fact that the writing in the note was much straighter than Oswald normally wrote.

http://jfkassassination.net/parnell/hscahand.htm

In his testimony to the HSCA, McNally gave a plausible explanation as to why the photocopy was so "fuzzy" as to be impossible to analyze precicely.

Mr. MCNALLY: The reason we could not reach any
conclusion regarding this particular document is [because] this of course is a photo reproduction. It is a peculiar type of photo reproduction in the fact that we have a photo reproduction, yet at the same time it has some the characteristics of being photoreproduced from a microfilm enlargement which was originally out of focus. [T]he photo reproduction was quite fuzzy. In this particular case it is so fuzzy that an accurate examination could not be made of it. 

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/mrhunt.txt

How clever of the KGB to send Penn Jones (or whomever) a photocopy of a photo enlargment made from an out-of-focus microfilm image, so that the finished product couldn't be analyzed very closely!

But yet, McNally still found the note to be "highly suspicious" for several reasons, two of which I've mentioned for you, above. 

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)

the word "Harvey" was mispelled,

No it's not misspelled.....It's just written sloppily .....As if Lee was nervous or in a hurry.....

You're really not up to the task, Mr Mudd....  You're too easily fooled....

BTW....  I also believe the note is highly suspicious....but not that it's a forgery.....  Suspicious because it suddenly surfaces long after the book is closed.

And it was the FBI who let it float to the surface.....  Why did they leak that note???
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 07:42:50 AM by Walt Cakebread »

Offline Rob Caprio

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2019, 05:49:24 PM »
Those that blame the KGB, and thereby Russia, cannot cite one piece of supporting evidence or at the very least give one reason why the Russians would want JFK dead and LBJ as president.

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2019, 05:49:24 PM »


Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2019, 06:22:48 PM »
Those that blame the KGB, and thereby Russia, cannot cite one piece of supporting evidence or at the very least give one reason why the Russians would want JFK dead and LBJ as president.

You're right.....  One of the things that the right wing neo nazi fanatics ( The men who printed the "wanted " poster in the Dallas Newspaper) criticized JFK for was his cooperation with the Russians.   JFK had defused a nuclear bomb by working out a deal with the Russians during the missile crisis in the Fall of 1962. 

Men in Dallas, Like Edwin Walker, HL Hunt, Charles Cabell, Earle Cabell... and many others hated JFK for defusing that situation....

PS...Do you know the "common denominator"  that all of the men listed had in common....    CUBA.....   
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 07:17:46 PM by Walt Cakebread »

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2019, 04:54:05 PM »
Those that blame the KGB, and thereby Russia, cannot cite one piece of supporting evidence or at the very least give one reason why the Russians would want JFK dead and LBJ as president.

Could the Russians have controlled the autopsy?

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2019, 04:54:05 PM »


Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2019, 08:44:58 PM »
Dear Walter,

Any reasonable person who actually ... gasp ... read McNally's report would assume he meant that the "Dear Mr. Hunt" note was probably a forgery.

Have you read his report?

Here it is:

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF JOSEPH P. MC NALLY

Procedures (31) I conducted an examination and comparison of the signatures and writings on the items described in this report. At the time of the initial work in Washington, D.C., I made color photomacrographs of the signatures and the writings on these documents. I then made slides from the photomacrographs, which I subsequently projected and studied. The signatures were a particular focus of my examination. (32) I first met with committee staff in Washington, D.C., on September L 1977, to examine and photograph signatures and writings on documents available at the Department of Defense and the National Archives. On September 17 1977, I went to the committee's offices to examine and photograph a photo-reproduction designated item No. 47. On May 8, 1978, I returned to Washington, D.C., to make additional examinations and photographs. These were made at the Department of Defense, the National Archives, and the committee offices. (33) On July 6, 1978, I met with other members of the handwriting panel to review the documents examined and to consult with them. Subsequently, I prepared my final report with my findings and conclusions.

Conclusions (34) I, The signatures "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald" on the following documents were all written by the same person: 1,2,4,5,7,11, and 12. Marine Corps documents. 3. U.S. Armed Forces Loyalty Certificate. 6. USMC fingerprint form. 8. ID card---U.S. Armed Forces, Japan. 9 and 10. Three (3) passport signatures. 13. Carbon of U.S. Armed Forces Report of Discharge. ---------------------------------- *In particular, members noted that not all documents were available in their original. It is standard practice in the profession of questioned document examination to make definitive conclusions only about documents examined in their original. Thus the panel members gave only tentative opinions for items provided them in some type of facsimile.

234 14. Selective Service registration. 15. Selective Service card. 17. Citizenship revocation. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 27, 45 and 46. Signatures on U.S.P.O. applications (4). 31. Photo of Lee Oswald (back). 32. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 33. Fair Play for Cuba card. 34. Passport application. 36. New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form, dated Aug. 9, 1968. 37. Photocopy of New Orleans Police Department fingerprint form. 38. Letter to the "Communist Party U.S.A." 39. Hotel registry. 40. Application for Cuban visa. 41. Photograph of carbon of application for Cuban visa. 42. Letter to Russian Embassy. 43. Employment form. 44. Form W4. 45. P.O. Box 6225 application. 46. Receipt for key to P.O. Box 6225. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. 55. Dallas Public Library card. (35)

II. The script writing on the following documents was done by the same person: 17. Citizenship revocation. 19. Stationery of Holland-American Line. 20. Self-questionnaire. 21. Photocopy of self-questionnaire. 22. Support affidavit. 25. Letter to "The Worker". 29. Xerox of Klein's money order. 30. Letter to "Fair Play for Cuba". 38. Letter to "Communist Party U.S.A.". 42. Letter to the Russian Embassy. 48. Photomechanical copy of letter to Russian Embassy. (36)

III. A number of documents have script and handprint, both of which are by the same person (the script writings of these documents correspond to that of documents listed above under I and II): 16. Historical diary. 18. Aline Mosby interview. 26. Employment application with letter. 30. Envelope and order form--Klein's. 43. Employment application and letter of resignation. (37)

IV. A few documents have handprint only. On those listed below, all the hand print is by the same person, and it corresponds to the handprint on documents listed above under III. Since the script in items under III corresponds to the script in items under II, it can be concluded that the items under II, III, and IV correspond. 9. Inside cover of passport. 27, 45 and 46. U.S.P.O. forms--box rental. 51. Speech. 235 (38)

V. In summary, the script writing (much of it on documents also bearing the signature of Lee H. Oswald) is identifiable with the signatures, "Lee H. Oswald." From the script writing on the documents described in section II, it is possible to create composite signatures, "Lee Harvey Oswald" and "Lee H. Oswald," which correspond to the Oswald signatures on the documents listed in section I. (39)

VI. The Russian language writing on documents 23, 56, and 57 is by the same person. Although there are a few letter design forms which appear to be in the Cyrillic alphabet, the bulk are in the Latin alphabet and correspond to their counterparts in the script and hand print in the documents listed in sections I, II, III, and IV above. (40)

VII. The two signatures, "Lee H. Oswald," in item 52 (receipts salary--Texas School Book Depository) do not correspond to the Oswald signatures as described under section I. The handwriting appears to be more skillful, with a more rhythmic flow. It varies in slant and differs in proportion. The overall writing pattern differs from the Oswald signatures in section I, as do the individual letter designs. The "L" of item 52 is taller and without an eyelet loop at the top right of the "L" as found in the section I signatures. The "H" of item 52 is distinctly different from the "II" in the section I signatures. The "0" of item 5'2 retraces on itself, not the case in the section I signatures, where it loops around at the top right and usually swings into the following "s". The "d" of item 52 reverses slant to go backhand, which does not occur in the section I signatures. (41)

VIII. The signature, "Lee Harvey Oswald," on the Hunt note (item 4-7) does not correspond to the Oswald signatures described under section I. To begin with, the bulk of the documents which are signed with the full name, "Lee Harvey Oswald," are more formal in tone. For example, the full name appears on all but one of the Marine Corps documents. The full name appears infrequently elsewhere-usually only the first name, middle initial, and last name are used. Further, in the Hunt note, the middle name "Harvey" is misspelled-the "e" appears to be missing; the "H" of "Harvey" differs from that found in the section I signatures; the "ar" of "Harvey" is ellided to a point that does not occur in any section I signatures; the "0" of "Oswald" is retraced part of the way along the left side, not true of the section I Oswald signatures; and the ending "d" of Oswald is smaller than the preceding "l", whereas most of the ending "d"s of the section I signatures are taller than the "l" (only in signatures that appear to be "squeezed-in" is the end "d" shorter than the preceding "1"). (42) While the script writing on the Hunt note is similar in pictorial quality to the writings under section II, the format of the note differs from that of the notes and letters of section II. The writing line is so exact as almost to give the impression it has been made on a ruled line. Usually Oswald writes in an arrhythmic manner--for example, with an irregular and crooked writing line. This writing creates the jumbled effect apparent in the section II documents. (43) From the examinations of item 4-7, it was determined that the signature does not correspond with any of the Oswald signatures of section I. Similarly, the writing does not correspond to that in the section II Oswald documents. (44) I would like to note, however, that the quality of the original photo reproductions of the Hunt note was poor. Under the best of circumstances, reproductions lack clarity and detail. Here, as can be seen from the copies, the original photo reproduction was out of focus, giving the document a fuzzy appearance. Accurate analysis was difficult. The note is highly suspicious. The original would have to be checked in order to make a more definite analysis and reach a definitive conclusion. (45)

IX. An examination and comparison was made of writings and signatures on documents attributed to Marina Oswald. The writings on the note (item 28) are such poor copies that it is virtually impossible to make a definite determination as to whether they correspond with the signatures of Marina Oswald on item 24. There is some similarity between the name in the return address on the envelope of item 28 and the signature of Marina Oswald on her entry papers (item 24), but the return address name is obscured to some extent by the postmark. The rest of the writing on the note (item 28) is not sufficiently parallel to the writing on her entry documents (item 29) and exemplars (item 54) to warrant any effective determination. (46) The name, "A. J. Hidell" on the Fair Play for Cuba card (item 33) was examined and compared with the exemplar writings of Marina Oswald (item 54). It was determined that. the "A. 5. Hidell" of the card (item 33) was written by Marina Oswald (as in item 54). The writing pattern of the signature on the card corresponds with that of the name "A. J. Hidell" as written by Marina Oswald on item 54. The Hidell signature in question is written with the same degree of writing skill as evinced by Marina Oswald. The slant, speed, proportions, et cetera, of the Hidell signature is matched in the writings of Marina Oswald. The design, form, and execution of stroke making up the individual letters of the Hidell signature in question (item 33) correspond to those of the letters in the writing of Marina Oswald (item 54). (47)

X. The "Jack Ruby" signature on the Cuban identification card (item 53) was examined and compared with exemplars of Jack Ruby (item 49). It was determined that the "Jack Ruby" of the Cuban identification card was written by the author of the exemplar signatures attributed to Jack Ruby (item 49). While there is an odd "J" in the identification card which does not occur in the Ruby exemplars, the rest of the letters tally in all respects. The signature has been written quickly, easily, and fluently, consistent with the writing pattern of the known exemplars. The odd "J" may be "accidental" or could be accounted for in additional writing of Ruby, most likely in spontaneous writing contemporaneous with the signature of the identification card. "Request" writing, such as that of item 49, sometimes differs slight extent from "spontaneous" writing. (48)

XI. A check was made of the historical diary (item 16). The 12 pages were written with the same type of writing instrument. The paper used for 11 of the 12 pages is similar; only the last page differs--it is appreciably thinner. The writing has a continuity from page to page and line to line that is indicative of being written about, or at, the same time. It does not give the impression of being "random" as would be expected of a diary extended over a period of time. It appears that this diary has been written within a short period of time and not over any extensive period. 237

Summary of conclusions (49) Virtually all the Lee H. Oswald and Lee Harvey Oswald signatures are by the same person. There is some normal variation among the signatures, and no significant differences along the Oswald signatures identified as being the same. The overall writing pattern consistently similar, and the individual letter designs match throughout without major differences. The same holds true for the script and hand print on these documents that are identified as being written by the same person. (50) The same writing is on the U.S. Postal money order to Klein's (item 29) as is on the various letters and correspondence. The same writing is on the order form and envelope (item 30) as is on the letters and on the inside cover of the passport (item 9). (51) The writing and signatures that appear on the letters (items 25, 32, 38, and 42) agree with the writing and signatures on the U.S. Post Office applications for post office boxes (items 27, 45, and 46). (52) The signature and writing on the back of the photograph (item 31) agree with the signatures and script writing of Oswald (sections and II). (53) Differences indicative of different authorship were found on the "Hunt" note (item 47) and the salary receipts (item 52). (54) It appears that the historical dairy (item 16) was written within a short period of time.

http://jfkassassination.net/parnell/hscahand.htm

-- Mudd Wrassler Tommy  :)

VII. The two signatures, "Lee H. Oswald," in item 52 (receipts salary--Texas School Book Depository) do not correspond to the Oswald signatures as described under section I. The handwriting appears to be more skillful, with a more rhythmic flow.

Mr McNalley concluded that Lee Oswald was NOT the person who signed the salary receipts for the TSBD..... 

WHO forged he signature of Lee Oswald ???

JFK Assassination Forum

Re: Dear Mr Hunt...
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2019, 08:44:58 PM »