Author Topic: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge  (Read 5951 times)

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Offline Edward Bauer

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2017, 12:57:24 AM »

I began shooting rifle competitively in 1966.  Zeroing is the first thing you learn.
The captain of my high school rifle team could routinely zero a rifle in one shot.  He was on the scope.  I would fire once from prone at the center rings of the A-17 type target.  He would call out the adjustments (e.g., 2 up, 3 left).  My second shot was almost always a bull.



That, my friends, is zeroing a rifle in one shot.
Lee Oswald, my friends, zeroed his reassembled rifle with the first shot.
Just stabilize the muzzle on a box, note where the curb dust kicks up relative to the crosshairs and make adjustments.  There are several ways this can be done quickly and easily.

Once you understand Oswald’s Marine Corps Score Book, you’ll realise that’s what he did with the first shot.



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Online Bob Prudhomme

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #43 on: March 20, 2017, 01:01:04 AM »
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Let you remind you that JFK's head moved only 2-2.5" forward from the missile
And that the recoil of the Carcano would be cushioned by the shoulder to an extant
And that Oswald could have easily used the iron sights

Guns in America:

The FBI reported to the Warren Commission that they actually could not zero the scope on Oswald’s gun without putting some kind of shims in it, but as you can see in the pictures, I don’t see where such shims would even go. Our scope is clearly a replica and not the same model as the Oswald scope, but it is the same power and the mount is identical. It was difficult to zero because of the very old and rudimentary design, but zero it we did. The recoil is very manageable on the Carcano, so there would be little worry of it affecting even a cheap scope.  

One thing I have never seen explained online is that the scope on the Oswald rifle is a side mount, like an M1 Garand sniper modesl. You can still use the open sights just as you would without a scope, and you don’t have to look under the mounts like you would with a modern see-thru mount. The open sights are zeroed for 200 yards and shoot about 8″ high at 50 yards. There are published theories that Oswald used the open sights on the gun, because the thinking is he could not zero the optics anyway, and that using the awkward side optic would take too long between shots to aim.

Our open sights are not adjustable, but they were pretty close to point-of-aim horizontally, but would require about an 8″ hold under. Oswald’s rifle had the same non-adjustable sights as this test gun, and it is very possible that at that distance, only 58 yards or so, he used the iron sights.

EIGHT INCHES HIGH AT 50 YARDS???? LMBO!!!

What does this clown think C2766 was, a black powder rifle? He is obviously making it up as he goes, just like you, Bill.

By my calculations, the bullet from C2766, travelling at roughly 2165 fps, would be only 4.96 inches high at 100 meters, if aimed at a target at 200 meters.

Here is the ballistics calculator I used, at this site You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login . I used a ballistics coefficient of .514, determined by using the calculator at this site You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login .

I've read articles at Guns in America before, and found them to be heavily biased toward "Oswald did it".

Say, Bill, you're a smart guy, or at least you think you are, anyways. Where would you shim the scope mount on C2766 to correct for the rifle shooting high?
"Mr. HILL. The right rear portion of his head was missing. It was lying in the rear seat of the car." WC testimony of SA Clint Hill

Online Bob Prudhomme

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #44 on: March 20, 2017, 01:03:50 AM »
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I began shooting rifle competitively in 1966.  Zeroing is the first thing you learn.
The captain of my high school rifle team could routinely zero a rifle in one shot.  He was on the scope.  I would fire once from prone at the center rings of the A-17 type target.  He would call out the adjustments (e.g., 2 up, 3 left).  My second shot was almost always a bull.



That, my friends, is zeroing a rifle in one shot.
Lee Oswald, my friends, zeroed his reassembled rifle with the first shot.
Just stabilize the muzzle on a box, note where the curb dust kicks up relative to the crosshairs and make adjustments.  There are several ways this can be done quickly and easily.

Once you understand Oswald’s Marine Corps Score Book, you’ll realise that’s what he did with the first shot.



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Hey, Ed, you ever figure out how to adjust the scope on C2766 for windage and elevation? You know, are those knobs or caps on that scope?
"Mr. HILL. The right rear portion of his head was missing. It was lying in the rear seat of the car." WC testimony of SA Clint Hill

Online Bob Prudhomme

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #45 on: March 20, 2017, 01:19:24 AM »
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I began shooting rifle competitively in 1966.  Zeroing is the first thing you learn.
The captain of my high school rifle team could routinely zero a rifle in one shot.  He was on the scope.  I would fire once from prone at the center rings of the A-17 type target.  He would call out the adjustments (e.g., 2 up, 3 left).  My second shot was almost always a bull.



That, my friends, is zeroing a rifle in one shot.
Lee Oswald, my friends, zeroed his reassembled rifle with the first shot.
Just stabilize the muzzle on a box, note where the curb dust kicks up relative to the crosshairs and make adjustments.  There are several ways this can be done quickly and easily.

Once you understand Oswald’s Marine Corps Score Book, you’ll realise that’s what he did with the first shot.



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And, seriously, you think sighting a rifle in with one shot is a big deal? Everyone knows that one.
"Mr. HILL. The right rear portion of his head was missing. It was lying in the rear seat of the car." WC testimony of SA Clint Hill

Online Bob Prudhomme

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #46 on: March 20, 2017, 02:03:04 AM »
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I think when Agar said "the M38 models" he wasn't referring to the Modello 1938 7.35 Short Rifle. M38 is often seen as shorthand for the M91/38 TS (Truppe Speciali), M91/38 Cavalry, and M91/38 Short Rifle (or the Modello 1938). These 1938 models -- the first of the series to have fixed sights -- were initially chambered in 7.35mm but, with war production measures, were chambered in 6.5mm beginning 1940. That's when really large numbers of Carcanos (with sights fixed at 200 meters) were produced. Agar is referring to these 6.5mm M91/38 Carcanos.


Do you know why the calibre of 7.35 mm was chosen for the M38, and what they planned to use as raw material to manufacture barrels for the M38 7.35x51mm short rifles?

Did you know the wider bullets for the 7.35mm weighed only 128 grains, while the 6.5mm bullets weighed 162 grains? Do you know why the 7.35mm was zeroed at 300 meters, and the 6.5mm zeroed at only 200 meters?

Outside of one being round nosed and one having a spire point, do you know the difference in construction between the 6.5mm bullet and the 7.35mm bullet?
"Mr. HILL. The right rear portion of his head was missing. It was lying in the rear seat of the car." WC testimony of SA Clint Hill

Online Bill Chapman

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #47 on: March 20, 2017, 03:06:34 AM »
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Do you know why the calibre of 7.35 mm was chosen for the M38, and what they planned to use as raw material to manufacture barrels for the M38 7.35x51mm short rifles?

Did you know the wider bullets for the 7.35mm weighed only 128 grains, while the 6.5mm bullets weighed 162 grains? Do you know why the 7.35mm was zeroed at 300 meters, and the 6.5mm zeroed at only 200 meters?

Outside of one being round nosed and one having a spire point, do you know the difference in construction between the 6.5mm bullet and the 7.35mm bullet?

What a nerd

Agar was describing the M38. Just aim the M38 center-mass and pull the damn trigger, FFS
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 03:10:12 AM
by Bill Chapman
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Online Bill Chapman

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Re: Why Hoover lied about copper residue on the curb gouge
« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2017, 05:40:57 PM »
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Mr. Rankin: …there are a good many stories about his practicing with a gun, you know, around various rifle ranges and so forth,
we have checked those out and none of them stand up at all. 

We have gone over all of that to try to find out where he could ever gain the proficiency that he appears to have had in the shooting that was done.

(Warren Commission Executive Session Jan. 27, 1964)

BFD

So they couldn't find out where he practiced... and?