Author Topic: A "mauser" by any other name...  (Read 23876 times)

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Online Michael Capasse

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #217 on: March 21, 2017, 02:28:13 AM »
If you don't know the gun make the first thing you will look for is the caliber

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Offline Bob Prudhomme

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #218 on: March 21, 2017, 03:18:22 AM »
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I don't need to know anything, other than that the Carcano resembled the Mauser close enough to easily have been mistaken for same.. according to experts. Go ahead and ignore that.

There are many different models of 7.65mm Mausers, and they are all quite distinct, and some don't really look that much like a Carcano. How do you know which model of 7.65mm Mauser they were thinking of?

Offline Bob Prudhomme

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #219 on: March 21, 2017, 03:28:27 AM »
I grew up with the same kind of good ol' boys as were examining the rifle with Fritz that day. The first thing they would have done, after opening the bolt to make sure it wasn't loaded (just like Fritz did), is to check the receiver for make, model and calibre.

Don't ask why they do it, it's just a redneck thing, like establishing the year, make and model of a car or pickup they are looking at. These guys take this seriously, and I don't believe more than a minute would have passed, following the discovery of C2766, before they all would have known it was a 6.5mm calibre rifle made in Italy.

Not a lot of Mausers made in Italy. I agree with Michael, there was definitely something fishy going on there.

Online Michael Capasse

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #220 on: March 21, 2017, 09:42:13 AM »
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I don't need to know anything, other than that the Carcano resembled the Mauser close enough to easily have been mistaken for same.. according to experts. Go ahead and ignore that.

It's that damn 7.65 you have no reasonable explanation for
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 09:42:35 AM
by Michael Capasse
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Offline Jerry Organ

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #221 on: March 21, 2017, 01:40:40 PM »
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It's that damn 7.65 you have no reasonable explanation for

It's been explained. You won't accept it.

Boone said they were just "discussing it back and forth". And Weitzman said the whole Mauser thing was "at a glance".

Online Michael Capasse

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #222 on: March 21, 2017, 03:00:39 PM »
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It's been explained. You won't accept it.

Boone said they were just "discussing it back and forth". And Weitzman said the whole Mauser thing was "at a glance".


..and then they wrote it down
(up to 3 days later)
                            :rofl3:
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 03:02:43 PM
by Michael Capasse
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Online Walt Cakebread

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Re: A "mauser" by any other name...
« Reply #223 on: March 21, 2017, 03:24:53 PM »
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I grew up with the same kind of good ol' boys as were examining the rifle with Fritz that day. The first thing they would have done, after opening the bolt to make sure it wasn't loaded (just like Fritz did), is to check the receiver for make, model and calibre.

Don't ask why they do it, it's just a redneck thing, like establishing the year, make and model of a car or pickup they are looking at. These guys take this seriously, and I don't believe more than a minute would have passed, following the discovery of C2766, before they all would have known it was a 6.5mm calibre rifle made in Italy.

Not a lot of Mausers made in Italy. I agree with Michael, there was definitely something fishy going on there.

They didn't see the MADE ITALY stamp......because it was not in a normal location for rifle marking....

I agree that there was something fishy going on.....And I believe it's a simple matter of Fritz being told incorrectly that the designated Patsy owned a mauser....

Someone who had seen the Back Yard photo that they intended to use to frame the patsy assumed the rifle was a mauser and told Fritz that it was a mauser....