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Author Topic: Oswald's Light-Colored Jacket  (Read 74175 times)

Offline Walt Cakebread

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #600 on: February 22, 2018, 07:25:14 PM »
The O.J. trial
C.S.I.
Law and Order

Everybody's a F'N detective. Beautiful.

Your posts are always so informative and helpful......Have you found a rational explanation for all of those red rings in the TSBD windows  yet?

Online John Iacoletti

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #601 on: February 22, 2018, 11:52:08 PM »
The O.J. trial
C.S.I.
Law and Order

Everybody's a F'N detective. Beautiful.

Somebody has to be.

Offline John Anderson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #602 on: February 23, 2018, 01:57:09 AM »
You're wrong on both counts.

1st).

It was Tim Nickerson who said "that is what happened".

Quote from: Tim Nickerson on February 21, 2018, 05:29:28 PM

"That is what happened. Any blanket fibers that had been on the rifle would have fallen off between the time that Oswald removed the rifle from the blanket and the time that Carl Day prepared it to be handed over to Vincent Drain."

2nd).



Allegedly the TSBD Carcano was wrapped in the blanket found in the Paine's garage for several months.

It was moved around, opened and closed etc in that time. 

It's a absolute certainty that fibers from that blanket would have been found on that rifle if the above is

true. The rough stock, sharp edges and angles would have snagged and trapped hundreds of fiubers.

I beg to differ. You said



Whether the photograph was taken on the 22nd or the 26th is Irrelevant.

The photo shows they were sloppy and used evidence handling techniques that would absolutely have

caused cross contamination between different items in their possession. In this case the homemade

TSBD wrapping paper gun case and the blanket from the Paine's garage that was allegedly used,

for at least several months, to wrap the TSBD Carcano. The disregard and lack of care shown in the photo

is proof the cross contamination could have taken place anytime the evidence was in their hands.

Since there were no fibers found on the TSBD rifle, the logical conclusion of how the fibers found on

homemade gun case got there is cross contamination. Arguing against that proposition is tantamount to

admitting evidence tampering.


In response to the part I highlighted in bold I said

A logical possibility is fibres from the blanket were on the rifle which were then transferred from the rifle to the bag.
No blanket fibres left remaining on the rifle doesn't negate that possibility.
I'm not saying that is what happened I'm saying it is possible.

Offline Gary Craig

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #603 on: February 26, 2018, 02:52:57 AM »
I beg to differ. You said

In response to the part I highlighted in bold I said

Quote from: John Anderson on February 21, 2018, 02:11:34 AM
"A logical possibility is fibres from the blanket were on the rifle which were then transferred from the rifle to the bag.
No blanket fibres left remaining on the rifle doesn't negate that possibility.
I'm not saying that is what happened I'm saying it is possible.


No blanket fibers were found on the TSBD Caracano.

That rifle was allegedly wrapped in it for months.

Kicked around the floor of the Paine's garage and possibly making a road trip to New Orleans and back.

The possibility of 3 or 4 fibers being transferred with the gun to the homemade gun case without

more remaining on it, after spending that amount of time in contact, is zero.







Offline John Anderson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #604 on: February 26, 2018, 02:56:31 PM »
You sure like posting nice pics.

Offline Tim Nickerson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #605 on: March 05, 2018, 06:29:23 PM »

The possibility of 3 or 4 fibers being transferred with the gun to the homemade gun case without

more remaining on it, after spending that amount of time in contact, is zero.


Prove it.

Offline Ray Mitcham

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #606 on: March 05, 2018, 07:05:27 PM »
Prove it.

How do you prove a negative, Richard?

Offline Tim Nickerson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #607 on: March 05, 2018, 07:36:54 PM »
How do you prove a negative, Richard?

Hey, it's not my claim, Gary.  ::)
« Last Edit: March 05, 2018, 07:45:45 PM by Tim Nickerson »

Offline Ray Mitcham

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #608 on: March 05, 2018, 09:02:20 PM »
Hey, it's not my claim, Gary.  ::)

Touche.

Offline Bill Brown

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #609 on: May 27, 2018, 06:15:23 PM »
Captain Westbrook positively identified CE-162 as the jacket found under a car in the lot behind the Texaco station.  Microscopic fibers were found inside one of the sleeves of this jacket.  According to an FBI report, these fibers were dark blue, grey-black and orange-yellow cotton fibers.

The shirt that Oswald was wearing when he was arrested consisted of dark blue, grey-black and orange-yellow cotton fibers.

Ted Callaway positively identified Lee Oswald as the man he saw running down Patton towards Jefferson.  Callaway said that Oswald was wearing a "light Eisenhower-type jacket".

When seen by Johnny Brewer and when arrested inside the theater, Oswald had no jacket on.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 05:22:27 AM by Bill Brown »

 

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