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Author Topic: Oswald's Light-Colored Jacket  (Read 74819 times)

Offline Bill Brown

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #210 on: January 23, 2018, 10:31:29 PM »
You evidently do not understand the implications of cross contamination.

You need to show the transfer of fibers was not due to cross contamination or you have no case.

That is absolutely not true.  If you feel cross contamination may have occurred, then prove it.  Until then, the record states that the microscopic fibers found inside one of the sleeves of the jacket matched microscopic fibers from Oswald's arrest shirt.

Offline Bill Brown

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #211 on: January 23, 2018, 10:37:12 PM »
As fun as it always is to play word games with you, why are you avoiding the question?

Are those fibers exclusive to one particular shirt?  A simple yes or no will suffice.


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As fun as it always is to play word games with you, why are you avoiding the question?

Word games?  You're a joke.

You said the fibers were similar.  You are wrong.

Also, how can I avoid your question when you have yet to ask one?


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Are those fibers exclusive to one particular shirt?  A simple yes or no will suffice.

Of course not.  The fibers are exclusive to shirts with the same matching microscopic fibers.  Duh.

Offline Bill Brown

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #212 on: January 23, 2018, 10:38:15 PM »


Besides, so what if Oswald did leave the house zipping up A jacket?

Why would Oswald ditch A jacket by the time he was seen by Brewer?

Offline John Mytton

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #213 on: January 23, 2018, 10:53:49 PM »
You're being dumb.

The fibers were much more than "similar".  They, in fact, were a match.



Yep!




These clowns are so desperate to find their man innocent that all reality just flies out the window, the three distinctly different fibers on the rifle matched the three distinctly different fibers found on the rifle, the FBI summed it up very well "in 1998 there was 100 billion pounds of fibers produced" which was made into millions of sheets, shirts, pants, socks, wigs, undies, bags, etc etc and when the three fibers found on the rifle matched the three fibers in Oswald's shirt we are left with powerful persuasive evidence that the fibers on the rifle came from Oswald's shirt.

When one considers the volume of fabric produced in the world each year, the number of garments of a particular color and fiber type is extremely small. The likelihood of two or more manufacturers duplicating all aspects of the fabric type and color exactly is extremely remote. The large number of dye types and colors that exist in the world, coupled with the unlimited number of possible dye combinations, makes any fiber association by color significant. One must also consider the lifespan of a particular fabric: Only so much of a given fabric of a particular color and fiber type is produced, and it will eventually end up being destroyed or dumped in a landfill.

More than 100 billion pounds of fiber were produced in 1998. Approximately 40 billion pounds of cotton were used to produce textile products during 1998 (Fiber Organon 1999), and although a great many of these fibers were used in the production of clothing, a large amount of cotton fiber was also used for other purposes, such as stuffing and padding material (batting), cotton swabs, and cotton balls. Much of the cotton used in clothing ends up undyed, as in white shirts, underwear, socks, and bed sheets, but often cotton is dyed many different shades of blue, red, green, and yellow. Much of the cotton fabric produced is also print-dyed, which imparts different color characteristics to the surface of the cotton fibers, and some cotton fabrics are dyed in such a way as to vary the color along the length of the fiber. The cotton fibers in fabrics can remain in a rough state or can be processed in different ways, such as by mercerization.

https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/about-us/lab/forensic-science-communications/fsc/july2000/deedric3.htm



JohnM
« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 11:01:08 PM by John Mytton »

Offline John Mytton

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #214 on: January 23, 2018, 10:59:31 PM »
Nice try but I don't need to feel anything regarding cross contamination because, as the records state, the fibers are there.

The question is how they arrived there if you want to use those fibers to support your case.

This is the bait you dumped on page one:

Show us how clever you are; what can you prove?


You don't get it do you, Bill doesn't have to prove anything, it's all up to you Sorenson, if you allege contamination happened you must prove contamination happened, do you have any sort of evidence that supports your belief of cross contamination?



JohnM 

Offline John Iacoletti

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #215 on: January 23, 2018, 11:45:10 PM »
Yep!

And the mountain of irrelevancies continues.  What does a 1998 statistic have to do with a 1963 murder?  And then we get this gem:

Quote
These clowns are so desperate to find their man innocent that all reality just flies out the window, the three distinctly different fibers on the rifle matched the three distinctly different fibers found on the rifle,

Well duh!  Of course the fibers on the rifle match the fibers on the rifle.

Offline John Mytton

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #216 on: January 24, 2018, 12:38:02 AM »
And the mountain of irrelevancies continues.  What does a 1998 statistic have to do with a 1963 murder?  And then we get this gem:

Well duh!  Of course the fibers on the rifle match the fibers on the rifle.



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And the mountain of irrelevancies continues.  What does a 1998 statistic have to do with a 1963 murder?

How petty, in any one year a helluva lot of fiber is produced and even if in 1963 only 1/100 of the fiber was produced than in 1998 then it's still 1 billion pounds of fiber. And no I will not be replying to the inevitable how do you know how much fiber was produced in 1963, blah blah blah... Fiber analysis is still used in 2017 and contributes to the successful prosecutions of many criminals.

EDIT It appears that in 1963 fiber production was in excess of 10 million tons and more than enough to make a lot of problems for Oswald. Case closed.


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Well duh!  Of course the fibers on the rifle match the fibers on the rifle.

That's even more petty than the one above. How sad!



JohnM
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 02:02:01 AM by John Mytton »

Offline John Anderson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #217 on: January 24, 2018, 12:46:01 PM »


Yep!




These clowns are so desperate to find their man innocent that all reality just flies out the window, the three distinctly different fibers on the rifle matched the three distinctly different fibers found on the rifle, the FBI summed it up very well "in 1998 there was 100 billion pounds of fibers produced" which was made into millions of sheets, shirts, pants, socks, wigs, undies, bags, etc etc and when the three fibers found on the rifle matched the three fibers in Oswald's shirt we are left with powerful persuasive evidence that the fibers on the rifle came from Oswald's shirt.

When one considers the volume of fabric produced in the world each year, the number of garments of a particular color and fiber type is extremely small. The likelihood of two or more manufacturers duplicating all aspects of the fabric type and color exactly is extremely remote. The large number of dye types and colors that exist in the world, coupled with the unlimited number of possible dye combinations, makes any fiber association by color significant. One must also consider the lifespan of a particular fabric: Only so much of a given fabric of a particular color and fiber type is produced, and it will eventually end up being destroyed or dumped in a landfill.

More than 100 billion pounds of fiber were produced in 1998. Approximately 40 billion pounds of cotton were used to produce textile products during 1998 (Fiber Organon 1999), and although a great many of these fibers were used in the production of clothing, a large amount of cotton fiber was also used for other purposes, such as stuffing and padding material (batting), cotton swabs, and cotton balls. Much of the cotton used in clothing ends up undyed, as in white shirts, underwear, socks, and bed sheets, but often cotton is dyed many different shades of blue, red, green, and yellow. Much of the cotton fabric produced is also print-dyed, which imparts different color characteristics to the surface of the cotton fibers, and some cotton fabrics are dyed in such a way as to vary the color along the length of the fiber. The cotton fibers in fabrics can remain in a rough state or can be processed in different ways, such as by mercerization.

https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/about-us/lab/forensic-science-communications/fsc/july2000/deedric3.htm



JohnM

Funny old world aint it? OJ Simpson got off even though both victims blood was found in his car and his ex wife's blood was found on his socks. Defence claimed it must have been planted by a racist cop and Simpson walked.

Offline John Anderson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #218 on: January 24, 2018, 01:54:09 PM »
You forgot to mention that cop was a proven liar.

Ah well then the verdict was fine.

Offline John Anderson

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Re: Oswald's Jacket
« Reply #219 on: January 24, 2018, 04:22:12 PM »
Maybe because Oswald is dead.

 

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